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Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind

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Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2017, 05:56
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61% (00:43) correct 39% (00:53) wrong based on 175 sessions

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Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind, she paddled fiercely toward the safety of the harbor through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last.

(A) through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last.
(B) through the seeming endless waves, each larger than the last.
(C) through the seemingly endless waves, each of those larger than the last.
(D) through the seemingly endless waves, each larger than the last.
(E) through waves that seemingly have no end, each larger than the last.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2017, 07:01
Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind, she paddled fiercely toward the safety of the harbor through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last.

(A) through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last. (adjective 'seemingly' should be used)
(B) through the seeming endless waves, each larger than the last. (adjective 'seemingly' should be used)
(C) through the seemingly endless waves, each of those larger than the last.
(D) through the seemingly endless waves, each larger than the last. (best choice)
(E) through waves that seemingly have no end, each larger than the last. (changes the meaning)
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2017, 18:20
rohan2345 wrote:
Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind, she paddled fiercely toward the safety of the harbor through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last.

(A) through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last.
(B) through the seeming endless waves, each larger than the last.
(C) through the seemingly endless waves, each of those larger than the last.
(D) through the seemingly endless waves, each larger than the last.
(E) through waves that seemingly have no end, each larger than the last.


A-Seeming is wrong , we need adverb
B- same as A
C-keep
D-keep
E- Modifier error

Between C and D ..D is more concise..hence D.
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2017, 03:37
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Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind, she paddled fiercely toward the safety of the harbor through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last.

(A) through the seeming endless waves, each of those larger than the last. (Need adverb seemingly instead of seeming)
(B) through the seeming endless waves, each larger than the last. (Same as A)
(C) through the seemingly endless waves, each of those larger than the last. (Wordy)
(D) through the seemingly endless waves, each larger than the last. (Correct)
(E) through waves that seemingly have no end, each larger than the last. (Changes the meaning of the original sentence)

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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2017, 11:12
In option d, seemingly (adverb) modifies endless waves which is noun, it should modify verb , could you please tell me how option d is correct?
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2017, 15:28
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In option d, seemingly (adverb) modifies endless waves which is noun, it should modify verb , could you please tell me how option d is correct?


In this case, the adverb "seemingly" modifies the adjective "endless" -- not "waves." And that's not a problem at all: you can always use an adverb to modify an adjective.
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2017, 16:36
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
In option d, seemingly (adverb) modifies endless waves which is noun, it should modify verb , could you please tell me how option d is correct?


In this case, the adverb "seemingly" modifies the adjective "endless" -- not "waves." And that's not a problem at all: you can always use an adverb to modify an adjective.



Dear Charles,

Is usage of 'each of those' correct? I think each is enough to refer to 'waves'.

What do you think?
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2017, 10:03
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Is usage of 'each of those' correct? I think each is enough to refer to 'waves'.

What do you think?


Yeah, I agree with you in this case. "Each of those" seems redundant to me in this example: "... through the seemingly endless waves, each of the waves larger than the last." It's not grammatically wrong, exactly, but it seems like a waste of words. :)
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Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2017, 14:13
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
Is usage of 'each of those' correct? I think each is enough to refer to 'waves'.

What do you think?


Yeah, I agree with you in this case. "Each of those" seems redundant to me in this example: "... through the seemingly endless waves, each of the waves larger than the last." It's not grammatically wrong, exactly, but it seems like a waste of words. :)


Can GMAT throw an option which is "correct" and just a little wordy ( a couple of redundant words)?
There has to be, in my view, more reason than just wordiness for C to be not a correct choice.
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2017, 18:56
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Can GMAT throw an option which is "correct" and just a little wordy ( a couple of redundant words)?
There has to be, in my view, more reason than just wordiness for C to be not a correct choice.


I think that the GMAT draws a distinction between redundancy and wordiness. I actually agree with you in general: "wordiness" isn't, by itself, a very compelling reason to eliminate an answer choice. In most official questions, there's something stronger than "wordiness" that allows you to eliminate the wrong answer choices.

(And yes, I know that the OG explanations often dismiss wrong answers as just "wordy" or "wordy and awkward." But the OG explanations are notoriously lazy, and weren't written by the same people who wrote the questions. In the overwhelming majority of cases, you can find a better reason for the elimination than just "wordiness". And I'd also argue that tons of right answers are pretty darned wordy... but that's not helpful. :) )

But redundancy is a different thing. If something is repeated unnecessarily, that's just wrong on the GMAT. There are official questions that squeeze the phrases "last year" and "annually" into the same sentence -- that's always wrong. There's another question that uses the phrase "has the ability to" and "to be able to" in the same sentence. That's unambiguously wrong, too.

To be fair, this (non-official!) question probably blurs the line a little bit between "wordiness" and "redundancy." If the ONLY difference between (C) and (D) is a couple of unnecessary words, I guess I'll always pick the one that doesn't have those unnecessary words. But official GMAT questions will usually give you something meatier to work with.
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2017, 19:56
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Just one more angle to what Ninja has said reg: each of those". Herein, 'those' refers to the object of the preposition 'through' and therefore we need an object pronoun 'them' rather than the demonstrative subject pronoun 'those'.
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Re: Keeping the nose of her kayak directly into the wind   [#permalink] 25 May 2017, 19:56
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