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Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates

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Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2015, 08:02
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Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates soared after the Great Wall Street Crash of 1929 by presenting various pieces of evidence, out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17, only one less than the same number in 1929.

A. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17

B. out of whom the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17

C. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17

D. out of which the most interesting argument is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17

E. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17 suicide cases
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2015, 11:44
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Reto,

My Dear friend, I dont know if you are a man or a machine but seriously your questions are amazing. :good

Also the quantum of questions you are able to sum up and put here is mindblowing!! Good job and keep up the good work.
By POE:

A. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17-amounted to a sum of 17 is the wrong idiom ; it is usually used for money so out

B. out of whom the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17-"out of which" is correct usage so out.

C. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17-hold it

D. out of which the most interesting argument is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17-it is not an argument. out

E. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17 suicide cases-17 has to come at the end so that the following clause "only one less" rightly modifies the number so out

Regards,
Dom

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Re: Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2015, 02:25
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Its an easy one...amounted to a sum of----its wrong..one can either use amounted to or a sum of as both of these have same meaning so A and D are out
"out of whom" is wrong...B is out
"number of suicide cases amounted to 17 suicide cases" their is no need to repeat "suicide cases" after 17 as its already mention in the sentence that what amounted to 17 so E is out

Its C the Winner!

reto wrote:
Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates soared after the Great Wall Street Crash of 1929 by presenting various pieces of evidence, out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17, only one less than the same number in 1929.

A. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17

B. out of whom the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17

C. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17

D. out of which the most interesting argument is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to a sum of 17

E. out of which the most interesting, arguably, is that the number of suicide cases per 100,000 people in 1928, a year before the Great Crash, already amounted to 17 suicide cases

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Re: Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2015, 22:38
There are 3 splits towards the end:
Will you say that "the number of suicide cases amounted"
1) to 17
2) to a sum of 17
3) to 17 suicide cases?
Option 1) right? :) So, with that we have eliminated A, D and E

Between B) and C), look at the opening modifier "out of whom" or "out of which". "whom" normally refers to people, and in this context it should refer to "things" so B is also out.

We are only left with choice C
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Re: Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2017, 05:23
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Re: Modern historians have challenged the common belief that suicide rates   [#permalink] 06 Aug 2017, 05:23
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