It is currently 11 Dec 2017, 21:57

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

“Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minute

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

VP
VP
User avatar
V
Status: Preparing for the GMAT
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 1299

Kudos [?]: 1128 [0], given: 547

Location: Pakistan
GPA: 3.4
Premium Member
“Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minute [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jun 2017, 03:37
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

69% (01:23) correct 31% (01:39) wrong based on 158 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

“Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minutes of commercials. The show’s producers offer high schools $50,000 worth of television equipment to air the program. Many parents and teachers oppose the use of commercial television in schools, arguing that advertisements are tantamount to indoctrination. But students are already familiar with television commercials and know how to distinguish programming from advertising.

The argument assumes that

(A) the effects of an advertisement viewed in a classroom would be similar to those of the same advertisement viewed at home
(B) many educators would be willing to allow the indoctrination of students in exchange for new equipment for their schools
(C) television advertising is a more effective way of promoting a product to high school students than print advertising
(D) high school students are sufficiently interested in world affairs to learn from a television news program
(E) a television news program produced especially for high school students is an effective teaching tool

Master GMAT
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

Official PS Practice Questions
Press +1 Kudos if this post is helpful

Kudos [?]: 1128 [0], given: 547

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 31 Jul 2017
Posts: 169

Kudos [?]: 67 [0], given: 74

Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GPA: 3.32
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
“Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minute [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2017, 05:44
I don't like this question. Although the OA is (A), I believe (D) makes an equally strong case. If you negate the answer, and students aren't interested in the program, then they do not view the advertisement and the argument is pointless.

Anyone else care to way in?
_________________

D-Day: November 18th, 2017

Kudos [?]: 67 [0], given: 74

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 15 Jul 2017
Posts: 7

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 127

“Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minute [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2017, 12:15
nightblade354 wrote:
I don't like this question. Although the OA is (A), I believe (D) makes an equally strong case. If you negate the answer, and students aren't interested in the program, then they do not view the advertisement and the argument is pointless.

Anyone else care to way in?



[D] is talking about the students' interests in 'world affairs', which is not the argument.

The argument is about students knowing the difference between programming and advertising. The news show info just sets up the premise.

Plus, assuming the news show to be about 'world affairs' is a bit of a stretch. I mean, it could be National, Local or about Science.
The bit about being interested in 'world affairs' is the trap here. Assumptions are usually generic or somehow tied to something in the paragraph.

[D] doesn't tie to anything in the paragraph. I can only say that you assumed the news show is about 'world affairs' and picked [D].

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 127

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 9

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 9

GMAT 1: 570 Q49 V19
Re: “Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minute [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2017, 20:54
This is a good question, let me share my reasoning.
This is an assumption question, so we basically need to strengthen the conclusion. Arriving at the conclusion can get a bit tricky here as it is something which is not directly stated by is something which is indirectly implied. The author wants to say that the advertisements aired in school between news program do not indoctrinate students in other words he is refuting the apprehensions of teachers and parents, what is stated in the last sentence works as an evidence to author's conclusion. Now, if this part is understood then is question is a cakewalk, as if we need to strengthen the author's conclusion that advertisements aired in schools do not indoctrinate students then we basically need to get hold of an option which states the effect of those advertisements is the same at both school and elsewhere and this is what option A does.

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 9

Re: “Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minute   [#permalink] 08 Aug 2017, 20:54
Display posts from previous: Sort by

“Channel One” is a 12-minute school news show that includes two minute

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.