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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose

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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: OG 13 Q137 SC Question for Mike Mc Garry  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2016, 16:55
1
crunchboss wrote:
Yes sir, This all make sense. Thanks a Lot.

I find one more problem from GMAT Prep software -

Narwhals can be called whales of the ice: in icy channels, ponds, and ice-shielded bays they seek sanctuary from killer whales, their chief predator, and their annual migrations following the seasonal rhythm of advancing and retreating ice.

(A) their annual migrations following
(B) their annual migrations which follow
(C) their annual migrations follow
(D) whose annual migrations following
(E) whose annual migrations follow

Official Explanation says "whose" is ambiguous. I have some hard time understanding this. Can You please help me sir why is "whose" ambiguous here.

Dear crunchboss,
I'm happy to respond. :-) This is a subtle one.

By the time the sentence gets to the part about "annual migrations," we have past two notable nouns: narwhals and killer whales. Any structure that leaves ambiguity about which of these two animals is migrating is problematic.

The prompt and the OA, (C), use the pronoun "their." Notice that the same pronoun, "they" and "their" has been used already to refer to the narwhal, so saying "their annual migrations" clearly refers to the narwhals as well. The unity of the pronoun use creates the logical connection. No ambiguity.

By contrast, the structure "whose annual migrations" ----well, whose? Narwhals or killer whales? Both nouns precede the word "whose," so either could reasonably be the antecedent. This construction opens up an ambiguity of interpretation that exists neither in the prompt nor in the OA.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2017, 19:33
souvik101990 wrote:
Concept tested: Redundancy, preposition, parallelism, modifiers.
Difficulty: 700
Illustration: Carefully examine the following sentence
My sister, who is a teenager, and whose street play was appreciated by all, won the local talent award yesterday.
This is a perfectly correct sentence as “who is a teenager” and “whose street play was appreciated by all” both modifier the subject “My sister”.

Now lets look at the options.
A is wrong because the composer does not go into decline after his or her death, but his or her reputation does.
B is incorrect because it uses redundant construction “regains its status again”.
D and E are wrong for the same reason we eliminated A i.e the composer himself does not go into decline after death.
C is correct (option C breaks the FANBOYS rule, which a lot of prep companies advocate to eliminate answer choices. Please see below for clarification.).

Tip:
A lot of prep companies adopt the rule of FANBOYS which says
Independent clause, independent clause is a run on sentence.
o to make it correct we use the construction:
Independent clause, FANBOYS independent clause; FANBOYS stands for “For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet, So”.
However, the converse is not necessarily true. Two clauses separated by comma and FANBOYS do not necessarily mean they need to be independent clauses.
E.g My brother loves to drive so fast that his co passengers often fear being headlined in the newspapers the following day, and hates to wear seat-belts.
The sentence without the punctuation would become haywire.
Also, the punctuation rules are not tested on the GMAT.


Great post! MANHATTAN GMAT has a great article on FANBOYS here https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/2016/01/15/gmat-grammar-weekly-fanboys/
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2018, 21:35
hi,

Please let me know why there is "receives" in non-underlined portion. Also, what does "its" refer to in OA?
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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2018, 21:54
shr90 wrote:
hi,

Please let me know why there is "receives" in non-underlined portion. Also, what does "its" refer to in OA?


Why do you think "receives" should be in underlined part, and what do you think "its" refers to here?
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2018, 21:59
ArupRS wrote:
shr90 wrote:
hi,

Please let me know why there is "receives" in non-underlined portion. Also, what does "its" refer to in OA?


Why do you think "receives" should be in underlined part, and what do you "its" refers to here?


hi,
i am not saying receives should be underlined, i just wanted to know the subject of it.
i have highlighted the "its"


Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.


(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again

(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again

(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of compose  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2018, 02:31
shr90 wrote:
ArupRS wrote:
shr90 wrote:
hi,

Please let me know why there is "receives" in non-underlined portion. Also, what does "its" refer to in OA?


Why do you think "receives" should be in underlined part, and what do you "its" refers to here?


hi,
i am not saying receives should be underlined, i just wanted to know the subject of it.
i have highlighted the "its"


Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.


(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again

(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again

(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity


Hello my Friend,

Then my question becomes what does come to your mind as the subject for the verb "receives"?
And if you have any doubt regarding the noun referred by the pronoun "its", again what do you think "its" refers?

I do not think anyone, let alone will be able to answer your questions if you do not provide this information.

Regards,
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2019, 02:25
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind   [#permalink] 14 Nov 2019, 02:25

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