GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 26 Aug 2019, 02:17

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
GMAT Tutor
avatar
G
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1834
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Jun 2019, 12:01
1
Bunuel wrote:

1. What is the importance of the first 10 questions?

Experiment: We will try to disprove the myth the way OG/GMAC positions it: the first 10 questions are not critical
Methodology: we will attempt the worst case scenario and will answer the first 10 questions incorrectly (not guess but incorrectly); then we will attempt to answer the remaining 21 questions correctly (not guess)
Result: Score - Q30. Percentile - 19th (!!!). First 10 questions WRONG. The next 21 questions CORRECT
Analysis: obviously something is not right with the myth about the first 10 questions. They appear to be very important on the Quant. If you miss the first 10 (probably not a very realistic scenario for most) you have no way of climbing out of the hole - almost all questions that were offered to me were generally easy/medium difficulty.


I posted about this question in the previous GMATPrep scenarios thread, but I'll try one more time. To me, this experiment proves the opposite: that early questions are not more important than later ones. But we need to properly define our expectations in advance of a study like this: what score should we reasonably expect a test taker could achieve if they answer their first ten questions incorrectly?

From the conclusion drawn above, and the evidence used to support it (which I'm reading this way: "we get a Q50 with our first 21 right and last 10 wrong, but a Q30 with our last 21 right and first 10 wrong, therefore the first ten questions are especially important"), I'm inferring that some people expect you should get a similar score in those two scenarios. But you very clearly should not get even remotely similar scores in those situations (as I explain below). I find it remarkable you can even get a Q30 if you get your first ten questions wrong.

I'll simplify things a lot, to avoid any complicated math: for each question, the GMAT algorithm knows the probability that a 300-level test taker will answer correctly, and that a 500-level test taker will, and that a 700-level test taker will (and any other level of course). Using those probabilities, when the algorithm knows a test taker's right and wrong answers to many questions, the algorithm can work out using some probability theory what a test taker's most likely ability level is. That's all the scoring algorithm is really doing.

Now, let's ask "how likely is it that a 700-level test taker (so Q47 ish) would answer the first ten questions incorrectly?" We can't answer that precisely without knowing exactly how hard each question is, but since the test is adaptive, say we assume the first three questions are 500, 400, and 300 level, and then the next seven questions are all 300 level. GMAT questions, in the language of test theory, 'discriminate' very well: high level test takers rarely get easy questions wrong, and low level test takers rarely get hard questions right (except by lucky guessing, which the algorithm understands will happen 20% of the time or more). Using standard parameter values, a 700-level test taker will get a 300-level question right roughly 99% of the time. If that's not true for a certain test taker, that test taker simply is not at the 700-level, by definition. So you can already see how astronomically improbable it is that this 700-level test taker will get eight 300-level questions wrong in a row - it's (1/100)^8, or 1 in 10 quadrillion. Throw in the 400 and 500 level questions, then using the math behind the algorithm, the probability a 700-level test takers gets their first ten questions wrong is roughly 1 in 6,600,000,000,000,000,000. To put that in perspective, if one hundred 700-level test takers took the GMAT every single day since the beginning of the universe 14 billion years ago, this would still almost certainly never have happened: it would still be extremely unlikely that a 700-level test taker had answered their first ten questions incorrectly even one time, in 14 billion years. 700-level test takers simply never do this, so why should we expect the algorithm to give a Q47 score to someone who does, no matter how they perform later in the test?

Even the 500-level (Q30 ish) test taker almost never does this. It's 500,000 times more likely, if someone answers the first ten questions incorrectly, that a test taker is a 300-level test taker than a 500-level one, in the scenario I described above. In fact, the 300-level test taker also almost never does this -- even someone guessing completely at random is unlikely to do it -- but if anyone does, it's almost always someone at the absolute bottom of the scoring scale. That you can recover to reach a 500-level after that performance, even after proving to the test that you're worse than a domesticated cat pawing random answers at the keyboard, to me demonstrates that you can recover very successfully from an anomalously bad performance early in the test. Examining more realistic scenarios (while carefully defining expected results in advance) would demonstrate that.

The reverse happens when the test taker answers the first 21 questions correctly. It's extremely rare that even a Q50 level test taker will do this. You're well above a Q51 level if you do. So it shouldn't be surprising that your score doesn't drop too far after that point, even with an unusually bad performance at the end.

For test takers, the consequences are these:

- if you can get right answers early in the test, do - right answers are very valuable;
- if you can't for some questions, don't worry about it. The test can get hard early on, and a wrong answer to a hard early question doesn't hurt you any more than a wrong answer to a hard late question. You're supposed to get hard questions wrong no matter where they are in the test unless you're a top-level test taker;
- do not invest an inordinate amount of time early in the test. That will help you less than you might think early on, but will hurt you a lot later in the test.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Apr 2018
Posts: 2
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jun 2019, 21:30
Hi,

I gave Prep 6 with only 3 questions wrong in Quants, wrong question nos are 21, 28 and 31. But I got a Q49 with 75 percentile.
I have also got Q49 in Preps 1,2 & 5 but the no:of wrong questions were around 9,10 & 8.

So, why did my score not improve in Prep 6?

Thanks,
Anirban
Director
Director
User avatar
V
Joined: 06 Jan 2015
Posts: 695
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Finance
GPA: 3.35
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Premium Member
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jun 2019, 21:36
AnirbanGmat wrote:
Hi,

I gave Prep 6 with only 3 questions wrong in Quants, wrong question nos are 21, 28 and 31. But I got a Q49 with 75 percentile.
I have also got Q49 in Preps 1,2 & 5 but the no:of wrong questions were around 9,10 & 8.

So, why did my score not improve in Prep 6?

Thanks,
Anirban


AnirbanGmat Check the level of those question which you got incorrect.... If they are of 500 level it will drag you to low...
_________________
आत्मनॊ मोक्षार्थम् जगद्धिताय च

Resource: GMATPrep RCs With Solution
GMAT Tutor
avatar
G
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1834
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jun 2019, 07:24
1
AnirbanGmat wrote:
I gave Prep 6 with only 3 questions wrong in Quants, wrong question nos are 21, 28 and 31. But I got a Q49 with 75 percentile.
I have also got Q49 in Preps 1,2 & 5 but the no:of wrong questions were around 9,10 & 8.

So, why did my score not improve in Prep 6?


One of my concerns about the experiments in this thread is that they give the profoundly misleading impression that the scoring algorithm cares for some reason which question numbers you get right and which you get wrong - I'm afraid this thread can give the impression that the algorithm gives a certain weight to say question #10, and a different weight to question #15. That's simply not true - the algorithm doesn't care about question number at all. It cares about question difficulty. And the difficulty of each specific question varies a lot from test to test.

When a test is full of very hard questions, you can still get a very strong score with many wrong answers, because even a Q49 level test taker is not expected to get Q50-Q51 questions right too often. But when a test is full of easy questions, you need to be almost perfect to get a strong score, because a Q49 level test taker is expected to get a Q29 level question right almost every time. The free official practice tests have a lot of hard questions in the database, so they're often very forgiving of wrong answers. But when you buy the additional tests, you can exhaust the supply of hard questions, and then you can end up taking tests consisting mostly of easy/medium questions. That's what happened in your case: you had a test with lower level questions, and needed to be nearly perfect to get a good score. Notice that doesn't actually affect your score at all -- you got a Q49 just as before -- but it does affect the number of wrong answers you can have and still get a Q49.

On the real test, the question bank will be deep enough that it should feel like your early GMATPrep tests - you'll likely see a lot of hard questions, and you'll be able to get a Q49 or Q50 with several wrong answers.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
Founder
Founder
User avatar
V
Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 18003
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V42
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jun 2019, 07:56
Thanks Ian! Fully agree with you.

So the assumption of your statement or perhaps my inference of it, is that Test 6 is made up of mostly easy questions. Which therefore means that comparing one's results from Test 6 to other tests, such as 1 or 2 which have access to a deeper DB of questions, is not apples to apples comparison. Moreover, Test 6 also a diff experience from the Official GMAT which is more like Tests 1 & 2.

Thanks!
B.


IanStewart wrote:
AnirbanGmat wrote:
I gave Prep 6 with only 3 questions wrong in Quants, wrong question nos are 21, 28 and 31. But I got a Q49 with 75 percentile.
I have also got Q49 in Preps 1,2 & 5 but the no:of wrong questions were around 9,10 & 8.

So, why did my score not improve in Prep 6?


One of my concerns about the experiments in this thread is that they give the profoundly misleading impression that the scoring algorithm cares for some reason which question numbers you get right and which you get wrong - I'm afraid this thread can give the impression that the algorithm gives a certain weight to say question #10, and a different weight to question #15. That's simply not true - the algorithm doesn't care about question number at all. It cares about question difficulty. And the difficulty of each specific question varies a lot from test to test.

When a test is full of very hard questions, you can still get a very strong score with many wrong answers, because even a Q49 level test taker is not expected to get Q50-Q51 questions right too often. But when a test is full of easy questions, you need to be almost perfect to get a strong score, because a Q49 level test taker is expected to get a Q29 level question right almost every time. The free official practice tests have a lot of hard questions in the database, so they're often very forgiving of wrong answers. But when you buy the additional tests, you can exhaust the supply of hard questions, and then you can end up taking tests consisting mostly of easy/medium questions. That's what happened in your case: you had a test with lower level questions, and needed to be nearly perfect to get a good score. Notice that doesn't actually affect your score at all -- you got a Q49 just as before -- but it does affect the number of wrong answers you can have and still get a Q49.

On the real test, the question bank will be deep enough that it should feel like your early GMATPrep tests - you'll likely see a lot of hard questions, and you'll be able to get a Q49 or Q50 with several wrong answers.

_________________
Founder of GMAT Club

Just starting out with GMAT? Start here...
Want to know application stats & Profiles from last year? Check the Decision Tracker
GMAT Tutor
avatar
G
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1834
NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jun 2019, 08:14
1
bb wrote:
Thanks Ian! Fully agree with you.

So the assumption of your statement or perhaps my inference of it, is that Test 6 is made up of mostly easy questions. Which therefore means that comparing one's results from Test 6 to other tests, such as 1 or 2 which have access to a deeper DB of questions, is not apples to apples comparison. Moreover, Test 6 also a diff experience from the Official GMAT which is more like Tests 1 & 2.


I haven't used those tests much, but my understanding is that those tests try not to deliver repeat questions, so a high-level test taker can exhaust the hard questions by the time she takes test #6. But the medium-level test taker probably won't exhaust those questions, so test #6 won't seem easy to everyone. If that's wrong, I'm sure someone will correct me!

For a high-level test taker, comparing a test with mostly easy questions and a test with mostly hard questions is not an "apples to apples comparison" if you're asking "what score will I get with 3 wrong answers?" But it is an apples to apples comparison if your question is simply "what score will I get?" The algorithm knows how often test takers at every level answer each question correctly. So the algorithm might know that a Q49 level test taker gets 500-level questions right 90% of the time, and 750-level questions right 50% of the time. If a test contained 31 questions, all at the 500-level, then someone who answers roughly 90% of those correctly will get a Q49. If the test contained 31 750-level questions, someone who answers roughly 50% of them correctly would get a Q49.

The one important difference in those two scenarios is that the test can be much more certain about a test taker's precise level the more questions it delivers around that test taker's level. So if a test delivers mostly 500-level questions to a Q49 level test taker, that test taker will get almost everything right. The algorithm will know "this test taker is really good" but it won't be sure exactly how good. The test might say "this person is a Q49" but if you could ask the algorithm "what margin of error would you attach to that score?" the algorithm would give a fairly large margin of error. It would give a much smaller margin of error if it could deliver that Q49 level test taker a lot of 700-level questions. That's why the test adapts - the algorithm can give more precise scores the more questions it delivers around your level. And one consequence of that: a Q49 level test taker will see bigger score fluctuations on an easy test than on a hard one, because even one good or bad guess will make a big difference on an easy test.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
Founder
Founder
User avatar
V
Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 18003
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V42
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jun 2019, 08:38
Ian, that makes two of us ;)

My understanding is that beyond Tests 1 and 2, Tests 3, 4, 5, and 6 have just the number of questions for that test - e.g. 31 so the depth of the question bank is non-existent. Whereas Tests 1 & 2 have a very large database of questions. Again, if someone has a diff experience, please correct me
_________________
Founder of GMAT Club

Just starting out with GMAT? Start here...
Want to know application stats & Profiles from last year? Check the Decision Tracker
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jun 2012
Posts: 5
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jun 2019, 11:01
I understand we have concluded that the new GMAC software offers the same scoring algorithm as the actual GMAT, however, has anyone concluded if the GMAC software provides experimental questions just like the real GMAT exam. Theoretically, even if the scoring algorithm is the "same" these strategies wouldn't hold a lot of weight come test time, as you could be guessing/skipping questions which are experimental and thus do not count towards your score and vise versa.
GMAT Tutor
avatar
G
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1834
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jun 2019, 11:40
jkohn wrote:
I understand we have concluded that the new GMAC software offers the same scoring algorithm as the actual GMAT, however, has anyone concluded if the GMAC software provides experimental questions just like the real GMAT exam. Theoretically, even if the scoring algorithm is the "same" these strategies wouldn't hold a lot of weight come test time, as you could be guessing/skipping questions which are experimental and thus do not count towards your score and vise versa.


I'm not sure what "strategies" you're deriving from posts in this thread, but if they're based on when in the test you find a question, the results of the experiments posted here could lead you to make some incorrect conclusions. It's not true that question #5 has a certain "weight" and question #10 has a different "weight". The weighting of questions is based on how difficult each question is, and the difficulty level of question #5 and question #10 will usually be very different from one test to the next. The best strategy on the GMAT is to answer the questions you can answer, and don't use up a lot of time if you can't see how to get to an answer.

There aren't very many experimental questions on the GMAT any more, incidentally - there are only 3 in the Quant section, for example -- so whether the software tests mimic their presence or not won't make a huge difference. Experimental questions are inserted in your real test at positions that are determined completely at random just before your section starts, so they show up in different places for everyone.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Apr 2019
Posts: 9
GMAT 1: 770 Q47 V51
NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Jun 2019, 01:34
bb wrote:
Thanks Ian! Fully agree with you.

So the assumption of your statement or perhaps my inference of it, is that Test 6 is made up of mostly easy questions. Which therefore means that comparing one's results from Test 6 to other tests, such as 1 or 2 which have access to a deeper DB of questions, is not apples to apples comparison. Moreover, Test 6 also a diff experience from the Official GMAT which is more like Tests 1 & 2.

Thanks!
B.


IanStewart wrote:
AnirbanGmat wrote:
I gave Prep 6 with only 3 questions wrong in Quants, wrong question nos are 21, 28 and 31. But I got a Q49 with 75 percentile.
I have also got Q49 in Preps 1,2 & 5 but the no:of wrong questions were around 9,10 & 8.

So, why did my score not improve in Prep 6?


One of my concerns about the experiments in this thread is that they give the profoundly misleading impression that the scoring algorithm cares for some reason which question numbers you get right and which you get wrong - I'm afraid this thread can give the impression that the algorithm gives a certain weight to say question #10, and a different weight to question #15. That's simply not true - the algorithm doesn't care about question number at all. It cares about question difficulty. And the difficulty of each specific question varies a lot from test to test.

When a test is full of very hard questions, you can still get a very strong score with many wrong answers, because even a Q49 level test taker is not expected to get Q50-Q51 questions right too often. But when a test is full of easy questions, you need to be almost perfect to get a strong score, because a Q49 level test taker is expected to get a Q29 level question right almost every time. The free official practice tests have a lot of hard questions in the database, so they're often very forgiving of wrong answers. But when you buy the additional tests, you can exhaust the supply of hard questions, and then you can end up taking tests consisting mostly of easy/medium questions. That's what happened in your case: you had a test with lower level questions, and needed to be nearly perfect to get a good score. Notice that doesn't actually affect your score at all -- you got a Q49 just as before -- but it does affect the number of wrong answers you can have and still get a Q49.

On the real test, the question bank will be deep enough that it should feel like your early GMATPrep tests - you'll likely see a lot of hard questions, and you'll be able to get a Q49 or Q50 with several wrong answers.


I agree that Test 6 is easier than the others. I had 11 wrong on quant which dropped me to a Q47, while I had managed a Q48 with 13 incorrect on Test 2.

Verbal also had the same issue. I had 2 wrong and got a V47, when a V48 was possible with 3 wrong on Test 1.

At the time I took Test 6, I had done every other test except 5 without resetting. If this theory holds, the penalty for getting questions wrong will also be harsh.

Posted from my mobile device
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 17 Jul 2018
Posts: 406
Premium Member Reviews Badge
NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2019, 13:33
souvik101990 wrote:
New Format - Verbal What-If Scenarios


Last year when Vercules ran the what-if scenarios in this thread we found some very interesting results. Not that the GMAT has changed (or just reduced in number and minutes), I decided to make some changes. I thought of doing things in quarters (9 out of 36 questions form a quarter).

1. Importance of the first 9 questions


In the first part of the test, I have tried to see what happens if we miss the first quarter entirely (i.e. the first 9 out of the 36 questions answered wrongly while answering correctly the others). To check for experimental questions and other question level based biases I ran the scenario thrice.

Experiment - GMAC says the first 10 questions are as important as the other questions. We test that theory. We have changed it to 9 because we want to take into account the reduced number of questions in the test.

Methodology - Run 3 instances of A) missing the first 9 questions . B) answering the next 27 questions correctly.

Result

- V28, V29, V30

Analysis - To make this analysis more effective, let's first check the scenarios:

First Scenario - Missed the first 9 questions - 4 CRs, 4 SCs and 1 RC - V29 - 57th Percentile
Second Scenario - Missed the first 9 questions - 5 RCs, 3 SCs and 1 CR - V28 - 52nd Percentile
Third Scenario - Missed the first 9 questions - 2 RC, 3 SC and 4 CRs - V30 -59th Percentile

It appears that there's no pattern to when the first RC will appear. In the second test, the RC was as early as the third question and as a result it made me miss the entire RC, which, I think, contributed to the score decline more than the other two tests. Also, while the average difficulty of the test was pretty easy/medium, I did see a few questions with 35%-55% difficulty on GMAT Club which will easily include them in the 700-800 level category.

Last year missing the first 11 questions resulted in the V22 (27th percentile)

Importance of the last 9 questions


Experiment In the second part, I decided to see what happens when you mark every question in the test, save the last 9 questions, correctly. Not to my surprise, I got a V40 or above every single time.

Methodology Run 3 instances of missing the last 9 questions on purpose but everything else marked correctly.

Result V40, V42, V42

Analysis In the first scenario the 9 questions I missed were - 1 entire RC (3 questions), 4 SC and 2 CR. In the second scenario, I missed 6 RC questions each. Clearly, even though RC questions are more on the test, missing SC and CR questions wrongly makes a bigger dent in the score.

Sidenote Last year, missing the 11 questions at the end resulted in a score of V38. So it is definitely a good news for test takers :)

3. Guessing SC but marking everything else correctly


This time we did a sectional test to see what happens if I guess all SC questions but mark everything else correctly.

Methodology: Mark CR and RC questions correctly and mark C for all SC questions.

Result: V37 with 11 questions answered wrongly.

Guessing RC and marking everything else correctly


In similar fashion, I wanted to check what happens when we guess RC but keep the SC and CR answers correct. Surprising results follow!

Methodology: Mark CR and SC correctly but mark all RC questions C.

Result - SHOCKING V34

Analysis: It is pretty clear that RC matters a whole lot more now than it used to. I would advise with caution against using this strategy. Practice your RCs and go well prepared.



How about a normal scenario, because let's face it no one will get first 20 or first 10 and last 10 correct

Like a random distribution based on question type
CR,RC,SC

then sub dividing
inference, pp etc for RC
plan, analyse etc for CR
meaning/communication, grammar for SC

Along with a timing scenario
more than average time spent on wrong question types
nearly average time on others

A more realistic scenario would yield varied results trust me. I got a Q45 with only 6 wrong, that too well distributed and only 2 in sequence, the test is questionable if not its questions. bb souvik101990 Bunuel
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Sep 2013
Posts: 90
Location: India
GPA: 4
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jul 2019, 23:01
Hi bb , i beg to differ. I was under the impression that test 1&2 have a deep question bank and hence decided to write the test again from a different account. What astonished me the most was the fact that, i encountered same 3 RCS, and many sentence correction questions didn't even change their place on the question. Infact 70%of the questions were at the same location.

I thought that could be because i scored similar in previous test, so i did a different experiment. In the same test, i deliberately answered every quant question wrong. And to my utter surprise, first 20 questions were again the same. Questions started differing from 21 onwards and in the end, i saw completely different questions with poor level of difficulty.

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2019
Posts: 4
NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Aug 2019, 01:26
Hi All,

It is great to see the information/opinions you people are sharing in this forum. I need help if someone can guide me a bit.
I took my first GMAT in Sep 2017 and scored 640 without any preparation (Just OG and 2 GPrep Tests). That time I was not so serious about MBA as I am now. This time since May 2019 I am preparing for GMAT and started taking GPreps since July 2019.
My Gpreps scores were:

Gprep 1 : 740 (Q50 V40) 17th July
Gprep 2 : 660 (Q44 V37) 20th July.(Was not well and took medicine before the test so I feel maybe that hampered my performance.
rest cant say!)

Gprep 5: 710 (Q46 V41) 25th July
Gprep 6: 700 (Q49 V34) 26th July

Gprep 3: 700 (Q50 V35) 1st Aug
Grpep 4: 720 (Q50 V36) 3rd Aug



All Gpreps were taken in test conditions i.e. breaks and all. I attempted verbal as the first section, quants second and afterward IR and AWA. Also, All Gpreps were separate and no question was a repeat of any earlier. Just before the test day, I don't know what happened but I was quite tensed. I even caught a cold due to some weather allergy. On my test day, I had to take a medicine for allergy (Allegra) so as to stop sneezing.

I was tensed before my test and as the first question popped up on my screen I was blank i.e. it was an SC question and I took 3 minutes to answer it! I was panicking in my verbal section this whole time and messed it up big time. After the first break when I started Quants even then I was panicking though somewhat less than Verbal. I felt Verbal and Quants questions to be harder than those in Gpreps. I don't know even that If felt questions to be harder because I was panicking or they were hard in actual! My final scores were: 610, V26 Q48. I didn't accept my scores as this was not I expect from myself. I am planning to retake the GMAT around 21st of August now.

Any piece of advice or suggestion?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 May 2019
Posts: 10
NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2019, 11:31
Assuming that my incorrect answers are evenly distributed and the difficulty level is at normal level as same as other test-takers, are my estimated scores below correct?

Quant: Incorrect answers : Score
0-1 : 51
2-5 : 50
6-10: 49

Verbal: Incorrect answers : Score
6 : 42
8 : 40
10 : 38
12 : 35

In short, to get a 700+ (Q50, V36) I need to maintain maximum 5 incorrect in Quant and 10 incorrect in Verbal?

Posted from my mobile device
GMAT Tutor
avatar
G
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1834
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2019, 17:44
1
fudetra wrote:
Assuming that my incorrect answers are evenly distributed and the difficulty level is at normal level as same as other test-takers, are my estimated scores below correct?

Quant: Incorrect answers : Score
0-1 : 51
2-5 : 50
6-10: 49


No, it will depend entirely on how hard the questions on your test are, overall. I've seen people get Q50s on GMATPrep tests (the 37 question tests) with 13 wrong answers, for example - that can happen when the question bank is full of very hard questions. Then a test taker can get a lot of Q51-level questions wrong, but everything else right, and still get a Q50. But when the question bank is full of mostly easy or medium level questions, which can be true for some of the tests that have a small question database (this seems to be true in some Exam Pack tests), then each wrong answer is much more consequential. For those tests, your table might be fairly accurate. On the real test, it should normally be true that the question bank is large enough that the test can deliver many hard questions, so you should have a lot more latitude to get wrong answers, if you're aiming for a Q50, than your table would suggest, provided those wrong answers are only on the hardest questions. In fact, I think if you only made 5 mistakes (or fewer), you'd be almost guaranteed to get a Q50, but you should also be able to get a Q50 with many more wrong answers than that.

There's a much more predictable correspondence between number of wrong answers and Verbal scores at the top extreme of the scoring scale, though once you get below perhaps the V41 level or so, I don't think you'll find a very strong correlation (until you get down near the bottom of the scale). What's going to then matter is the difficulty level of a test taker's right and wrong answers, and not the sheer number of right and wrong answers.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
Director
Director
User avatar
P
Status: Professional GMAT Tutor
Affiliations: AB, cum laude, Harvard University (Class of '02)
Joined: 10 Jul 2015
Posts: 702
Location: United States (CA)
Age: 39
GMAT 1: 770 Q47 V48
GMAT 2: 730 Q44 V47
GMAT 3: 750 Q50 V42
GRE 1: Q168 V169
WE: Education (Education)
NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 12 Aug 2019, 23:47
2
Top Contributor
1
fudetra wrote:
Assuming that my incorrect answers are evenly distributed and the difficulty level is at normal level as same as other test-takers, are my estimated scores below correct?

Quant: Incorrect answers : Score
0-1 : 51
2-5 : 50
6-10: 49

Verbal: Incorrect answers : Score
6 : 42
8 : 40
10 : 38
12 : 35

In short, to get a 700+ (Q50, V36) I need to maintain maximum 5 incorrect in Quant and 10 incorrect in Verbal?

Here are some estimates based on the hundreds of student ESRs from actual GMATs (not the GMATPrep software, which has a much different scoring algorithm) that I've seen thus far.

VERBAL (30 counted questions per test)

51 = 0 wrong
48 = 1 wrong
47 = 2 or 3 wrong
46 = 3 wrong
42 = 5 wrong
40 = 7-10 wrong
35 = as few as 8 wrong or as many as 12 wrong, depending on where you get them wrong (see below)
etc.

QUANT (28 counted questions per test)

0-2 wrong: 51 (96%)
1-6 wrong: 50 (86%)
4-7 wrong: 49 (75%)
5-8 wrong: 48 (69%)
6-9 wrong: 47 (63%)
6-10 wrong: 46 (60%)
7-11 wrong: 45 (57%)
7-12 wrong: 44 (52%)
etc.

Sources: here and here and here and here

-Brian
_________________
Harvard grad and 99% GMAT scorer, offering expert, private GMAT tutoring and coaching worldwide since 2002.

One of the only known humans to have taken the GMAT 5 times and scored in the 700s every time (700, 710, 730, 750, 770), including verified section scores of Q50 / V47, as well as personal bests of 8/8 IR (2 times), 6/6 AWA (4 times), 50/51Q and 48/51V.

You can download my official test-taker score report (all scores within the last 5 years) directly from the Pearson Vue website: https://tinyurl.com/y7knw7bt Date of Birth: 09 December 1979.

GMAT Action Plan and Free E-Book - McElroy Tutoring

Contact: mcelroy@post.harvard.edu (I do not respond to PMs on GMAT Club) or find me on reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/GMATpreparation

Originally posted by mcelroytutoring on 12 Aug 2019, 21:28.
Last edited by mcelroytutoring on 12 Aug 2019, 23:47, edited 3 times in total.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 May 2019
Posts: 10
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2019, 23:29
IanStewart wrote:
fudetra wrote:
Assuming that my incorrect answers are evenly distributed and the difficulty level is at normal level as same as other test-takers, are my estimated scores below correct?

Quant: Incorrect answers : Score
0-1 : 51
2-5 : 50
6-10: 49


No, it will depend entirely on how hard the questions on your test are, overall. I've seen people get Q50s on GMATPrep tests (the 37 question tests) with 13 wrong answers, for example - that can happen when the question bank is full of very hard questions. Then a test taker can get a lot of Q51-level questions wrong, but everything else right, and still get a Q50. But when the question bank is full of mostly easy or medium level questions, which can be true for some of the tests that have a small question database (this seems to be true in some Exam Pack tests), then each wrong answer is much more consequential. For those tests, your table might be fairly accurate. On the real test, it should normally be true that the question bank is large enough that the test can deliver many hard questions, so you should have a lot more latitude to get wrong answers, if you're aiming for a Q50, than your table would suggest, provided those wrong answers are only on the hardest questions. In fact, I think if you only made 5 mistakes (or fewer), you'd be almost guaranteed to get a Q50, but you should also be able to get a Q50 with many more wrong answers than that.

There's a much more predictable correspondence between number of wrong answers and Verbal scores at the top extreme of the scoring scale, though once you get below perhaps the V41 level or so, I don't think you'll find a very strong correlation (until you get down near the bottom of the scale). What's going to then matter is the difficulty level of a test taker's right and wrong answers, and not the sheer number of right and wrong answers.

I got you point. People who aim at 700+ would normally be expected to get 100% correct in 600- level questions, and a minimum of 85% & 75% correct questions in 600+ level (or even 650+ level) in Quant & Verbal respectively.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 09 May 2017
Posts: 191
Location: Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Aug 2019, 23:18
I do not read all comment... IF you can please decipher ALL other exam pack 3-6
_________________
behind your feelings there is nothing, but behind every principle is a promise. "Eric"
I used a lot of LSAT CR. At the same time it was important to switch back to GMAT CR before exam
because reasoning is different and you need to adjust your CR skills to GMAT .
https://gmatclub.com/forum/killer-rc-the-10-hardest-reading-comprehension-passages-of-all-time-302318.html#p2334505
https://gmatclub.com/forum/bunuel-signature-collection-the-next-generation-170062.html
GMAT Club Bot
Re: NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios   [#permalink] 24 Aug 2019, 23:18

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   [ 78 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

NEW FORMAT GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderator: DisciplinedPrep






Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne