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M02-12

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M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 00:17
1
7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

67% (01:20) correct 33% (01:19) wrong based on 306 sessions

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Re M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 00:17
1
Official Solution:


Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. If \(x\) is a prime number, then \(x\) can be 7, 17, 37, and so on. 7 is divisible by 7, but 17 and 37 are not.

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. If \(x = 7\), then the answer to the question is yes. If \(x = 17\) then the answer is no; if \(x = 37\) then the answer is no.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are insufficient. \(x\) can still be 7, 17, 37, etc.


Answer: E
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Re: M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2015, 18:33
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. If \(x\) is a prime number, then \(x\) can be 7, 17, 37, and so on. 7 is divisible by 7, but 17 and 37 are not.

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. If \(x = 7\), then the answer to the question is yes. If \(x = 17\) then the answer is no; if \(x = 37\) then the answer is no.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are insufficient. \(x\) can still be 7, 17, 37, etc.


Answer: E



Hi Brunel, I got the same answer, but it took me more than 3 minutes to confirme my answer. Do you know if is it possible to do the question in a faster way?

Regards,
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Re: M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2015, 11:14
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. If \(x\) is a prime number, then \(x\) can be 7, 17, 37, and so on. 7 is divisible by 7, but 17 and 37 are not.

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. If \(x = 7\), then the answer to the question is yes. If \(x = 17\) then the answer is no; if \(x = 37\) then the answer is no.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are insufficient. \(x\) can still be 7, 17, 37, etc.


Answer: E



Hi Bunuel,

Statement (1) Says X is prime. How is one of the answers then 7? 1 is not a prime number please help me understand then how 5(1) +2 is in this range then? I'm likely misunderstanding your given solution.

Thanks
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Re: M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2015, 10:39
stov10 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. If \(x\) is a prime number, then \(x\) can be 7, 17, 37, and so on. 7 is divisible by 7, but 17 and 37 are not.

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. If \(x = 7\), then the answer to the question is yes. If \(x = 17\) then the answer is no; if \(x = 37\) then the answer is no.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are insufficient. \(x\) can still be 7, 17, 37, etc.


Answer: E



Hi Bunuel,

Statement (1) Says X is prime. How is one of the answers then 7? 1 is not a prime number please help me understand then how 5(1) +2 is in this range then? I'm likely misunderstanding your given solution.

Thanks


The stem says that the remainder is 2 when x is divided by 5.
(1) says that x is a prime number.

x can be 7 because 7 is a prime and 7 divided by 5 gives the remainder of 2.
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Re: M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2017, 10:12
Hi Bunuel

From the question we can make out that x has ones digit of 2 or 7.

1. This eliminates all the nos. with 2 as units digit.
So, as you said the no. could be 7, 17, 37, 57 etc. But none of these, or any of the greater prime nos. with units digit as 7, are divisible by 7.
Hence, sufficient.

2. Statement one is a subset of statement 2, without the "prime no. condition", therefore can also have a no. like 77.
Hence, not sufficient.

Ans: Option 1

What is your take?
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Re: M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2017, 10:49
bibinphilips wrote:
Hi Bunuel

From the question we can make out that x has ones digit of 2 or 7.

1. This eliminates all the nos. with 2 as units digit.
So, as you said the no. could be 7, 17, 37, 57 etc. But none of these, or any of the greater prime nos. with units digit as 7, are divisible by 7.
Hence, sufficient.


2. Statement one is a subset of statement 2, without the "prime no. condition", therefore can also have a no. like 77.
Hence, not sufficient.

Ans: Option 1

What is your take?


I don't understand what you mean by the red part.

For (1): x can be 7 so divisible by 7 or say 17, so not divisible by 7. Two different answers not sufficient.
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Re: M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2018, 20:09
Bunuel wrote:
If the remainder is 2 when \(x\) is divided by 5, then is \(x\) divisible by 7?


(1) \(x\) is a prime number

(2) \(x + 3\) is a multiple of 10


Hey Bunuel

Just to understand, x can be 2 also in general and even for answer choice 1. 2 divided by 5 will leave the remainder as 2. Am I missing something?

Thanks
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New post 02 Sep 2018, 02:53
gmatlife wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
If the remainder is 2 when \(x\) is divided by 5, then is \(x\) divisible by 7?


(1) \(x\) is a prime number

(2) \(x + 3\) is a multiple of 10


Hey Bunuel

Just to understand, x can be 2 also in general and even for answer choice 1. 2 divided by 5 will leave the remainder as 2. Am I missing something?

Thanks


Yes, x can be 2, for (1) because 2 divided by 7 gives the remainder of 2.
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Re: M02-12  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2018, 05:27
What about the no. 67?
When divided by five there's a remainder of 2,and when added with 3 it is divisible by 7.
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New post 17 Dec 2018, 05:33
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Re: M02-12   [#permalink] 17 Dec 2018, 05:33
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