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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose

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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.


(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again

(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again

(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity

Spoiler: :: OE
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The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 11th Edition, 2005

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 136
Page: 660

Originally posted by pau.sabria on 18 Aug 2007, 06:55.
Last edited by Bunuel on 01 Oct 2018, 22:40, edited 3 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2012, 05:46
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The first split is going to be on redundancy. Regain and again do not go together. So, let’s remove A, B and D.
Second, between C and E, E distorts the meaning saying that the composer has declined, and never regained his popularity, especially after death. Can a dead person decline and regain? But the intended meaning is that the reputation declines and never regains its earlier status. Hence C.
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2007, 07:09
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pau.sabria wrote:
Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again

regains popularity again is redundant usage. Also, once the composer is dead, he cannot often go into decline!

(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

... regain again is redundant usage again

(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again

declines in reputation seems awkward; regained is in the wrong tense

(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity
has declined in reputation after death is awkward - present perfect is not required here


I think C uses the coordinate conjunction but preceded by a comma correctly; C creates two independent clauses properly contrasted by the use of BUT that creates the desired effect of the statement - the kind of composer WHO receives popular acclaim while living, BUT whose (points to the composer properly) reputation declines after death and never regains its former status
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2007, 09:25
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OA is C.

Thanks to you all.

However, official explanation says:

(B) The two clauses are not parallel, lack of coordinating conjunction, and do not describe the same thing; reduntant again.

(C) Correct. This sentence presents the proper logic while maintaining parallel structure and consistent verb tense.

Can anybody explain me why (B) is not describing the same thing and (C) is?
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2012, 00:15
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Concept tested: Redundancy, preposition, parallelism, modifiers.
Difficulty: 700
Illustration: Carefully examine the following sentence
My sister, who is a teenager, and whose street play was appreciated by all, won the local talent award yesterday.
This is a perfectly correct sentence as “who is a teenager” and “whose street play was appreciated by all” both modifier the subject “My sister”.

Now lets look at the options.
A is wrong because the composer does not go into decline after his or her death, but his or her reputation does.
B is incorrect because it uses redundant construction “regains its status again”.
D and E are wrong for the same reason we eliminated A i.e the composer himself does not go into decline after death.
C is correct (option C breaks the FANBOYS rule, which a lot of prep companies advocate to eliminate answer choices. Please see below for clarification.).

Tip:
A lot of prep companies adopt the rule of FANBOYS which says
Independent clause, independent clause is a run on sentence.
o to make it correct we use the construction:
Independent clause, FANBOYS independent clause; FANBOYS stands for “For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet, So”.
However, the converse is not necessarily true. Two clauses separated by comma and FANBOYS do not necessarily mean they need to be independent clauses.
E.g My brother loves to drive so fast that his co passengers often fear being headlined in the newspapers the following day, and hates to wear seat-belts.
The sentence without the punctuation would become haywire.
Also, the punctuation rules are not tested on the GMAT.

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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2012, 10:14
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We have covered this sentence in our article "Alien word not so alien". This sentence is easy if you pay attention to meaning:

alien-words-not-so-alien-136331.html

Here is the explanation:

Let me just compare the correct answer choice (C) with the original answer choice (A):
A. often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again
C. but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

The first thing to notice here is that Choice C has far many new words than Choice A. These words are “but, whose, reputation, former, status”. Yet, this choice is the correct answer.
Now let’s analyze both these answer choices from meaning standpoint to better understand the role of the alien words in choice C.

Choice A: Per this choice, the sentence says that a certain kind of composer gains popularity while alive, declines after death and never regains his popularity. This meaning just does not make sense because once the composer has died, he cannot decline any further. This choice conveys absolutely illogical meaning.

Choice C: Per this answer choice, a certain kind of composer gains popularity when alive, but after death, his reputation declines and it never regains its previous status. Indeed. This answer choice makes all the sense and hence is the correct answer choice.

Look at the article to see some other examples that test this concept.
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Dec 2012, 01:10
Thanks e-GMAT/Souvik for wonderful explanations.

But guys I've a bit confusion over option B and C :

@souvik,you mentioned that B is incorrect because it uses redundant construction “regains its status again”. Very true.
Apart from this error, I think another discrepancy in this option B is when we try to fit this option with the rest of the sentence,it doesn't get to fine as 'whose' doesn't get the subject it refers to.Had the original sentence used ',' (comma) after 'the kind of composer' (i.e. the kind of composer,who receives popular acclaim while living,whose...) then the first part of the whole sentence would have been proper.This same goes for 'C' also I guess.
Moreover the B uses 'regain'-'again'...It's redundant. But,I think the another redundancy goes with C also... i.e. 'regains its former status'. One will regain ONLY something that one was already associated with some time in the past.. hence, something which is 'former'.' So don't you think use of 'former' is NOT required with 'regain' hence redundant.


Please help me understand this guys...

e-GMAT/Souvik ,if you can come with the resolution.
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Dec 2012, 16:49
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Hi debayan,

You ask very valid questions. Let me give answer to both your questions here.

Choice B: whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again.

There is no problem with the reference of “whose” here. Just like “who”, “whose” also refers to “the kind of composer”. Look at this simple sentence:

The man with white hat is my uncle who has three yachts, and whose brewery is famous nationwide.

In the very same, in the official choice B, “whose” clearly refers to “the kind of composer” without any ambiguity. Now “who” is a relative pronoun that may be preceded by a comma or may not be preceded by one. Presence of comma does not affect its modification or of any other parallel entity in the list.

However, there is something else happening in Choice B. Notice that the subject “reputation” has two verbs “declines” and “regains”. These two verbs are correctly joined by “and”. This construction makes entire choice be the second entity in the parallel list, the first being “who often receives…”. Now since there are just two entities in the list per choice B, there should be a marker between the two entities, i. e. before “whose”. But there is no marker. This is another error.

Now let’s take a look at the use “former” in choice C: but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

Use of former suggests that after death, certain kind of composer does not enjoy that level of popularity that he/she enjoyed while alive. It’s not that he/she loses all the popularity. He/ she retains some popularity but not that popularity that he/she enjoyed when he/she was alive.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
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New post 04 Sep 2013, 22:03
I am not clear about the referent of "Its". Pls help me in this regard. Thanks
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2014, 03:38
Hi,
Here we are looking for parallelism between 'receives' and 'reputation declines and regains'.
Rule of FANBOYS says : IC , FANBOY , IC
here in correct choice C there is no IC in second clause. C choice is : 'but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status.'
here structure is :
Joachim....living(IC) ,But (FANBOY) whose...status(DC).
here whose indicates DC clause,but we need a IC. Then how it is correct?
Due to this I feel B is better though it has regain and again in same sentence which can be an error.
Please highlight.
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New post 12 Feb 2014, 09:48
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Hi Karan,

You are looking for three parallel items on a single list, but according to the meaning of the sentence, the three items can't be part of the same list, because the first item refers to the composer whereas the next two items refer to the composer's reputation. So, it doesn't make logical sense to place all three as part of the same list, and we need two separate clauses here. (Also, even if we take all three items to be part of a single list, we still can't identify option B as correct because the third item is not an IC even in option B. In this option, the last item is "never regains", so there's no subject that can be parallel to "who" and "whose reputation".)

So, as option C correctly shows, we need the conjunction "but" to create a new clause that is about the composer's reputation (not the composer). Then, we need "and" to join the verbs "declines" and "regains".

So, option C is fine. Note that the 'comma + conjunction + independent clause' structure is not always applicable, so follow the logic and the intended meaning of the sentence at all times.

I hope this helps!

Regards,
Meghna
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2014, 11:52
egmat wrote:
Hi Karan,

You are looking for three parallel items on a single list, but according to the meaning of the sentence, the three items can't be part of the same list, because the first item refers to the composer whereas the next two items refer to the composer's reputation. So, it doesn't make logical sense to place all three as part of the same list, and we need two separate clauses here. (Also, even if we take all three items to be part of a single list, we still can't identify option B as correct because the third item is not an IC even in option B. In this option, the last item is "never regains", so there's no subject that can be parallel to "who" and "whose reputation".)

So, as option C correctly shows, we need the conjunction "but" to create a new clause that is about the composer's reputation (not the composer). Then, we need "and" to join the verbs "declines" and "regains".

So, option C is fine. Note that the 'comma + conjunction + independent clause' structure is not always applicable, so follow the logic and the intended meaning of the sentence at all times.

I hope this helps!

Regards,
Meghna



Thanks Meghna. for explanation ..

If option B is stated in such manner:
Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living and whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status ..

Is this sentence right ..
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New post 12 Feb 2014, 12:08
rahultripathi2005 wrote:
Thanks Meghna. for explanation ..

If option B is stated in such manner:
Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living and whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status ..

Is this sentence right ..


You're welcome. :-)

This version is better than the existing option, but the contrast between the acclaim and the decline in popularity is better expressed through "but" rather than "and".

Regards,
Meghna
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2014, 18:14
monirjewel wrote:
I am not clear about the referent of "Its". Pls help me in this regard. Thanks


I was thinking the same thing! I eliminated B because I thought "its" was a little ambiguous, but then I saw the same pronoun used in C and since other answer choices had more obvious errors, I picked C.

Would be thankful if someone would explain why "its" is correct in this sentence. reputation regained its status? Seems illogical.
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New post 17 Sep 2014, 11:55
bytatia wrote:
monirjewel wrote:
I am not clear about the referent of "Its". Pls help me in this regard. Thanks


I was thinking the same thing! I eliminated B because I thought "its" was a little ambiguous, but then I saw the same pronoun used in C and since other answer choices had more obvious errors, I picked C.

Would be thankful if someone would explain why "its" is correct in this sentence. reputation regained its status? Seems illogical.


Happy to help. Here the pronoun "its" is referring back to "reputation", the subject of this final, subordinate clause: "but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status." Thinking about the meaning, it's clear that the reputation is the thing that never regains status.

Be careful with calling pronouns ambiguous. The GMAT is tolerant of ambiguity, so just because you aren't sure what the pronoun is referring to, don't eliminate it.

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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2015, 13:48
egmat wrote:
Hi Karan,

You are looking for three parallel items on a single list, but according to the meaning of the sentence, the three items can't be part of the same list, because the first item refers to the composer whereas the next two items refer to the composer's reputation. So, it doesn't make logical sense to place all three as part of the same list, and we need two separate clauses here. (Also, even if we take all three items to be part of a single list, we still can't identify option B as correct because the third item is not an IC even in option B. In this option, the last item is "never regains", so there's no subject that can be parallel to "who" and "whose reputation".)

So, as option C correctly shows, we need the conjunction "but" to create a new clause that is about the composer's reputation (not the composer). Then, we need "and" to join the verbs "declines" and "regains".

So, option C is fine. Note that the 'comma + conjunction + independent clause' structure is not always applicable, so follow the logic and the intended meaning of the sentence at all times.

I hope this helps!

Regards,
Meghna


Although I got the question right and I agree that regain again is absolutely redundant, I can't fathom the idea that regain former status is not redundant.
What the difference in regain his status and regain his former status?
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2015, 06:33
b2bt wrote:
Although I got the question right and I agree that regain again is absolutely redundant, I can't fathom the idea that regain former status is not redundant.
What the difference in regain his status and regain his former status?


"Former status" wouldn't be considered redundant because the words don't mean the same thing. The definition of "regain" is to "attain again" so including the word "again" adds a word that shouldn't be there. Former and status don't overlap in meaning, so there isn't a case of redundancy.

I think you could make a case that "former" isn't necessary in the sentence because we are regaining a status that would have to be former, but as I read the sentence with former included it sends me back to the status discussed earlier in the sentence. In that way "former" is helpful in the sentence.

Regardless, we can see that the GMAT didn't feel it was redundant because we don't have any valid options that omit the word "former".

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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2017, 20:33
souvik101990 wrote:
Concept tested: Redundancy, preposition, parallelism, modifiers.
Difficulty: 700
Illustration: Carefully examine the following sentence
My sister, who is a teenager, and whose street play was appreciated by all, won the local talent award yesterday.
This is a perfectly correct sentence as “who is a teenager” and “whose street play was appreciated by all” both modifier the subject “My sister”.

Now lets look at the options.
A is wrong because the composer does not go into decline after his or her death, but his or her reputation does.
B is incorrect because it uses redundant construction “regains its status again”.
D and E are wrong for the same reason we eliminated A i.e the composer himself does not go into decline after death.
C is correct (option C breaks the FANBOYS rule, which a lot of prep companies advocate to eliminate answer choices. Please see below for clarification.).

Tip:
A lot of prep companies adopt the rule of FANBOYS which says
Independent clause, independent clause is a run on sentence.
o to make it correct we use the construction:
Independent clause, FANBOYS independent clause; FANBOYS stands for “For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet, So”.
However, the converse is not necessarily true. Two clauses separated by comma and FANBOYS do not necessarily mean they need to be independent clauses.
E.g My brother loves to drive so fast that his co passengers often fear being headlined in the newspapers the following day, and hates to wear seat-belts.
The sentence without the punctuation would become haywire.
Also, the punctuation rules are not tested on the GMAT.


Great post! MANHATTAN GMAT has a great article on FANBOYS here https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/2016/01/15/gmat-grammar-weekly-fanboys/
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2018, 22:35
hi,

Please let me know why there is "receives" in non-underlined portion. Also, what does "its" refer to in OA?
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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2018, 22:54
shr90 wrote:
hi,

Please let me know why there is "receives" in non-underlined portion. Also, what does "its" refer to in OA?


Why do you think "receives" should be in underlined part, and what do you think "its" refers to here?
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