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Subject-Verb Agreement

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Manager
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Subject-Verb Agreement [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2017, 06:03
I faced this sentence in the Manhattan SC strategy guide: "No matter how much work it may require, getting an MBA is an investment that pays off for most people". Up to the guide the sentence is grammatically correct, but my question is why don't we need to add S to the verb (require) as the subject is singular (using the pronoun it)?

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Re: Subject-Verb Agreement [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2017, 12:01
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may is considered a modal auxiliary and any verb that comes after a model auxiliary should be in its root form. so '...may require...' would be correct.

Other examples include: will, must etc.
For example: the right sentence is "She will go" rather than "She will goes" OR "he must stand on the table" instead of "he must stands on the table"

Honestly....the easiest way to note the difference is just using your ear. "May requires" just sounds awkward.

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Subject-Verb Agreement [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2017, 12:29
jwang516 - is there any source that piled the most prevalent auxiliaries?

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Intern
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Joined: 31 Mar 2017
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Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 16

GMAT 1: 710 Q45 V42
GMAT 2: 730 Q50 V39
GPA: 3.73
CAT Tests
Re: Subject-Verb Agreement [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2017, 15:44
Here is a good explanation. I don't remember, but if you are using Manhattan Prep, I think Manhattan Prep may refer them as "helping verbs"

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/auxiliary.htm

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Re: Subject-Verb Agreement   [#permalink] 06 Aug 2017, 15:44
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