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Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their stru

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Manager
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Joined: 21 Dec 2009
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Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their stru  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 11 Sep 2018, 00:16
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Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their structures have been published. Before a naturally occurring chemical compound can be used as a drug, however, it must be put through the same rigorous testing program as any synthetic compound, culminating in a published report detailing the chemical’s structure and observed effects.

If the statements above are true, which of the following must also be true on the basis of them?


(A) Any naturally occurring chemical can be reproduced synthetically once its structure is known.

(B) Synthetically produced chemical compounds cannot be patented unless their chemical structures are made public.

(C) If proven no less effective, naturally occurring chemicals are to be preferred to synthetic compounds for use in drugs.

(D) Once a naturally occurring compound has been approved for use as a drug, it can no longer be newly patented.

(E) A naturally occurring chemical cannot be patented unless its effectiveness as a drug has been rigorously established.

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Originally posted by SudiptoGmat on 27 Jan 2010, 06:32.
Last edited by Bunuel on 11 Sep 2018, 00:16, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their stru  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2010, 08:10
Has to be D

A naturally occurring compound - approved for use as a drug ---> A report about its structure has been published ---> if report published, it cannot be newly patented
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Re: Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their stru  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2010, 08:41
Stimulus contains several facts, not an argument (it lacks conclusion)

Let's summarize the facts:
1) One cannot patent naturally occurring chemical, after its structure has been published
2) To use the chemical as a drug, its structure and effects should be published.

It means that if some natural chemical is used as a drug, its structure has already been published. So nobody can patent it again.


It's (D)
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Re: Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their stru  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2010, 14:09
My answer is D.

Since once the structure is published, you cannot patent the naturally occuring chemicals.
You cannot use the natural compound as a drug till it gets tested.

Thus the sequence of event looks like -

Structure gets published -> tested -> Aprroval/Denial

Hence we cannot patents the drug which is approved.

OA please. Thanks.
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Re: Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their stru  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2018, 10:07
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Re: Naturally occurring chemicals cannot be newly patented once their stru &nbs [#permalink] 10 Sep 2018, 10:07
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