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OG'16 SC Question

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OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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54% (00:40) correct 46% (01:11) wrong based on 223 sessions

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Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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In the idiom as x as y, how is 'likely to exceed the proposed speed limit' parallel to 'they are'?
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2016, 09:36
Correct Idiom is as likely to. Thus, only option E uses the correct idiom.

Also, I believe here They is referring to drivers.

in A, current one refers to Speed limit which is illogical.
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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abhimahna wrote:
Correct Idiom is as likely to. Thus, only option E uses the correct idiom.

Also, I believe here They is referring to drivers.

in A, current one refers to Speed limit which is illogical.

E doesn't end well- "they are the current one"

Though 'they' in D comes a little early, idiom as...as fits in correctly.

D seems like a better answer.

OA?

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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2016, 03:17
abhimahna wrote:
Correct Idiom is as likely to. Thus, only option E uses the correct idiom.

Also, I believe here They is referring to drivers.

in A, current one refers to Speed limit which is illogical.


Agreed that the correct idiom is 'as likely to', but should it not be 'as x as y' where x is 'likely to exceed the proposed speed limit' and y is 'they are to exceed the current one'?

Because "as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one" sounds awkward
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


1. The intended sentence is-- Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are (likely to exceed) the current one. We may note the ellipsis here in full action for the sake of concision. Therefore, the Answer choice E is indeed complete.


2.The first step is to eliminate all the choices that miss the action verb in the second part, namely, ‘are’. Missing the verbal word will render the comparison wrong by treating the proposed speed itself as the current one. Then the essence of proposed loses relevance. Hence A, C and E can be dumped.
Now comes the idiom ‘as X as Y’ into play, wherein ‘as…. As’ is an essential ingredient. Hence, -will be equally likely to do x as they are Y -- is unidiomatic. As likely to do x as they are Y is the correct idiom. Therefore E.
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2016, 16:08
daagh wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


1. The intended sentence is-- Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are (likely to exceed) the current one. We may note the ellipsis here in full action for the sake of concision. Therefore, the Answer choice E is indeed complete.


2.The first step is to eliminate all the choices that miss the action verb in the second part, namely, ‘are’. Missing the verbal word will render the comparison wrong by treating the proposed speed itself as the current one. Then the essence of proposed loses relevance. Hence A, C and E can be dumped.
Now comes the idiom ‘as X as Y’ into play, wherein ‘as…. As’ is an essential ingredient. Hence, -will be equally likely to do x as they are Y -- is unidiomatic. As likely to do x as they are Y is the correct idiom. Therefore E.


Daagh i think you wanted to dump D not E)
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OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2016, 02:08
Hi, Dont you think in the ans choice "as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are", "they are" should be replaced with " they do" because "as they do the current one" will be more appropriate?
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2017, 23:27
hildi wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are




How can THEY not be ambiguous in E

please explain
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OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2017, 23:37
rocko911 wrote:

How can THEY not be ambiguous in E

please explain


Because pronoun ambiguity is the last thing you should look for. And, even if you look for, there must be splits between :
1. a pronoun and a noun
2. a singular pronoun and a plural pronoun
3. the presence and absence of pronoun - this is bit more complicated, because this can signal other requirements [ for example, here its comparison]

So, don't rely on pronoun ambiguity, unless you have a sentence such as : Jim and Jack went to the market and he....

Now, directly coming to your question, "they" is not ambiguous because of parallelism.

... that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are [likely to exceed] the current one.

Cheers !!
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2017, 23:45
rocko911 wrote:
How can THEY not be ambiguous in E

Hi rocko911, yes, you could view this as pronoun ambiguity, but a couple of things:

i) Pronoun ambiguity is acceptable on GMAT. So, don't use this as a criterion to eliminate answer choices.

ii) Structurally, they is referring to drivers (since both are subjects of their respective clauses).

For test takers, it's important to understand the difference between an orphan pronoun (pronoun with no antecedent) and ambiguous pronoun (pronoun with multiple antecedents).

Orphan pronoun is always incorrect, while ambiguous pronoun is acceptable.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Orphan and Ambiguous Pronouns, their applications and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2017, 23:55
godot53 wrote:
rocko911 wrote:

How can THEY not be ambiguous in E

please explain


Because pronoun ambiguity is the last thing you should look for. And, even if you look for, there must be splits between :
1. a pronoun and a noun
2. a singular pronoun and a plural pronoun
3. the presence and absence of pronoun - this is bit more complicated, because this can signal other requirements [ for example, here its comparison]

So, don't rely on pronoun ambiguity, unless you have a sentence such as : Jim and Jack went to the market and he....

Now, directly coming to your question, "they" is not ambiguous because of parallelism.




... that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are [likely to exceed] the current one.

Cheers !!



But in this question

https://gmatclub.com/forum/marconi-s-co ... 06328.html

how can the answer be C?

IT can really refer to either of them....Is there any good way I can understand if I need to use pronoun ambiguity or not?
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OG'16 SC Question [#permalink]

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rocko911 wrote:

But in this question

https://gmatclub.com/forum/marconi-s-co ... 06328.html

how can the answer be C?

IT can really refer to either of them....Is there any good way I can understand if I need to use pronoun ambiguity or not?


OG has multiple problems with this kind of ambiguity. Another one here - https://gmatclub.com/forum/while-depres ... 91967.html

So, I would reiterate what I have written, and I believe EducationAisle will also agree with me - Pronoun ambiguity is the last thing you should go for. Better, don't bother !!
If you compare MGMAT SC 4th or 5th edition to their latest edition, they have completely ignored this very ambiguity issue. That proves a lot !!

Now, coming to the Marconi's problem - If you consider the split in the last portion - "instead, it is"/"but which is"/"instead, it has become"/"which has become"/ "other than what it is," -- Does this in any way test ambiguity issue ? Instead, I see split between "is" vs "has become".. which seem to be more useful. SC is all about elimination looking for broad errors, signaled by splits, and not backward justifications.

Cheers !!
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OG'16 SC Question   [#permalink] 12 Sep 2017, 00:29
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