GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Aug 2019, 04:58

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 26 Dec 2017
Posts: 153
Reviews Badge
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jun 2018, 03:05
daagh wrote:
Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared — a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally.

A. appeared — a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

B. appeared — a red sash across her chest and a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse and waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

C. appeared — a red sash across her chest; a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse and was waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

D. appeared with a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat, she rode in circles on her gray horse and was waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

E. appeared with a red sash across her chest and a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat, rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

This is indeed a daunting question to especially those non-natives who may not have heard of 'asyndeton' before. I was under the impression that the two modifiers are co-ordinate adverbs (which do not require to be conjugated with a conjunction) describing how the queen appeared. Still, we may try other roads to reach our Rome.

Choice B is unparallel with a clause before 'and' a phrase after.
Choice C is un-stylistic since a semicolon is not used unless there is a distraction from the presence multiple commas in a sentence.
Choice D is a run - on with no conjunction between the two ICs
Choice E is unparallel with no conjunction between the two verbs
What remains is A.

Incidentally, --waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally-- is common to all the five choices. Why underline that phrase unduly?



Hi Experts,

When can we have asyndeton in a sentence.
Is it limited only for noun phrases or how can we identify
_________________
--If you like my post pls give kudos
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 23 Jul 2014
Posts: 66
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 May 2019, 14:23
mikemcgarry wrote:
avohden wrote:
Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared — a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally.

A. appeared — a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

B. appeared — a red sash across her chest and a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse and waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

C. appeared — a red sash across her chest; a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse and was waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

D. appeared with a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat, she rode in circles on her gray horse, and was waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

E. appeared with a red sash across her chest and a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat, rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

I'm happy to help. :-) This is a hard question.

The phrases "a red sash across her chest" and "a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat" are absolute phrases. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/absolute-p ... -the-gmat/
These are separated by commas, do not take conjunctions, and cannot be in parallel to anything other than another absolute phrase.
(B) is incorrect, because it puts a conjunction between two absolute phrases
(C) is incorrect, because it separates absolute phrases with semicolons
(D) is a run-on sentence
(E) is also a run-on --- the two verbs in parallel, "appeared" and "rode" must be joined by a conjunction.

Choice (A) has no flaws and is the best answer. The semicolon divides her appearance from her action. The sentence has a very nice flow.

It's funny --- the only error I saw in (A) wasn't the subject of a split at all.
"....waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally."
It's not clear to me that the pronoun "them" has a clear antecedent. This is the type of mistake that the real GMAT often employs in incorrect answer choices ---- using a singular collective noun, here "crowd", and then a plural pronoun referring to its members. That's illegal. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-pronoun-traps/
A possible correct phrasing would be ....
" ...waving at the crowd as if she knew each person personally."

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi mikemcgarry, daagh, AjiteshArun, GMATNinja,

Could any of you please confirm if we can generalize Mike's rationale behind eliminating B?

(B) is incorrect, because it puts a conjunction between two absolute phrases. Can we say - "Two Absolute Phrases can never take a Conjunction?" Seems like an Extreme Statement to me.

I did however spot the "them" issue but noticed that that was a common across all options.
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 2964
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 May 2019, 18:30
anud33p wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry, daagh, AjiteshArun, GMATNinja,

Could any of you please confirm if we can generalize Mike's rationale behind eliminating B?

(B) is incorrect, because it puts a conjunction between two absolute phrases. Can we say - "Two Absolute Phrases can never take a Conjunction?" Seems like an Extreme Statement to me.

I did however spot the "them" issue but noticed that that was a common across all options.
As far as I know, an and can be used to join two absolutes. However, an absolute should not be joined to the rest of the sentence with a conjunction.

1. Absolute + and + Absolute ← This should be fine.

2. Absolute, Absolute ← This is also fine.

3. Absolute + Conjunction + Clause. ← This is not correct.
_________________
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 26 Jan 2016
Posts: 179
CAT Tests
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2019, 06:59
Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally.

One thing is for sure after reading the sentence that 'waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally' is a verb-ing modifier modifying action 'rode in circles'. Only A and E follow this, so B,c&D are out

(B) appeared—a red sash across her chest and a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse and waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

(C) appeared—a red sash across her chest; a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse and was waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

(D) appeared with a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat, she rode in circles on her gray horse, and was waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

Now b/w A & E
(A) appeared—a red sash across her chest, a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally

(E) appeared with a red sash across her chest and a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat, rode in circles on her gray horse, waving at the crowd as if she knew each of them personally- Here sentence is structured such that 'appeared and rode becomes parallel but there is no conjunction to join the two clauses'. So incorrect

Hence A
_________________
Your Kudos can boost my morale..!!

I am on a journey. Gradually I'll there..!!
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 23 Jan 2018
Posts: 204
Location: India
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
CAT Tests
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Aug 2019, 21:47
AjiteshArun : Does GMAT test this concept? An absolute phrase is tested frequently, but two absolute phrases not connected by any conjunction is rare.
There are other glaring errors by which we can discard other options. But the problem is we may think that this is also a glaring error if we are not aware of this concept, selecting another option which may have some "soft error" to our perception as I did.
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 2964
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Aug 2019, 18:56
1
ArupRS wrote:
AjiteshArun : Does GMAT test this concept? An absolute phrase is tested frequently, but two absolute phrases not connected by any conjunction is rare.
There are other glaring errors by which we can discard other options. But the problem is we may think that this is also a glaring error if we are not aware of this concept, selecting another option which may have some "soft error" to our perception as I did.
Hi ArupRS,

I don't think that the GMAT is going to go out of its way to test something like this, but I think you might just find this official question interesting. :)
_________________
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 23 Jan 2018
Posts: 204
Location: India
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
CAT Tests
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Aug 2019, 19:43
1
AjiteshArun wrote:
ArupRS wrote:
AjiteshArun : Does GMAT test this concept? An absolute phrase is tested frequently, but two absolute phrases not connected by any conjunction is rare.
There are other glaring errors by which we can discard other options. But the problem is we may think that this is also a glaring error if we are not aware of this concept, selecting another option which may have some "soft error" to our perception as I did.
Hi ArupRS,

I don't think that the GMAT is going to go out of its way to test something like this, but I think you might just find this official question interesting. :)


AjiteshArun: pretty interesting official question. Thank you for sharing this.

Regards,
Arup
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 May 2014
Posts: 23
Location: India
GMAT 1: 710 Q49 V38
CAT Tests
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2019, 21:41
Hello,

Can someone explain what's wrong with option C? I eliminated all others and picked C. I remember reading that hyphen is normally used to present reason/results/how. and the individual elements seemed like elements in a list explaning how the rodeo appeared. the latter part seems fine too.

GMATNinja
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 2964
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Aug 2019, 22:23
krishsaisree wrote:
Hello,

Can someone explain what's wrong with option C? I eliminated all others and picked C. I remember reading that hyphen is normally used to present reason/results/how. and the individual elements seemed like elements in a list explaning how the rodeo appeared. the latter part seems fine too.

GMATNinja
It's those semicolons. Semicolons are not used to join absolute phrases (there is no list here).

... a red sash across her chest; a crown hugging the band of her cowboy hat; she rode in circles on her gray horse...

In X; Y; and Z, we'd need an and, and we'd need X, Y, and Z to be parallel.

Here is an official question in which the semicolon is used correctly as a "big comma".
_________________
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a   [#permalink] 11 Aug 2019, 22:23

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 29 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Midway through the parade, the rodeo queen from New Mexico appeared—a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne