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LSAT Style with Kasheska- Australian Wine for this

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Eternal Intern
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Joined: 07 Jun 2003
Posts: 463

Kudos [?]: 171 [0], given: 0

Location: Lone Star State
LSAT Style with Kasheska- Australian Wine for this [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2003, 20:27
In a survey of consumers in an Eastern European nation, respondents were asked two questions about each of 400 famous Western brands, whether or not, they recognized the brand name and whether or not they thought the products bearing that name were of high quality. The results of the survey were a rating and corresponding rank order for each brand based on recognition, and a second rating- plus- ranking based on approval. The brands ranked in the top 27 for recognition were those actually available in that nation. The approval rankings of these 27 brands often differed sharply from their recognition rankings. By contrast, most of the other brands had ratings, and thus rankings, that were essentially the same for recognition as for approval.
Which one of the following, if each is a principle about consumer surveys, is violated by the survey described?

A) Never ask all respondants a question if it cannot reasonably be answered by respondants who make a particular response to another question in the same survey.

What exactly does this mean?

Kudos [?]: 171 [0], given: 0

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Joined: 07 Jul 2003
Posts: 768

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Location: New York NY 10024
Schools: Haas, MFE; Anderson, MBA; USC, MSEE
Re: LSAT Style with Kasheska- Australian Wine for this [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2003, 20:37
Curly05 wrote:
In a survey of consumers in an Eastern European nation, respondents were asked two questions about each of 400 famous Western brands, whether or not, they recognized the brand name and whether or not they thought the products bearing that name were of high quality. The results of the survey were a rating and corresponding rank order for each brand based on recognition, and a second rating- plus- ranking based on approval. The brands ranked in the top 27 for recognition were those actually available in that nation. The approval rankings of these 27 brands often differed sharply from their recognition rankings. By contrast, most of the other brands had ratings, and thus rankings, that were essentially the same for recognition as for approval.
Which one of the following, if each is a principle about consumer surveys, is violated by the survey described?

A) Never ask all respondants a question if it cannot reasonably be answered by respondants who make a particular response to another question in the same survey.

What exactly does this mean?


This means that you shouldn't ask a question that can or cannot be answered based on the answer to another question in the same survey.

For example: one of the questions asked is "do you think products of this brand are of high quality?" However, this question obviously cannot be answered if the answer to the other question "Do you recognize this brand?" is NO.
_________________

Best,

AkamaiBrah
Former Senior Instructor, Manhattan GMAT and VeritasPrep
Vice President, Midtown NYC Investment Bank, Structured Finance IT
MFE, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley, Class of 2005
MBA, Anderson School of Management, UCLA, Class of 1993

Kudos [?]: 243 [0], given: 0

Re: LSAT Style with Kasheska- Australian Wine for this   [#permalink] 21 Jul 2003, 20:37
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LSAT Style with Kasheska- Australian Wine for this

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