It is currently 24 Feb 2018, 10:20

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 14 Jun 2015
Posts: 91
Location: India
GMAT 1: 680 Q46 V37
GMAT 2: 750 Q50 V40
GPA: 3.5
WE: Information Technology (Telecommunications)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Nov 2015, 00:29
Wow this explanation is much helpful.. Got it..
thx very much TeamGMATIFY
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4327
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Jan 2016, 05:35
There are two examples akin to this topic: one, an original from OG verbal and another, simulated by Princeton

Quote:
OG's version --- OG #116.

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
The OA is B


Quote:
Princeton's
Out of this season's obsession with all things political have grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that are flooding the shops with t-shirts, bumper stickers and lapel pins.

A. things political have grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that are flooding
B. things political has grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that is flooding
C. things that are political has grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that floods
D. political things have grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that are flooding
E. political things has grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that floods
In this, also the OA is B.


Quote:
Now Kaplan’s is the next copycat with the order of the choices slightly changed)

Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing “regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

A. other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
B. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
C. another people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
D. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
E. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which bring
Kaplan’s OA is D. (the same as B in other questions)


This is Ron’s response to the Kaplan’s
Quote:
Lunarpower wrote in Beat theGMAT
ssgmatter wrote:
Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that are bringing "regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

(A) other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that are bringing
(B) other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that are bringing
(C) another person's life has grown a booming market for a "reality" television show that is bringing
(D) other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that is bringing
(E) other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that bring


this is a rip-off of OG11 #116... and not a very good one. a legitimate case could be made for either (b) or (d).

here's the analysis:

1) THE SUBJECT OF "HAS/HAVE GROWN" IS "A BOOMING MARKET"
the entire cluster of words that precedes this verb is a prepositional phrase, and so can't contain the subject. therefore, this must be a reverse construction, in which the subject comes after the verb.
the subject is, therefore "a booming market".

this is also the only subject that is reasonable in context -- nothing else in the sentence has "grown".)

therefore, the correct verb is "has".

simpler analogy:
on the table (is / are) two cell phones. ,
"on the table" isn't the subject (it's a prepositional phrase, so that's impossible). therefore, the subject, "two cell phones", FOLLOWS the verb. (the correct choice would be "are".)

--

2) THERE IS INSUFFICIENT CONTEXT TO DETERMINE THE SUBJECT OF "IS/ARE BRINGING"

...aaaaaaaannnnndd this is where we start to have a problem.

in the current context, BOTH of these are perfectly reasonable interpretations:

* the market (for reality tv shows) IS bringing people onto the screen increasingly frequently;
* the tv shows themselves ARE bringing people onto the screen increasingly frequently.

they're also both grammatical, since "that" modifiers have a certain degree of freedom in their application -- unlike "which" modifiers, they aren't constrained to modifying the closest noun. (see OG DIAGNOSTIC #50, in the 11th or 12th edition, for another example of a flexible "that" modifier.)

therefore, it is impossible to tell which of these is the intended subject -- both are reasonable in context -- and, therefore, it's impossible to determine whether the verb should be singular or plural.

therefore, either (b) or (d).

--

what's the source of this question?
you would think that people who are essentially copying an OG problem, and substituting different words, could, at least, make a problem with only one correct answer.
heh.


However, the takeaway seems to be that GMAC particularly is not so worried about the touch rule of ‘that’, as others are.
_________________

Can you solve at least some SC questions without delving into the initial statement?

Narendran 98845 44509

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 8
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Feb 2016, 14:42
I have the 2015 version of Kaplan, and OA is E....
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 8
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Feb 2016, 14:46
See pic below for explanation.
Attachments

14560083253471629359151.jpg
14560083253471629359151.jpg [ 2.51 MiB | Viewed 704 times ]

Expert Post
Verbal Expert
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3315
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Feb 2016, 21:41
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
plogod wrote:
See pic below for explanation.



The "intervening phrases and modifiers" would be frequently of the following types; identifying them may be useful to "keep track of the subject". The examples below are kept simple so as to aid in identifying / reducing more complex cases to such simple ones:

1. Prepositional phrase: The house beside the river was owned by John.
2. Subordinate clause modifier: The house that stands beside the river was owned by John.
3. Past participle phrase modifier: The house built beside the river was owned by John.
4. Present participle phrase modifier: The house standing beside the river was owned by John.
5. Absolute phrase modifier: The house - its colour not faded in years - is owned by John.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jul 2014
Posts: 2
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Feb 2016, 21:52
vibhav wrote:
Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing "regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

A. other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
B. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
C. another people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
D. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
E. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which bring

Guys please reason out your answer to this question!


The answer is D.
public interest in the singular subject and requires a singular verb 'has'. Further booming market also acts a singular subject and requires a singular verb is.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 8
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Feb 2016, 19:06
raviberlia wrote:
vibhav wrote:
Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing "regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

A. other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
B. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
C. another people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
D. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
E. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which bring

Guys please reason out your answer to this question!


The answer is D.
public interest in the singular subject and requires a singular verb 'has'. Further booming market also acts a singular subject and requires a singular verb is.



Wrong. The answer is E. "Which is bringing" should reference the television shows. Television shows is plural. (They bring, or they ARE BRINGING, not they IS BRINGING).
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Aug 2015
Posts: 105
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2016, 20:35
mehtakaustubh wrote:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw footed bathtub.

1.things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
2.things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
3.things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
4.antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture that are bringing
5.antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
[OG 10th Edition]



Prompt : - This is a sentence with the reverse side subject. Example: In the garage, there were two cars.

Choice A) Just like the cars were the subject in the prev sentence the , a market is the subject. So the plural verb in the choice A is incorrect. There is one more problem with choice A concerning that clause. --- market for bygone styles of furnitures and fixtures that are bringing. The question tries to trap us into thinking that the verb are is referring to the combined nouns furnitures and fixtures. However, the 'that' is modifying the noun market. So this part is again wrong.

Choice B) correct

Choice C) Again plural bring referring to the market.

Choice D and E again have similar problems just like A and C
1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4327
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Mar 2016, 08:22
1
This post received
KUDOS
The critical thing to decide here is, whether
1. it is a market that is bringing back
2. it is the bygone styles that are bringing back
3. it is the furniture or the fixtures that are bringing back
First grammar:
Considering that, a market is the true subject of the sentence, as all choices with the plural verb ‘have grown’ are out. So, let’s dump A and D.
Now, let’s move on to the meaning mode. The question is whether a market can bring back or bygone styles can bring back. The already bygone style cannot bring back the antique furniture. It should be only a growing market that can highlight a trend and cash in on it. Hence, we can reasonably make bold to drop C and E and go for B.
_________________

Can you solve at least some SC questions without delving into the initial statement?

Narendran 98845 44509

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Dec 2012
Posts: 134
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2016, 02:34
daagh wrote:
The critical thing to decide here is, whether
1. it is a market that is bringing back
2. it is the bygone styles that are bringing back
3. it is the furniture or the fixtures that are bringing back
First grammar:
Considering that, a market is the true subject of the sentence, as all choices with the plural verb ‘have grown’ are out. So, let’s dump A and D.
Now, let’s move on to the meaning mode. The question is whether a market can bring back or bygone styles can bring back. The already bygone style cannot bring back the antique furniture. It should be only a growing market that can highlight a trend and cash in on it. Hence, we can reasonably make bold to drop C and E and go for B.



I have a query here. Can "THAT" refer to the far away noun "THE MARKET" as the case here? Can you please help me on understanding the usage of THAT here, in this sentence.? Thanks.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4327
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2016, 03:32
Sowgaru
Hi
Let’s see it this way. You are referring to the structural placement of the pronoun that. I have tried to explain through the meaning. What happens when the word just prior to the pronoun happens to be not so appropriate in comparison to some other potentially eligible choice? In my opinion, both the inanimate fixtures and furniture and the bygone styles are not dynamic enough to reverse a bygone trend and resurrect it. On the contrary, a live and kicking market can do the trick.
_________________

Can you solve at least some SC questions without delving into the initial statement?

Narendran 98845 44509

Director
Director
User avatar
S
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 822
Location: Bangalore, India
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2016, 08:24
sowragu wrote:
I have a query here. Can "THAT" refer to the far away noun "THE MARKET" as the case here? Can you please help me on understanding the usage of THAT here, in this sentence.? Thanks.

daagh has already explained this from multiple perspectives.

Adding further, that, when used as a relative pronoun, can in fact refer to quite faraway nouns!

Following is an official question:

Written in ink or engraved by stylus, more than 2,000 letters and documents on wooden tablets excavated at the site of the old roman fort at vindolanda in northern England are yielding a historical account of the military garrison in the first and second centuries that is as vivid in its details of personal life as that gathered from Pompeii

Notice how that is modifying a really faraway noun: historical account.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses the usage of that, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id, I can mail the corresponding section.
_________________

Thanks,
Ashish (GMAT Faculty @ EducationAisle)
http://www.EducationAisle.com

Sentence Correction Nirvana available at Amazon.in and Flipkart

Now! Preview the entire Grammar Section of Sentence Correction Nirvana at pothi.com

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Aug 2015
Posts: 105
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2016, 19:28
EducationAisle wrote:
sowragu wrote:
I have a query here. Can "THAT" refer to the far away noun "THE MARKET" as the case here? Can you please help me on understanding the usage of THAT here, in this sentence.? Thanks.

daagh has already explained this from multiple perspectives.

Adding further, that, when used as a relative pronoun, can in fact refer to quite faraway nouns!

Following is an official question:

Written in ink or engraved by stylus, more than 2,000 letters and documents on wooden tablets excavated at the site of the old roman fort at vindolanda in northern England are yielding a historical account of the military garrison in the first and second centuries that is as vivid in its details of personal life as that gathered from Pompeii

Notice how that is modifying a really faraway noun: historical account.


p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses the usage of that, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id, I can mail the corresponding section.


Thanks EducationAisle.
From a grammatical standpoint, If we see a 'that' pronoun, should we ignore the nouns in the prepositional phrase preceding it ? Or there can be counter examples where that can actually refer to the noun in the preceding prepositional phrase. I have come up with an example below.

I bought a house in the town that is close to the sea beach

It causes some ambiguity right? Is house close close to beach or is it that it in a town that is close to the beach?
Director
Director
User avatar
S
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 822
Location: Bangalore, India
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2016, 22:11
ajdse22 wrote:
If we see a 'that' pronoun, should we ignore the nouns in the prepositional phrase preceding it ?

Not at all. There is pretty much no role of prepositional phrases, when you're looking at finding out the antecedent of that.

As I mentioned in my previous post, if you could PM me your mail id, I can send you the relevant section from our book. I can guarantee that you would never again go wrong with the usage of that :).

ajdse22 wrote:
I bought a house in the town that is close to the sea beach

It causes some ambiguity right? Is house close close to beach or is it that it in a town that is close to the beach?

I would say that it's very clear that the town is close to the sea beach.
_________________

Thanks,
Ashish (GMAT Faculty @ EducationAisle)
http://www.EducationAisle.com

Sentence Correction Nirvana available at Amazon.in and Flipkart

Now! Preview the entire Grammar Section of Sentence Correction Nirvana at pothi.com

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 27 Oct 2013
Posts: 38
Schools: Erasmus '17
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Jul 2016, 17:18
Minheequang wrote:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.
(A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
(C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
(D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring

The answer is (B). I have no problem with the meaning of this choice, but what is things antique. I can't understand its meaning or its structure: Noun + ADJ ???


Source of question?

I think a comma is missing.
Out of America's fascination with all things , antique

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

Out of America's fascination with all [u]things is subordinate clause
Expert Post
Verbal Expert
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3315
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jul 2016, 14:50
Expert's post
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
rahul202 wrote:
Minheequang wrote:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.
(A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
(C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
(D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring

The answer is (B). I have no problem with the meaning of this choice, but what is things antique. I can't understand its meaning or its structure: Noun + ADJ ???


Source of question?

I think a comma is missing.
Out of America's fascination with all things , antique

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

Out of America's fascination with all [u]things is subordinate clause


The sentence is alright, comma is not required. The meaning of this sentence is as follows:

A market has grown out of America's fascination with things THAT ARE antique.

It is stylistically acceptable to omit "that are".

Second, "Out of America's fascination with all things" is NOT a clause at all - there is no verb in this part. It is a prepositional phrase.

Moreover this sentence becomes even more tricky because of the subject-verb flip. The subject "a market" comes AFTER the verb "has grown".
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 11 Apr 2016
Posts: 53
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Technology
WE: Business Development (Computer Software)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Aug 2016, 05:57
My approach to solve this question :

1. Look at the split for bringing , the present continuous tense is required hence eliminate C & E
2. Now in A,B and D antique is singular, hence the split has is required over have : eliminate A and D
3. Left with B, read it again with full sentence sounds correct

Total time taken to solve : 56 seconds
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: GMAT Coach
Joined: 05 Nov 2012
Posts: 130
Location: Peru
GPA: 3.98
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Oct 2016, 05:03
daagh wrote:
To understand this question in its logical perspective, one needs to appreciate that the shows themselves create the interest by virtue of their sensational nature and therefore people throng to see them. Therefore, it is clear that the shows entice people. Then a demand emerges and the commercial people step in to cash in on the ready-made boom to make easy money. Therefore, the booming market is the end of the chain and not the beginning.
If this tenet is clear, then this can be easily solved. Here the verb has to be plural either -are bringing or a simple present tense bring. It is now the importance of the increasing frequency can be realized. It a frequently changing one means that it is a dynamic factor and an on- going affair. What better way could be there than to describe in a progressive tense—namely, are bringing. Please also note that choice B meticulously abides by the touch rule of relative pronoun. Therefore, B is the best IMO.
Kaplan’ choice of D as the official answer is understandable, considering Kaplan’s fancy for gaining popularity more through controversies than through logic


I agree with you, this is a variation of an official guide question:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

In this sentence, the relative pronoun “that” could refer to the previous noun –fixtures- or nouns –furniture and fixtures- , yet it could also refer to the nucleus of the noun – styles or market.

In this case, by context, the pronoun “that” can only refer to market, so the subject of the clause is singular.

However, in this variation, “which” could refer to both market and shows, making the sentence ambiguous. If I had to pick one, I would pick “shows” –choice B- because it is next to “which”.

I have seen many variations of original questions, and the people who make these variations do not always take into account possible changes in syntax.
_________________

Clipper Ledgard
GMAT Coach

Chat Moderator
avatar
P
Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 596
Location: India
Concentration: Leadership, Strategy
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Telecommunications)
Premium Member
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Oct 2016, 15:01
sayantanc2k wrote:
plogod wrote:
See pic below for explanation.



The "intervening phrases and modifiers" would be frequently of the following types; identifying them may be useful to "keep track of the subject". The examples below are kept simple so as to aid in identifying / reducing more complex cases to such simple ones:

1. Prepositional phrase: The house beside the river was owned by John.
2. Subordinate clause modifier: The house that stands beside the river was owned by John.
3. Past participle phrase modifier: The house built beside the river was owned by John.
4. Present participle phrase modifier: The house standing beside the river was owned by John.
5. Absolute phrase modifier: The house - its colour not faded in years - is owned by John.




Hi sayantanc2k,

What should be the correct answer? I chose E
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 23 Dec 2014
Posts: 22
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 May 2017, 10:02
A and D are cz of the "have". Should be singular has

C and E are out cz bring is plural
Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a   [#permalink] 04 May 2017, 10:02

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4    Next  [ 66 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.