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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
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To me doing the first word split itself gave the answer. The subject is 'approaches' so the 'was' in B and D is incorrect.

Among the remaining three options, the construction 'X revolutionized something' is much better than 'X was revolutionary for something'. Thus the answer is C.
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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
Ajax1 wrote:
To me doing the first word split itself gave the answer. The subject is 'approaches' so the 'was' in B and D is incorrect.

Among the remaining three options, the construction 'X revolutionized something' is much better than 'X was revolutionary for something'. Thus the answer is C.



Is X was revolutionary wrong or unidiomatic?
any other reason for ignoring A and E
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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
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wastedyouth wrote:

Is X was revolutionary wrong or unidiomatic?
any other reason for ignoring A and E

A - 'inspiration in' is incorrect. It is inspiration 'to' or inspiration 'for'.

E - The use of 'that' after a comma is incorrect because 'that' is always restrictive.
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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
pqhai wrote:
Good question to practice. :) The question sticks with basic grammars tested in real GMAT.

Note:"THAT" never + comma. The rule is: Use THAT (and no commas) if the modifier is essential.

Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approaches to process control were revolutionary for post-war industrial practices in Japan, was an inspiration in several American management philosophies, that included Total Quality Management and Six Sigma, that only became popular during the twilight of his life

A were revolutionary for post-war industrial practices in Japan, was an inspiration in several American management philosophies, that included Total Quality Management and Six Sigma, that only became popular
Wrong. "THAT" never + comma. The rule is: Use THAT (and no commas) if the modifier is essential.

B was revolutionary for post-war industrial practices in Japan, inspired several American management philosophies, that included Total Quality Management and Six Sigma, that became popular
Wrong.
- "THAT" never + comma. The rule is: Use THAT (and no commas) if the modifier is essential.
- S-V agreement. "was" is wrong.

C revolutionized post-war industrial practices in Japan, inspired several American management philosophies, such as Total Quality Management and Six Sigma that became popular
Correct.

D was revolutionary in post-war industrial practices in Japan, was an inspiration for several American management philosophies, including Total Quality Management and Six Sigma, which became popular
Wrong. S-V agreement problem.

E were revolutionary in post-war industrial practices in Japan, inspired several American management philosophies, that included Total Quality Management and Six Sigma, which became popular
Wrong. "THAT" never + comma. The rule is: Use THAT (and no commas) if the modifier is essential.

Hope it helps.


Can you please explain what is essential modifier??
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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
was able to eliminate b and d, but a and e i got stuck up,indeed the problem is use of that and comma.So test of rules here...
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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
pqhai wrote:
wastedyouth wrote:
Can you please explain what is essential modifier??


Hello wastedyouth.

I'm glad to explain.

The modifier is essential if you remove it, the sentence is not able to keep its intended meaning. That is opposite to Non-essential modifier that you could remove it without meaning changes.

For example:
I bought a new book that was the best selling book last week.
"that was the best selling book last week" is ESSENTIAL because if you remove that part, the sentence - I bought a new book - does not convey the intended meaning. (I just bought the best selling book, not generic book).

Another example:
Our new CEO, who used to be an MBA professor, is very smart.
"who used to be an MBA professor" is NON-ESSENTIAL modifier because the core meaning is that "the new CEO is really smart". So you can remove the modifier without meaning changes.

Take away:
ESSENTIAL modifier + NO comma
NON-ESSENTIAL modifier + Commas
'THAT" is used for ESSENTIAL modifier only.

Hope it helps.


Means in this ques included Total Quality Management and Six Sigma is essential modfier???
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Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
Can somebody please answer these questions?

1. ------
Take away:
ESSENTIAL modifier + NO comma
NON-ESSENTIAL modifier + Commas
'THAT" is used for ESSENTIAL modifier only.
--------

Really? GMAT checks this?
Maybe somebody can also tell when does GMAT look at correct using of commas?

2. Will option E be correct if we remove comma before "that"?

E were revolutionary in post-war industrial practices in Japan, inspired several American management philosophies that included Total Quality Management and Six Sigma, which became popular

3. (specifying 2nd quesion). Such use of "which" - is it ok? Or "which" modifies only Six Sigma ---> wrong?
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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
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Re: Noted statistical consultant W. Edwards Deming, whose approa [#permalink]
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