GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 20 Oct 2019, 19:43

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Nov 2018
Posts: 30
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Mar 2019, 14:36
AjiteshArun wrote:
2asc wrote:
What does 'which' refer to? I feel like it is the purchase that gave the US land, not the territory. Also, the land cannot give US control of the river, but the purchase can.

Assuming that which is referred to the purchase, can someone please confirm that the touch rule does not apply when the noun is followed by prepositional phrase?
I'm not sure what you mean by the "touch rule", but there is no rule in English that restricts what a relative pronoun can refer to in situations like this one. For example:

The last goal of the match, which...

1. The last goal of the match, which had gone into overtime...
2. The last goal of the match, which was scored by...

Both (1) and (2) are acceptable.


Doesn't which usually refer to the word right before the comma? If both cases are correct, how do we decipher if both examples you gave are in the options?
From my understanding of OA of this question, if the structure of the sentence is noun + prepositional, 'which' will reference the noun before the prepositional, and not the noun within the prepositional. Are you sure the two are interchangeable?
Thanks for your help!
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Nov 2018
Posts: 30
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Mar 2019, 14:40
VeritasKarishma

Hi Karishma! Do you mind looking at my response above and clarify my confusion? Thanks!
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3050
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Mar 2019, 19:48
2asc wrote:
Doesn't which usually refer to the word right before the comma? If both cases are correct, how do we decipher if both examples you gave are in the options?
From my understanding of OA of this question, if the structure of the sentence is noun + prepositional, 'which' will reference the noun before the prepositional, and not the noun within the prepositional. Are you sure the two are interchangeable?
Thanks for your help!
I'd appreciate it if you could let me know what the "touch rule" is. That will help me better answer your question (I interpreted your "please confirm that the touch rule does not apply when the noun is followed by prepositional phrase" question as "please confirm that a which can refer to a noun that is not literally 'touching' the which"). Meanwhile, to get an idea of how messy relative pronouns can get, you could take a look at this post.

Generally speaking, if there are multiple nouns before a relative pronoun in an option, we may need to take that option out for ambiguity (after checking the other options). That does not mean, however, that there is a "rule" restricting what the which can refer to. If you are asking whether I am sure about that, I am. :)
_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Nov 2018
Posts: 30
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Mar 2019, 20:32
AjiteshArun wrote:
2asc wrote:
Doesn't which usually refer to the word right before the comma? If both cases are correct, how do we decipher if both examples you gave are in the options?
From my understanding of OA of this question, if the structure of the sentence is noun + prepositional, 'which' will reference the noun before the prepositional, and not the noun within the prepositional. Are you sure the two are interchangeable?
Thanks for your help!
I'd appreciate it if you could let me know what the "touch rule" is. That will help me better answer your question (I interpreted your "please confirm that the touch rule does not apply when the noun is followed by prepositional phrase" question as "please confirm that a which can refer to a noun that is not literally 'touching' the which"). Meanwhile, to get an idea of how messy relative pronouns can get, you could take a look at this post.

Generally speaking, if there are multiple nouns before a relative pronoun in an option, we may need to take that option out for ambiguity (after checking the other options). That does not mean, however, that there is a "rule" restricting what the which can refer to. If you are asking whether I am sure about that, I am. :)


Thanks for the link! I understand that it is okay to reach behind the prepositional, given that there is compelling reason to do so.
In terms of this question, is there sufficient reason to assume that 'the purchase' gave US land? I understand that the OA is the most correct answer (through POE), but I don't think I can automatically justify the reach-over.
VP
VP
User avatar
P
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 1479
Location: India
Schools: ISB
GPA: 3.31
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Mar 2019, 04:18
2asc wrote:
What does 'which' refer to? I feel like it is the purchase that gave the US land, not the territory. Also, the land cannot give US control of the river, but the purchase can.


Well, for what it's worth (since it seems to be an unofficial question), one could argue that the purchase was that of Louisiana territory, and this territory provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

For example, it would be perfectly find to say that US purchased Alaska and Alaska gave US, access to vast oil reserves (the purchase gave US, access to vast oil reserves would be fine as well).
_________________
Thanks,
Ashish
EducationAisle, Bangalore

Sentence Correction Nirvana available on Amazon.in and Flipkart

Contact us for Classroom sessions in Bangalore and Private Tutoring worldwide
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9704
Location: Pune, India
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Mar 2019, 04:46
1
2asc wrote:
AjiteshArun wrote:
2asc wrote:
What does 'which' refer to? I feel like it is the purchase that gave the US land, not the territory. Also, the land cannot give US control of the river, but the purchase can.

Assuming that which is referred to the purchase, can someone please confirm that the touch rule does not apply when the noun is followed by prepositional phrase?
I'm not sure what you mean by the "touch rule", but there is no rule in English that restricts what a relative pronoun can refer to in situations like this one. For example:

The last goal of the match, which...

1. The last goal of the match, which had gone into overtime...
2. The last goal of the match, which was scored by...

Both (1) and (2) are acceptable.


Doesn't which usually refer to the word right before the comma? If both cases are correct, how do we decipher if both examples you gave are in the options?
From my understanding of OA of this question, if the structure of the sentence is noun + prepositional, 'which' will reference the noun before the prepositional, and not the noun within the prepositional. Are you sure the two are interchangeable?
Thanks for your help!


"which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley." is a noun modifier modifying "that (purchase)".
The noun modifier NEED NOT modify the noun right before it. It can modify a main noun before the noun of the propositional phrase.

Note that Louisiana territory did not provide new land etc. The "purchase" provided new land etc. But you need to specify the purchase so it is essential to say "purchase of Louisiana territory". The which modifier will come after that though it refers to purchase. So you may want to have the modifier sticking to the noun but it may not always be possible. It is acceptable for it to be a bit away.

Look at the logic of the sentence to see what makes sense. There are not many non-negotiable "rules" and hence we always look for the "best option".
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 08 Jan 2019
Posts: 56
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2019, 20:27
Clarifying a few points:

Double Negatives which actually introduces redundancy is allowed in GMAT? Basically which takes priority?

Correct comparison + Modifier aspect or the above?

Purchase of Alaska was like the purchase of Louisiana - so some kind of comparison clause marker is required

Next

If comparing purchase - that's a verb not a noun ...

But then move on

Which provided should be the correct modifier as "for providing" does not make much modifier sense.

Now when down to the answer choices, it will be evident that none of them provides all of the correct options in order.

Kindly if anyone knows the rules for which takes precedence in choosing an answer as asked before, that will be quite nice...
I guess all the questions asked above are also pointing in essence to the same question.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase   [#permalink] 08 Jun 2019, 20:27

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 27 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





cron

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne