GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 15 Jun 2019, 22:45

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 2888
Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2019, 12:26
2
7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

71% (01:39) correct 29% (01:44) wrong based on 413 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Project SC Butler: Day 63 Sentence Correction (SC1)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land extending up to the mean high tide line is in fact publicly owned and is open to everyone according to the public trust doctrine.

A) Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land

B) Landowners, prohibiting the public to swim and sunbathe on stretches of private beach, even though the land

C) Landowners often prohibit the public from swimming and sunbathing on stretches of private beach; however, the land

D) Swimming and sunbathing by the pubic, prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners, are, however, part of the land

E) Landowners often prohibit swimmers and sunbathers from stretches of private beach; however, the land



The best or excellent answers get kudos, which will be awarded after the answer is revealed.

_________________
SC Butler has resumed!
Get two SC questions to practice, whose links you can find by date, here.


Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life? -- Mary Oliver
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Aug 2018
Posts: 227
CAT Tests
Re: Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2019, 13:44
2
IMO C

) Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land---wrong,subject s plural and verb is singular

B) Landowners, prohibiting the public to swim and sunbathe on stretches of private beach, even though the land---wrong, no verb in sentence

C) Landowners often prohibit the public from swimming and sunbathing on stretches of private beach; however, the land---correct

D) Swimming and sunbathing by the pubic, prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners, are, however, part of the land---wrong, modifier and meaning error

E) Landowners often prohibit swimmers and sunbathers from stretches of private beach; however, the land---MEAnING CHANGE,no mention of public

Posted from my mobile device
_________________
"Press +1 KUDOS"

Be very critical of my Post
Ask as many questions of my post possible
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
D
Status: Manager
Joined: 27 Oct 2018
Posts: 347
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, International Business
GPA: 3.67
WE: Pharmaceuticals (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 09 Jan 2019, 02:58
1
sharing my opinion:

A) Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land
I think it is the correct one
note: for 'Swimming and sunbathing': when using 'and' with two gerunds which represent one combined activity(also like 'Singing and walking), then they are dealt with as singular. but if the 2 gerunds represent separate activities (like 'babysitting and running'), then they are plural.

B) Landowners, prohibiting the public to swim and sunbathe on stretches of private beach, even though the land
1- 'prohibiting' is a beginning of a participial clause which acts as an adjective for the noun 'landowner', leaving the noun 'landowners with no verb.
2- 'even though' means 'in spite of' which has a different meaning from 'however' which means 'but'.
3- the idiomatic preposition for 'prohibit' is 'from', not 'to'.

C) Landowners often prohibit the public from swimming and sunbathing on stretches of private beach; however, the land
1-'often' introduce a new meaning to the sentence (it infers occasion or frequency) which is not in the main paragraph

D) Swimming and sunbathing by the pubic, prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners, are, however, part of the land
1- 'prohibited ...' is a participial clause which acts as an adjective for the noun 'Swimming and sunbathing'. This makes 'are' the verb for the subject 'Swimming and sunbathing' which wrongly interprets that 'Swimming and sunbathing' are part of the land.

E) Landowners often prohibit swimmers and sunbathers from stretches of private beach; however, the land
1-'often' introduce a new meaning to the sentence (it infers occasion or frequency) which is not in the main paragraph
2- omitting 'the public' from the sentence alters the meaning.

so A
_________________
..Thanks for KUDOS

Originally posted by Mahmoudfawzy83 on 08 Jan 2019, 14:07.
Last edited by Mahmoudfawzy83 on 09 Jan 2019, 02:58, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 15 Nov 2018
Posts: 21
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.76
Re: Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2019, 18:18
1
A) Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land (Plural subject but singular verb)

B) Landowners, prohibiting the public to swim and sunbathe on stretches of private beach, even though the land (the sentence lacks a verb, here it should have been prohibit instead of prohibiting and no commas)

C) Landowners often prohibit the public from swimming and sunbathing on stretches of private beach; however, the land (Correct)

D) Swimming and sunbathing by the pubic, prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners, are, however, part of the land (Swimming and sunbathing .... are part of the land. This statements distorts the intended meaning)

E) Landowners often prohibit swimmers and sunbathers from stretches of private beach; however, the land (Distorts the meaning. Landowners do not prohibit swimmers and sunbathers, rather they prohibit public from swimming and sunbathing)
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 29 Nov 2018
Posts: 78
Location: India
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2019, 18:52
Apart from Subject verb agreement error in option A, Its a passive voice construction, which is not preferred in GMAT.
Moreover Probhit X from Y is the correct idiom. Thus option C is correct . Even the doer of the sentence Landowners is clearly mentioned. I agree 'often' in option C is not required and the sentence would have made a much better choice without it .
_________________
Hope it helps,

Thanks,
Mofe Bhatia
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Status: eternal student
Joined: 06 Mar 2018
Posts: 173
Location: Kazakhstan
GPA: 3.87
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 09 Jan 2019, 03:20
1
Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land extending up to the mean high tide line is in fact publicly owned and is open to everyone according to the public trust doctrine.

Meaning analysis: Private beach’s landowners prohibit people from swimming and sunbathing on their beaches. But some extending part of the beach is owned by public, and everyone is free to swim and sunbath.

Error analysis: let’s see sentence structure
Swimming and sunbathing by the public (main subject - plural)
……….is prohibited on stretches of private beach (main verb – singular, doesn’t agree in number with Subject)
…………………………by landowners; (passive construction tells us that they do main action “prohibit”)
however, (so second IC, semicolon is indicator of that, and we expect meaning direction change)
…….the land extending up to the mean high tide line (main subject – land – singular, with modifier - extending)
………..is in fact publicly owned and is open to everyone according to the public trust doctrine. (two main verbs – also singular)

So we have SV agreement error. Sentence is in passive voice, better and clear to use active construction with correct idiom prohibit X from Y. But without knowing this idiom we can still eliminate other answer choices on solid grounds. :blushing
POE

A) Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land

B) Landowners, prohibiting the public to swim and sunbathe on stretches of private beach, even though the land
(there is no verb for Landowners, "prohibiting" - modifier, prohibit X to Y - incorrect)

C) Landowners often prohibit the public from swimming and sunbathing on stretches of private beach; however, the land
(here doer perform main action of prohibition, we have beautiful ; semocolon connecting two IC, usage of "often" - is questinalbe, there is a slight change in meaning)

D) Swimming and sunbathing by the pubic, prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners, are, however, part of the land
("are" agrees in number with our plural subject, but "Swimming and sunbathing" are not the part of the land, it distorts the intended meaning)

E) Landowners often prohibit swimmers and sunbathers from stretches of private beach; however, the land
(this sentence is grammatically fine, but distorts intended meaning, action of swimming and sunbathing is prohibited not swimmers and sunbathers themselves)

So A and B are eliminated - SV agreement, D and E are eliminated - meaning change.

Among 5 answer choices C is the winner.
_________________
My SC approach flowchart

(no one is ideal, please correct if you see any mistakes or gaps in my explanation, it will be helpful for both of us, thank you)

___________________
Practice makes perfect!


It is pointless to try to study if it is not fun, then it becomes a chore. At that point, you will either hate your studies or became afraid of them.

Originally posted by GKomoku on 09 Jan 2019, 00:36.
Last edited by GKomoku on 09 Jan 2019, 03:20, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Dec 2018
Posts: 41
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, International Business
GPA: 3.48
WE: General Management (Manufacturing)
Re: Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2019, 02:29
The correct idiom is ' Prohibit X from -ing ' .
2 independent clauses are connected with semicolon and subordinating conjunction.
So C is the correct answer

Kudos please
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 2888
Re: Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2019, 18:01

Project SC Butler: Day 63 Sentence Correction (SC1)



Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land extending up to the mean high tide line is in fact publicly owned and is open to everyone according to the public trust doctrine.

A) Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land
B) Landowners, prohibiting the public to swim and sunbathe on stretches of private beach, even though the land
C) Landowners often prohibit the public from swimming and sunbathing on stretches of private beach; however, the land
D) Swimming and sunbathing by the pubic, prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners, are, however, part of the land
E) Landowners often prohibit swimmers and sunbathers from stretches of private beach; however, the land

OFFICIAL EXPLANATION

• The idiomatic error in this sentence is prohibited on
instead of the correct prohibited from

[On that basis,] eliminate options A and D.

• Option B incorrectly uses prohibiting . . . to instead of prohibiting . . . from,
so eliminate B

• Choice C correctly arranges the sentence idiomatically, that is,
Landlords prohibit X from doing Y.
Option C puts the right subject in place.
The correct subject of prohibit from is landowners. Landowners are the people who do the prohibiting

Option C also correctly uses the verbal concepts swimming and sunbathing as the direct object of prohibit from

• Choice E does correctly use prohibit . . . from, but uses the wrong direct object.
The direct object of prohibit from in E is swimmers and sunbathers instead of the verbal concepts swimming and sunbathing,
Eliminate E.

• The correct answer is C.

COMMENTS

zubair123 , MofeBhatia , and shahidomer77 - I'm glad you decided to join us. :)

The OE is pretty good.

The correct idiom is [actors] Prohibit X from doing Y.

• Option A: subject/verb agreement? Leave the issue alone.

At times, two ____ING words can form a singular subject.
Correct: Drinking and driving has been stigmatized by MADD.
These OE authors refer to swimming and sunbathing as A direct object, singular.

We could easily make the case that the subject in this question is compound.

Avoid the issue.
Eliminate A, B, and D because all three use the wrong idiom.
There are actors (landlords) who
prohibit
the public (X) from
swimming and sunbathing (Y)

The correct idiom, prohibit X from doing Y, is among the most common of the idioms tested by the GMAT.
A, B, and D do not employ that idiom—and option C does.

Use the multiple choice comparison to your advantage if you are not sure about prohibit . . . . on
Option C is true to the idiom and correct in all ways.

• Option C, "often" - Option C does not change the intended meaning.
Options C and E use "often."

Options A, B, and D do not.

Why are people arguing that C changes the [intended] meaning?

Option C does not change the intended meaning.
It is the only grammatically correct answer, so the sentence in C is the intended meaning.

(Often does not make enough of a difference to exclude A, B, and D.)

Original meaning is not determined by option A. This issue is subtle, but . . .
Do not rely on a hard rule that option A tells us what the sentence is supposed to say.
Better: if the correct option means something different from A, there is no problem.
Mark that answer. Option A does not dictate what the meaning must be.


GKomoku wrote the best answer. Kudos!
_________________
SC Butler has resumed!
Get two SC questions to practice, whose links you can find by date, here.


Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life? -- Mary Oliver
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Status: eternal student
Joined: 06 Mar 2018
Posts: 173
Location: Kazakhstan
GPA: 3.87
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jan 2019, 01:30
Hello generis

Thank you for detailed explanation, carefully read everything :thumbup:

generis wrote:
• Option C, "often" - Option C does not change the intended meaning.
Options C and E use "often."

Options A, B, and D do not.

Why are people arguing that C changes the [intended] meaning?

Option C does not change the intended meaning.
It is the only grammatically correct answer, so the sentence in C is the intended meaning.

(Often does not make enough of a difference to exclude A, B, and D.)

I’ve revised again about Simple tenses, and found characteristic words and phrases used with simple tenses.
This words usually indicates usage of Simple tenses: always, ever, as a rule, never, every day (week, morning, year, etc), now and then, from time to time, generally, selfdom, usually, regularly, rarely, often, daily, sometimes.
So (C) doesn’t change the intended meaning of the sentence, it just gives some additional information.

generis wrote:

At times, two ____ING words can form a singular subject.
Correct: Drinking and driving has been stigmatized by MADD.
These OE authors refer to swimming and sunbathing as A direct object, singular.

We could easily make the case that the subject in this question is compound.

Mahmoudfawzy83 wrote:
A) Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of private beach by landowners; however, the land
I think it is the correct one
note: for 'Swimming and sunbathing': when using 'and' with two gerunds which represent one combined activity(also like 'Singing and walking), then they are dealt with as singular. but if the 2 gerunds represent separate activities (like 'babysitting and running'), then they are plural.


About two gerunds that take singular subject I've come across with this for the first time, so googled extra information.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Two gerund clauses coordinated with and are plural in agreement.

Reading and listening to the television are two ways to improve your vocabulary.
Emailing and texting are illegal activities for drivers behind the wheel.
Walking and jogging have always been my favourite forms of exercises.


A gerund clause is usually singular in agreement with the verb. Two clauses coordinated with or or nor are also singular in agreement.

Texting while driving is dangerous.
Texing or holding a phone is allowed when parked.
Neither texting nor holding a phone is allowed while driving.


Special case: gerunds that go together to form a unit of activity: drinking and driving, or texting and driving, etc. In those cases, when the point is the combined act, then a singular is nearly always used.

Texting and driving is dangerous.

Gerunds and other nouns also can take singular verb:

Bacon and eggs is my favorite breakfast.

But, at the moment, bacon and eggs are rather expensive'
---------------------------------------------------

generis, could you please enlighten and give some extra information about gerunds (or simple nouns) taking singular subject, I mean when we can consider them as one combined activity? When we perform this actions simultaneously? :roll:
_________________
My SC approach flowchart

(no one is ideal, please correct if you see any mistakes or gaps in my explanation, it will be helpful for both of us, thank you)

___________________
Practice makes perfect!


It is pointless to try to study if it is not fun, then it becomes a chore. At that point, you will either hate your studies or became afraid of them.
GMAT Club Bot
Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of   [#permalink] 10 Jan 2019, 01:30
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Swimming and sunbathing by the public is prohibited on stretches of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne