GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 14 Oct 2019, 23:24

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 4076
GPA: 3.39
Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 09 Oct 2019, 03:05
1
1
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 168 sessions

85% (03:02) correct 15% (02:07) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 178 sessions

76% (00:56) correct 24% (01:18) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 175 sessions

79% (01:28) correct 21% (01:44) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Passage # 72, Date : 08-MAR-2019
This post is a part of New Project RC Butler 2019. Click here for Details


Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Evidently not so. Since the 1960s, when people started talking about clean air in the first place, the American energy industry, which includes coal companies, oil companies, and utility companies, has dragged its heels on every initiative to improve the quality of the air we breathe. Even after the Clean Air Act of 1970 and its amendments in 1977 and 1990 made it clear that controlling air pollution is a national priority, these companies have found tricks and loopholes to avoid compliance.

Perhaps the most egregious loophole is the one that allows older power plants to disregard limits on sulfur dioxide emissions until they undergo a major renovation, at which point they have to comply. Sulfur dioxide from coal-burning power plants is the primary cause of acid rain in North America. The Clean Air Act states that when coal burning power plants upgrade their equipment, they must then comply with sulfur dioxide limitations by either installing scrubbing equipment that cleans the emissions or using fuel with lower sulfur content. The law tied the timing of compliance to major renovations in order to give power plants a grace period in which to comply. Many power plants, however, have exploited a loophole in this law by instituting a series of “minor” renovations that, in effect, upgrade their equipment without requiring them to comply with the Clean Air Act. Some plants have cheated the system by undergoing “minor” renovations for decades.

The power companies claim that they have to resort to these underhanded measures because the cost of compliance with the Clean Air Act is too high. And if everyone else is cheating the system, why should they have to install costly sulfur dioxide scrubbers? This cost argument falls apart upon scrutiny. Since 1977, more than 400 power plants across the country have managed to comply with the restrictions and are still making money. The sulfur dioxide scrubbing equipment has turned out to be far less expensive than the power industry naysayers claimed it would be. Many power plants have even complied with the emissions limits and reduced their operating costs by switching from high-sulfur Appalachian coal to the low-sulfur coal produced in western states such as Wyoming and Idaho. Western coal is not only cleaner than eastern coal, but also, because it is generally closer to the surface, as much as 30 percent less expensive to extract.

Clearly, the costs of compliance with the Clean Air Act can be justified, but if these companies were honest, such justifications would not have to be made. If they were honest, they would acknowledge the costs of not complying: the health costs of increased rates of asthma and lung cancer in high-emissions areas; the environmental costs of acid-scarred forests and lakes; the aesthetic costs of a haze of sulfur dioxide cutting visibility across the eastern United States to only half of what it was in preindustrial times. When you look at the true costs you have to ask, is any cost too high for clean air?


1. According to the information given in the passage, sulfur dioxide emissions are linked to all except which of the following phenomena?

A. Reduced visibility in the eastern United States
B. Damage to the ozone hole
C. Increased rates of asthma
D. Acid rain
E. Damaged forests


2. In the fourth paragraph, the passage mentions the “400 power plants” for what purpose?

A. To provide concrete evidence that many power plants have complied with the Clean Air Act provisions without undergoing ruinous financial hardship
B. To demonstrate the size and influence of the energy industry in the United States
C. To demonstrate that only a fraction of the power plants in the country have complied with the Clean Air Act, while hundreds of others have avoided compliance through tricks and loopholes
D. To demonstrate that companies can both comply with the Clean Air Act and achieve reductions in their operating costs by employing new, more efficient technologies
E. To suggest that those companies that have not complied are in the minority


3. Which of the following statements, if true, would provide the strongest argument for a utility company spokesman wishing to refute the arguments expressed in the passage?

A. Over the last decade, the energy industry has funded an environmental initiative that has planted more than 200,000 new trees.
B. The dangers of acid rain to human health have been wildly exaggerated by environmental extremists who seek to scare the general public.
C. The specifications of the Clean Air Act, although well intentioned, in practice require power plants to adopt less efficient technologies that increase emissions of atmospheric pollutants other than sulfur dioxide that have been linked to equally serious problems.
D. A substantial upgrade to a coal-burning power plant that includes the installation of sulfur dioxide scrubbing equipment can cost hundreds of millions of dollars, although companies can often recoup most of these costs over the following years as a result of efficiency benefits from the upgrade.
E. The scientific data upon which the Clean Air Act was based have not been corroborated by the scientists at the Center for Atmospheric Truth, a research group funded by a consortium of energy companies.



Source: McGraw-Hill's GMAT 2013 (544-721)
Difficulty Level: 600

_________________

Originally posted by SajjadAhmad on 03 Jun 2018, 05:26.
Last edited by SajjadAhmad on 09 Oct 2019, 03:05, edited 3 times in total.
Updated - Complete topic (872).
Most Helpful Community Reply
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 4076
GPA: 3.39
Re: Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Mar 2019, 07:38
2
mallya12 Kaustubh30

Official Explanation


1. According to the information given in the passage, sulfur dioxide emissions are linked to all except which of the following phenomena?

Explanation

The passage mentions all of the other answer choices as consequences of sulfur dioxide emissions, but it does not mention the ozone hole.

Answer B


2. In the fourth paragraph, the passage mentions the “400 power plants” (Highlighted) for what purpose?

Explanation

The passage states: “Since 1977, more than 400 power plants across the country have managed to comply with the restrictions and are still making money.” This statement comes immediately after a presentation of the industry argument that compliance with the Clean Air Act causes undue financial hardship; this statement is intended as a direct refutation of that claim.

Answer: A


3. Which of the following statements, if true, would provide the strongest argument for a utility company spokesman wishing to refute the arguments expressed in the passage?

Explanation

C suggests that the specifications that the passage argues companies should follow in order to clean the air might actually have the opposite effect, and could make the air less clean. If true, this would undermine the entire argument of the passage. A and B are defenses for energy companies but do not fundamentally undermine the argument in the passage. The information presented in D probably weakens the energy industry’s argument more than it helps it. And statement E does not say that the scientific data are false, only that a group with financial ties to the energy industry (and, hence, probably biased) has not corroborated those data.

Answer: C


Hope it Helps
_________________
General Discussion
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 03 Dec 2018
Posts: 169
Re: Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Mar 2019, 01:53
Please explain Q2
How to infer that 400 indicates many industries and not a small fraction?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 21 Feb 2019
Posts: 2
Re: Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2019, 04:38
Please explain the logic behind answer to question 3. why the answer is C? WHY Can't it be A
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Jan 2019
Posts: 4
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Human Resources
WE: Programming (Computer Software)
Re: Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jun 2019, 07:55
mallya12 wrote:
Please explain Q2
How to infer that 400 indicates many industries and not a small fraction?




400 power plant in usa means there are near about 50 states in usa and more over 4 power plant per state is sufficient irrespective of the size of state so can be inferred that 400 is not a small fraction.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Oct 2018
Posts: 1
Re: Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jun 2019, 21:34
i spent 7:49 minutes and that includes a 4:59 min reading time. i have all my answers correct. Is my progress good?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 18 Dec 2017
Posts: 480
Location: United States (KS)
Re: Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Sep 2019, 17:45
Parasbajaj92 wrote:
i spent 7:49 minutes and that includes a 4:59 min reading time. i have all my answers correct. Is my progress good?


Parasbajaj92
I guess it is fine. Since the language is easy and passage is "detail" heavy, you can be smart and skip some details but remember where to look for them.
And you can also always read the first question before starting the passage. Sometimes the first question is a detail one and can be answered without reading the whole passage (mostly likely that wont be the case).

I spent 3:30 to ready and answer first question. 45 seconds to answer 2nd question and 1minute for the last one.

I guess the language of the passage should tell you how fast or slow you should go.

Thank you!
_________________
Please be generous in giving Kudos!!
“Practice is the hardest part of learning, and training is the essence of transformation.” ― Ann Voskamp
Software Tester currently in USA ( ;-) )
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev   [#permalink] 13 Sep 2019, 17:45
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Pretty much everybody agrees that clean air is a good thing, right? Ev

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne