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Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2018, 19:01
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#MY10SECAPPROACH :
Equally likely is redundant , hence must be avoided - throws out option A,B & C.
Likely always carries "TO" as a conjunction , hence even option D is out - leaving answer choice option E.
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Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 07 May 2019, 12:25
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Hello Everyone!

This is a great example of a GMAT question that has to do with comparisons! Before we dive in, here is the original question with any major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

After a quick glance over the options, 2 major differences jumped out:

1. equally likely vs. as likely
2. as vs. as they are


Let's start with #1 on our list: equally likely vs. as likely. The proper idiomatic structure for each of these options are:

equally likely X and Y will happen (suggests both events will happen at the same time)
as likely X will happen as Y will happen (suggests that both events happen at separate times, but could end up turning out the same)

Since ALL of the options use some version of the phrase "as Y will happen" at the end of each one, we know that the first half of the comparison MUST include the "as likely X will happen" for the idiom to be complete.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

Therefore, we can eliminate options A, B, and C because they don't follow either idiom structure correctly.

Now, we're only left with options D and E! Let's now focus on #2: as vs. as they are. To make this a little easier to spot, I added in the non-underlined portion of the sentence to each option:

(D) Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

This option is INCORRECT because the wording of this is confusing and awkward. The phrase "that they will exceed" is not only written poorly, but also it might confuse readers into thinking we're now talking about traffic safety officials exceeding the speed limit, rather than the drivers!

(E) Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.

This option is CORRECT! It uses the right idiom structure "as likely that X will happen as Y will happen." It's also absolutely clear that the pronoun "they" is referring only to the drivers!

There you go - option E is our correct choice!


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Originally posted by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 17 Oct 2018, 14:05.
Last edited by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 07 May 2019, 12:25, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2018, 20:25
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as THEY ARE the current one.

Can someone explain "THEY ARE" refers to what? the drivers or speed limits?

"Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will most likely exceed the proposed speed limit as with the (or just like) current speed limit." <--- is this sentence written right?

Thank You!
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2018, 22:38
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Quote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

Jaytan1 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as THEY ARE the current one.

Can someone explain "THEY ARE" refers to what? the drivers or speed limits?

Jaytan1 , sometimes it helps to simplify (shorten) the sentence and then "put back in" the words that have been omitted
Please note that speed limit is singular.

Simplify and replace
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as THEY ARE the current one.

Now we have
Drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.

Find the verb or verb phrase that follows the first AS: likely to exceed

Place that phrase back into the sentence. Such placement may be enough to find the correct answer.
Drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are likely to exceed the current one.

• Still not clear? Then find the antecedent for "one."
-- One is a pronoun that indicates a single, definite part of a group of a collection.
-- Nikolai wanted to test drive the Ferrari. He had never driven one.

One is singular. In form, "one" can refer only to "speed limit."

Drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are likely to exceed the current speed limit.

So . . . who or what is likely to be exceeding any speed limits?
The drivers?
Or the speed limit? :-D

Pronoun ambiguity allowed if the antecedent is obvious.

On the GMAT, if more than one noun can be the antecedent of the pronoun,
but context and logic make it clear which noun the pronoun SHOULD refer to, GMAC allows it.
Quote:
"Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will most likely exceed the proposed speed limit as with the (or just like) current speed limit." <--- is this sentence written right?

Thank You!

No, the sentence is not written correctly.
You are close, though. You could write:

• Correct: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will BE AS likely TO exceed the proposed speed limit as [drivers are likely to exceed] the current speed limit.
• Correct: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will BE AS likely TO exceed the proposed speed limit as the current speed limit.
The comparison must maintain the AS ________ AS words — literally, we have to repeat AS.

• Correct: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will most likely exceed the proposed speed limit, just AS they do the current speed limit.
This time we have omitted "exceed" and replaced it with "do."

(Yes, I have purposely avoided the word "with.")

Hope that helps.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2018, 05:35
i choose e
but e is still wrong. e is still not parallel. this mistake is tested on gmat questions
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2018, 21:22
generis wrote:
Quote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

Jaytan1 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as THEY ARE the current one.

Can someone explain "THEY ARE" refers to what? the drivers or speed limits?

Jaytan1 , sometimes it helps to simplify (shorten) the sentence and then "put back in" the words that have been omitted
Please note that speed limit is singular.

Simplify and replace
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as THEY ARE the current one.

Now we have
Drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.

Find the verb or verb phrase that follows the first AS: likely to exceed

Place that phrase back into the sentence. Such placement may be enough to find the correct answer.
Drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are likely to exceed the current one.

• Still not clear? Then find the antecedent for "one."
-- One is a pronoun that indicates a single, definite part of a group of a collection.
-- Nikolai wanted to test drive the Ferrari. He had never driven one.

One is singular. In form, "one" can refer only to "speed limit."

Drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are likely to exceed the current speed limit.

So . . . who or what is likely to be exceeding any speed limits?
The drivers?
Or the speed limit? :-D

Pronoun ambiguity allowed if the antecedent is obvious.

On the GMAT, if more than one noun can be the antecedent of the pronoun,
but context and logic make it clear which noun the pronoun SHOULD refer to, GMAC allows it.
Quote:
"Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will most likely exceed the proposed speed limit as with the (or just like) current speed limit." <--- is this sentence written right?

Thank You!

No, the sentence is not written correctly.
You are close, though. You could write:

• Correct: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will BE AS likely TO exceed the proposed speed limit as [drivers are likely to exceed] the current speed limit.
• Correct: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will BE AS likely TO exceed the proposed speed limit as the current speed limit.
The comparison must maintain the AS ________ AS words — literally, we have to repeat AS.

• Correct: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will most likely exceed the proposed speed limit, just AS they do the current speed limit.
This time we have omitted "exceed" and replaced it with "do."

(Yes, I have purposely avoided the word "with.")

Hope that helps.


Great Explanations, Thank You.

The way I thought was (since the entire GMAT is sort of reasoning test) to identify whether its a comparison sentence or cause & effect sentence.
X is the same as Y
X is as bad as Y
Drivers most likely exceed the proposed speed limit, as they exceed the current speed limit.


The sentence "Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are likely to exceed the current one."
appear grammatically correct, however, it makes no sense. Because whether the current speed limit is being violated or not is a fact; its not a 'are likely to exceed" factor.
In order to predict future likeliness one should know whether the current (and past) speed limit is being exceeded or not.
So the answer (E) is Illogical!
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2019, 06:49
ritjn2003 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.


(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


Traffic Safety Officials

(A) Comparison (equally likely)

(B) Comparison (equally likely)

(C) Comparison (equally likely that)

(D) Comparison (as likely that)

(E) CORRECT


First glance

The underline starts with either equally likely or as likely. The wording signals some kind of comparison.

Issues

(1) Comparison: equally likely (that); as likely that

Which is the proper form for this sentence, equally likely or as likely?

Equally likely can be used in this form: Priti and Ahmad are equally likely to succeed on the test. In this example, the two members of the comparison are grouped together: they are both equally likely to do something.

As likely is used in this form: Priti is as likely to perform well on the test as Ahmad is. In this form, the comparison is split into a more classic structure: X is as likely (to do something) as Y is.

All five answer choices use the second as, so the correct comparison idiom is as likely as. Eliminate choices (A), (B), and (C).

The answer choices also split between that and to:

equally likely (that / to)

as likely (that / to)

In both cases, the correct comparison idiom uses the word to, not the word that. Eliminate choices (C) and (D).

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (E) uses the proper comparison idiom as likely to X as Y.



here as we are comparing two situations for reporting different conditions use of as .... as structure . it best conveys the meaning .
In D the that clause acts a subordinate conjunction
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2019, 01:42
‘equally…as’ is unidiomatic, so A B and C are all wrong. Out of the remaining two E is clearly the right option as, D is also unidiomatic. The correct form is ‘as likely to’.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2019, 22:14
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i am just paraphrasing all the answers quoting wrong ones . Do correct me if i am wrong



1. as can compare clauses with noun phrases - please ignore one suggestion quoting otherwise
2. one can omit the tense, if the tense not changing , here we cannot as the tense is changing( hence option E introduces are)
3. pronoun ambiguity is acceptable (as logical antecedents can be found) in gmat, but not the pronount without antecedents.
4. both likely that and likely to are acceptable, but just look for the subject redundancy while using likely that ( here it is there in option D)
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2019, 23:26
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as to exceed the current one.

Is the above sentence correct? Why do we really need to put 'they are' if 'to exceed' is present? Agree that without 'to exceed' it will produce ambiguity.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2019, 01:31
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.


(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

Although Option E uses correct idom AS X AS Y; is the same parallel??

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2019, 08:25
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utkbits wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as to exceed the current one.

Is the above sentence correct? Why do we really need to put 'they are' if 'to exceed' is present? Agree that without 'to exceed' it will produce ambiguity.

The problem with that example is that both "to exceed the proposed speed limit" and "to exceed the current one" now match up with the future tense verb ("will be"). So it sounds as though drivers WILL be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they WILL BE to exceed the current one.

Obviously exceeding the current speed limit in the future doesn't make any sense. In this case, it's better to include "they ARE" to illustrate the different times of the two actions.

But don't hurt too many brain cells trying to come up with your own answer choices -- leave that part to GMAC. If you understand why (E) is the best choice here, then you've done your job. :)
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2019, 08:03
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.


(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

1. Equally likely….as ( Wrong)

(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

1. Equally likely….as ( Wrong)

(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

1. Equally likely….as ( Wrong)

(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

1. As likely as is correct
2. Wordy
3. As likely that( that is wrong here): Idiom (So Wrong)
4. By using that its changing the meaning and pronoun redundancy error

(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

1. As likely as is correct

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2019, 20:39
daagh wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


1. The intended sentence is-- Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are (likely to exceed) the current one. We may note the ellipsis here in full action for the sake of concision. Therefore, the Answer choice E is indeed complete.


2.The first step is to eliminate all the choices that miss the action verb in the second part, namely, ‘are’. Missing the verbal word will render the comparison wrong by treating the proposed speed itself as the current one. Then the essence of proposed loses relevance. Hence A, C and E can be dumped.
Now comes the idiom ‘as X as Y’ into play, wherein ‘as…. As’ is an essential ingredient. Hence, -will be equally likely to do x as they are Y -- is unidiomatic. As likely to do x as they are Y is the correct idiom. Therefore E.


I got stuck between A and E and eliminated E for the ambiguous use of "they". It could refer to the drivers or the officials. Where did I go wrong?
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2019, 18:25
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Rajeet123 wrote:
daagh wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


1. The intended sentence is-- Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are (likely to exceed) the current one. We may note the ellipsis here in full action for the sake of concision. Therefore, the Answer choice E is indeed complete.


2.The first step is to eliminate all the choices that miss the action verb in the second part, namely, ‘are’. Missing the verbal word will render the comparison wrong by treating the proposed speed itself as the current one. Then the essence of proposed loses relevance. Hence A, C and E can be dumped.
Now comes the idiom ‘as X as Y’ into play, wherein ‘as…. As’ is an essential ingredient. Hence, -will be equally likely to do x as they are Y -- is unidiomatic. As likely to do x as they are Y is the correct idiom. Therefore E.


I got stuck between A and E and eliminated E for the ambiguous use of "they". It could refer to the drivers or the officials. Where did I go wrong?

As pointed out in this post and as explained in this video, pronoun ambiguity isn’t an absolute rule.

There are several posts on this thread about (A), but two issues are:

    1) We want "as likely as", not "equally likely as".
    2) (A) seems to compare drivers to the current speed limit. I wouldn't eliminate based on that alone, but the comparison is much clearer in choice (E).

So, if you ignore the pronoun non-issue, (E) is the better choice!
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2019, 20:41
[quote="ritjn2003"]Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.


(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


this if official question and it is good to discuss thorough.

choice e is correct clearly. but i want to say something.
when the cut off phrase is in the middle of the second clause, we have, I think , an inferior pattern.

they are "likely to exceed" the current one

but "they are the current one" can be understood "the divers are curent one" and this is absurd.

if the ellipsis make misunderstanding, it is not good. choice e really offers a misunderstanding.

in majority of official questions, you will see that the cut off phrase is at the beginning or at the end of the second clause of comparison. this ellipsis makes no misunderstanding

comparison is about ellipsis. ellipsis is about whether it make misunderstanding. nothing is big here. it is just the discription and how we understand or misunderstand the phrase we read.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2020, 16:20
I get why answer choice A through D are wrong but wouldn't E be wrong as well? Based off parallelism.

as X as Y (doesn't what ever come after as in X have to parallel in Y, whether is noun with noun or verb with verb)

answer choice E.) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
"likely to" is a verb and "they" is a noun.

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2020, 07:32
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Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-

ritjn2003 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.


(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


Choice A: This answer choice incorrectly compares "the drivers" to "the current one"; This error is due to the omission of the verb in the second part of the comparison; when a comparison involves a tense shift, no verb can be omitted. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice B: This answer choice features the same error found in Option A. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice C: This answer choice utilizes the unidiomatic phrase "likely to"; furthermore, it is needlessly wordy and quite awkward due to the phrase "that they will". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice D: This answer choice repeats the same idiom-related error found in Option C. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice E: This answer choice maintains correct idiom use and conveys the intended meaning of the sentence. Thus, this answer choice is correct.

Hence, E is the best answer choice.

All the best!
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New post 24 Jan 2020, 22:42
ExpertsGlobal5 wrote:
Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-

ritjn2003 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.


(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are


Choice A: This answer choice incorrectly compares "the drivers" to "the current one"; This error is due to the omission of the verb in the second part of the comparison; when a comparison involves a tense shift, no verb can be omitted. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice B: This answer choice features the same error found in Option A. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice C: This answer choice utilizes the unidiomatic phrase "likely to"; furthermore, it is needlessly wordy and quite awkward due to the phrase "that they will". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice D: This answer choice repeats the same idiom-related error found in Option C. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice E: This answer choice maintains correct idiom use and conveys the intended meaning of the sentence. Thus, this answer choice is correct.

Hence, E is the best answer choice.

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Hi!

Can you explain why the idiom use in answer choice E is correct. Doesn't the word following "as" have to be parallel with the other word that follows the other second "as."

For example, "as X as Y." Doesn't X and Y have to be parallel. Either they are both nouns, verbs, or preposition.

as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are. This idiom does not show parallelism with "to" as a verb and "they" as a noun.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2020, 03:22
thealchemist89 wrote:
Doesn't the word following "as" have to be parallel with the other word that follows the other second "as."

Hi thealchemist89, for the most part, that would not happen, because in the idiom as X as Y, X and Y serve different purposes: X is generally an adjective (the attribute that the idiom is trying to emphasize), while Y is a noun (the entity whose attribute the idiom is comparing with).

For example;

He is as big as an elephant.

Big is an adjective while elephant is a noun.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely   [#permalink] 26 Jan 2020, 03:22

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