GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 20 Aug 2018, 19:14

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 06 Apr 2011
Posts: 41
GMAT ToolKit User
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Dec 2013, 05:58
3
12
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

57% (00:56) correct 43% (01:07) wrong based on 604 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

(A) not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided
(B) not unlike the Louisiana territory, which provided
(C) like the Louisiana territory, which provided
(D) like that of the Louisiana territory for providing
(E) as that of the Louisiana territory for providing

Here we are comparing the purchase of Alaska to the purchase of Louisiana (as that of Louisiana). Eliminated B, C since the comparisons are not parallel.

Hung up between A, D and E. All of them seem to be correct to me. Help please :(
Most Helpful Community Reply
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Aug 2014
Posts: 16
Location: Georgia
Concentration: Finance, General Management
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V39
GPA: 3.97
WE: Accounting (Accounting)
Reviews Badge
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Sep 2014, 23:57
4
2
start with "that of"
As we are comparing purchase of Alaska with the purchase of Louisiana, we need "that of". So B and C are out.

Then look at "which provided" VS "for providing". "For providing" is general and it's impossible to identify to what it refers to. while "while provides" is specific, so we know it refers to the purchase of Louisiana.

So A should be the correct answer.
General Discussion
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Status: You have to have the darkness for the dawn to come
Joined: 09 Nov 2012
Posts: 313
Daboo: Sonu
GMAT 1: 590 Q49 V20
GMAT 2: 730 Q50 V38
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jan 2017, 00:12
1
[quote="mniyer"]Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

(A) not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided
(B) not unlike the Louisiana territory, which provided
(C) like the Louisiana territory, which provided
(D) like that of the Louisiana territory for providing
(E) as that of the Louisiana territory for providing

(A)Correct not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided. Here comparison is 100% correct that of ...... In that " that is referring to purchase.
(B)Incorrect not unlike the Louisiana territory, which provided. here purchase is compared with Louisiana territory and is wrong
(C) Incorrect like the Louisiana territory, which provided. here purchase is compared with Louisiana territory and is wrong. we need to compare purchase with another purchase.
(D)Incorrect like that of the Louisiana territory for providing. for providing. because purchase was not made for providing.....
(E Incorrect as that of the Louisiana territory for providing. as is wrong and for providing is wrong for the reason stated in option D.
_________________

You have to have the darkness for the dawn to come.

Give Kudos if you like my post

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 01 Jun 2015
Posts: 230
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, International Business
GMAT 1: 620 Q48 V26
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jan 2017, 04:13
Does "not unlike" create redundancy?? any help?

Posted from my mobile device

Posted from my mobile device
Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3186
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jan 2017, 04:19
techiesam wrote:
Does "not unlike" create redundancy?? any help?

Posted from my mobile device

Posted from my mobile device


Not redundancy, it is double negative, which is alright. Redundancy refers to unrequired word or phrase - here if one of the negatives ("not" or "un") is not used, then the meaning is changed. Hence this is not a case of redundancy.
Senior SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 14 Nov 2016
Posts: 1322
Location: Malaysia
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jan 2017, 23:29
2
mniyer wrote:
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

(A) not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided
(B) not unlike the Louisiana territory, which provided
(C) like the Louisiana territory, which provided
(D) like that of the Louisiana territory for providing
(E) as that of the Louisiana territory for providing

Here we are comparing the purchase of Alaska to the purchase of Louisiana (as that of Louisiana). Eliminated B, C since the comparisons are not parallel.

Hung up between A, D and E. All of them seem to be correct to me. Help please :(


When you first examine this question, there are several clear Decision Points: “not unlike” vs. “like” vs. “as” and “which provided” vs. “for providing.” The easiest Decision Point, however, is a little harder to notice: the choice between having “that of” and not having it. To make this a logical, apples-to-apples comparison you must have “that of” are you comparing the purchase of Alaska to “Louisiana” or “that of (meaning the purchase of) Louisiana”? “That of Louisiana” is necessary to make it a logical, purchase-to purchase comparison, so answer choices B and C are incorrect. Also, answer choice E is incorrect, because you do not use “as” to make noun-to-noun comparisons (but you will be able to eliminate it for other reasons as well). Importantly, the choice between “like” and “not unlike” is a classic false Decision Point; they could both be used here, but people often eliminate “not unlike” prematurely.

The remaining decision is more difficult and quite subtle, but you should at least know to assess it because of the obvious Decision Point. As you have seen in earlier examples, you will often want to scan the answer choices at the first and last words/phrases for differences, and here there is a 2-1 split between “territory, which provided” and “territory for providing” What is the difference? “Which provided” makes it clear that the Louisiana territory provided the new land, strategic position, and Mississippi River valley. “For providing” leaves that ambiguous at best, or assigns it to Alaska at worst. Either way, the meaning is either unclear or incorrect, and answer choices D and E suffer from this modifier reference problem.

Answer choice A—the choice that many eliminate upon first glance for the double-negative—is correct.
_________________

"Be challenged at EVERY MOMENT."

“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

"Each stage of the journey is crucial to attaining new heights of knowledge."

Rules for posting in verbal forum | Please DO NOT post short answer in your post!

Advanced Search : https://gmatclub.com/forum/advanced-search/

Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 23 Jan 2013
Posts: 598
Schools: Cambridge'16
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Oct 2017, 04:27
"not unlike" has its own meaning, so cannot be substituted. Only A fits, B is out
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 05 Nov 2015
Posts: 68
Location: India
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jan 2018, 10:37
mikemcgarry, sayantanc2k, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja, broall, hazelnut, Vyshak, generis

can someone please explain the use of 'which' here
SC Moderator
User avatar
D
Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 1710
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 4
WE: Analyst (Retail)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jan 2018, 19:14
2
s8kadian wrote:
can someone please explain the use of 'which' here


Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that (purchase) of the Louisiana territory, which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

Here, which refers to the purchase of the Louisiana territory. Whenever a noun is followed by a prepositional phrase, which can jump over the prepositional phrase (of the Louisiana territory) and refer to the noun (purchase).
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 May 2017
Posts: 9
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Feb 2018, 03:49
daboo343 wrote:
mniyer wrote:
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

(A) not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided
(B) not unlike the Louisiana territory, which provided
(C) like the Louisiana territory, which provided
(D) like that of the Louisiana territory for providing
(E) as that of the Louisiana territory for providing

(A)Correct not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided. Here comparison is 100% correct that of ...... In that " that is referring to purchase.
(B)Incorrect not unlike the Louisiana territory, which provided. here purchase is compared with Louisiana territory and is wrong
(C) Incorrect like the Louisiana territory, which provided. here purchase is compared with Louisiana territory and is wrong. we need to compare purchase with another purchase.
(D)Incorrect like that of the Louisiana territory for providing. for providing. because purchase was not made for providing.....
(E Incorrect as that of the Louisiana territory for providing. as is wrong and for providing is wrong for the reason stated in option D.


Shouldn't "which" go right after the word "that" or "purchase"? Because it looks like Louisiana territory itself provided for the United States.
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 301
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Feb 2018, 17:03
Hi archie1stnorth,

Thank you for your question. Re-positioning the word "which" will change the meaning of the sentence, specifically what the phrase "provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley" is referring to.

Here is how it's written in the original answer:

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

In this case, the phrase is referring to the Louisiana Territory, which exists along the Mississippi River valley, so it's CORRECT.

Here is how I think you're suggesting it could be changed:

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska, which was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

Now, the phrase is referring back to the purchase of Alaska, and that doesn't make sense - Alaska isn't located alone the Mississippi River valley!

I hope that helps clear things up!
_________________

"Students study. GMAT assassins train."
Image

Image

★★★★★ GMAT Club Verified Reviews for EMPOWERgmat & Special Discount


GMAT Club Verbal Advantage EMPOWERgmat Critical Reasoning Question Pack

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 May 2017
Posts: 9
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Feb 2018, 20:03
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hi archie1stnorth,

Thank you for your question. Re-positioning the word "which" will change the meaning of the sentence, specifically what the phrase "provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley" is referring to.

Here is how it's written in the original answer:

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

In this case, the phrase is referring to the Louisiana Territory, which exists along the Mississippi River valley, so it's CORRECT.

Here is how I think you're suggesting it could be changed:

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska, which was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, provided the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

Now, the phrase is referring back to the purchase of Alaska, and that doesn't make sense - Alaska isn't located alone the Mississippi River valley!

I hope that helps clear things up!


Hello, dear Expert.

Thank you for your answer. I am sorry for being not clear enough. I will try to explain my thoughts better.

You mentioned:

EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
In this case, the phrase is referring to the Louisiana Territory, which exists along the Mississippi River valley, so it's CORRECT.


But the question doesn't ask what exists along the Mississippi River Valley.

What it actually asks is: What provided the United States with new land etc...?
The answer to this question, IMHO, should be the purchase, not the Louisiana territory itself.

And here how i think it could be changed:

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase of Alaska was not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, providing the United States with new land, a strategic military position, and control of the entire Mississippi River valley.

Again, thank you for your time!
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 31 May 2017
Posts: 311
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Feb 2018, 22:04
(A) not unlike that of the Louisiana territory, which provided
This option got its comparison correct. Lets hold on to this option for now.

(B) not unlike the Louisiana territory, which provided
We are not comparing the purchase of alaska to louisiana territory - Incorrect

(C) like the Louisiana territory, which provided
Again the purchase of alaska is compared to that of louisiana. Incorrect

(D) like that of the Louisiana territory for providing
Purchase was not done for providing the united states. Incorrect.

(E) as that of the Louisiana territory for providing
Purchase of louisiana was as - Incorrect

Answer: Option A
_________________

Please give kudos if it helps

Resources
Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT ! ! ! | SC Blogs by Magoosh | How to improve your verbal score | Things i wish i could've done earlier | Ultimate Q51 Guide

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 12 Mar 2017
Posts: 161
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
Schools: IIMA
GMAT 1: 630 Q49 V27
GPA: 4
CAT Tests
Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 May 2018, 11:00
sayantanc2k wrote:
techiesam wrote:
Does "not unlike" create redundancy?? any help?

Posted from my mobile device

Posted from my mobile device


Not redundancy, it is double negative, which is alright. Redundancy refers to unrequired word or phrase - here if one of the negatives ("not" or "un") is not used, then the meaning is changed. Hence this is not a case of redundancy.


sayantanc2k , abhimahna

I read in GMAT club grammar book(Pg 85) :

In English, double negatives must be avoided. It is incorrect to use two negatives in the same sentence clause.
Example:
INCORRECT
I don’t have no money.
CORRECT
I don’t have any money. OR I have no money.

That was the reason why I eliminated A. Could you please shed some light on this?
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3690
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 May 2018, 03:05
Prateek176 wrote:
sayantanc2k , abhimahna

I read in GMAT club grammar book(Pg 85) :

In English, double negatives must be avoided. It is incorrect to use two negatives in the same sentence clause.
Example:
INCORRECT
I don’t have no money.
CORRECT
I don’t have any money. OR I have no money.

That was the reason why I eliminated A. Could you please shed some light on this?


Hey Prateek176 ,

I would not reject any option blindly unless it is not providing the right meaning or is incorrect.

The sentences you provided have incorrect meaning.

I don’t have no money. -- It means you lack "no money". Do you think that is the correct meaning?

But in the sentence given, not Unlike means - It is NOT unlike XYZ or in other terms it is not dissimilar.

Hence, I would not prefer to reject the options based on the double negation reason if I can get the meaning by using double negatives.

Does that make sense?
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Re: Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase &nbs [#permalink] 08 May 2018, 03:05
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Known to its considerable opposition as "Seward's Folly", the purchase

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.