GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Nov 2018, 04:26

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • All GMAT Club Tests are Free and open on November 22nd in celebration of Thanksgiving Day!

     November 22, 2018

     November 22, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Mark your calendars - All GMAT Club Tests are free and open November 22nd to celebrate Thanksgiving Day! Access will be available from 0:01 AM to 11:59 PM, Pacific Time (USA)
  • Free lesson on number properties

     November 23, 2018

     November 23, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4488
Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2016, 09:35
1
2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

69% (00:52) correct 31% (00:57) wrong based on 189 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive metal.

(A) Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive metal
(B) Potassium is a highly reactive metal, it has an outer electron that is easily lost
(C) A highly reactive metal, potassium, with an outer electron that is easily lost
(D) The outer election of potassium, a highly reactive metal, is easily lost
(E) A highly reactive metal that easily loses its outer electron is named “potassium”


The GMAT Sentence Correction is not a test of only grammar: logic is at least as important as grammar. An answer choice that is grammatically correct but logically flawed is always wrong. For a discussion of these ideas, as well as the OE for this particular question, see:
Logical Splits on GMAT Sentence Correction

Mike :-)

_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Director
Director
avatar
S
Joined: 08 Jun 2010
Posts: 906
Re: Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2016, 18:27
why e is wrong, pls, help thanks
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 7044
Re: Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2016, 18:53
1
1
thangvietnam wrote:
why e is wrong, pls, help thanks


E has an issue with the meaning...

(E) A highly reactive metal that easily loses its outer electron is named “potassium”..
It somehow now mens that any metal that easily loses its outer electron is named “potassium”..
But the original and logical meaning is that Potassium is one of these highly reactive metal
_________________

1) Absolute modulus : http://gmatclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-210849.html#p1622372
2)Combination of similar and dissimilar things : http://gmatclub.com/forum/topic215915.html
3) effects of arithmetic operations : https://gmatclub.com/forum/effects-of-arithmetic-operations-on-fractions-269413.html


GMAT online Tutor

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Mar 2017
Posts: 41
Location: Sweden
Concentration: Finance, Statistics
CAT Tests
Re: Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Aug 2018, 00:53
1
The answer is clearly A.
However, "whose" is used in this question for the possessive case of "which" used as an adjective
Example: a word whose meaning escapes me; an animal whose fur changes color.

Usually whose refer to people, in this case it referred to potassium.
_________________

* * *
Wish my good luck for 700 before Christmas!
If you think my post provided any help, please give +1 kudos, it helps a lot! <3

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 25 Apr 2018
Posts: 3
Location: India
Schools: Yale '21
GPA: 3.49
Re: Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2018, 19:34
Can anyone tell me why D is wrong?

Thanks.
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 50729
Re: Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2018, 19:42
akankshaboparai wrote:
Can anyone tell me why D is wrong?

Thanks.


MAGOOSH OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



A question about potassium, the 19th element on the Periodic Table. The five answers are all different, so we must treat each separately.

(A) Use of the possessive “whose” is perfectly fine either for a person or for an inanimate object. This option is grammatically and logically correct. This is a promising choice.

(B) This option is a run-on sentence with a comma splice. This is incorrect.

(C) This option commits the famous missing-verb mistake. We get a main subject, “a highly reactive metal,” and this subject never gets a full verb. This is incorrect.

(D) This is grammatically correct but awkward. It makes the electron, rather than potassium the element, the focus of the sentence, which casts the entire sentence into the passive. This is far from ideal.

(E) This choice is logically incorrect. It implies that any “highly reactive metal that easily loses its outer electron” would be called potassium, as if potassium were the name of a category of metals with similar properties, rather than a single metal. While you don’t need to understand chemistry (see below), you do need to keep the meaning consistent with the prompt. The prompt identifies potassium as a single metal, so we have to stick with that interpretation.

Choice (D) is a questionable answer, so (A) is by far the best answer here.



BTW, this is more than you need to know for the GMAT, but if you are interested in the chemistry, then on the Periodic Table of the Elements, all the IA elements below hydrogen are highly reactive metals that easily lose an outer electron. These include lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and caesium (a radioactive liquid that explodes on contact with air or water!) Potassium is the name of one metal in this category, not the name of the category. Sometimes the category is known as the Alkali Metals or the IA Elements.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 17 Jan 2017
Posts: 300
Location: India
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Premium Member CAT Tests
Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2018, 19:49
akankshaboparai wrote:
Can anyone tell me why D is wrong?

Thanks.


Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive metal.
- Meaning : Potassium is a highly reactive metal. Here, Outer electron is easily lost is a modifier.

(D) The outer election of potassium, a highly reactive metal, is easily lost
- Meaning : The outer electron of potassium is easily lost. Here, a highly reactive metal is a modifier.
Change in the meaning.

You can find similar differences is other options as well.

Hence D is wrong.
_________________

Only those who risk going too far, can possibly find out how far one can go

GMAT Club Bot
Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m &nbs [#permalink] 29 Aug 2018, 19:49
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Potassium, whose outer electron is easily lost, is a highly reactive m

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.