GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 Apr 2019, 10:12

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Posts: 173
The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2010, 08:07
2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

55% (01:13) correct 45% (01:19) wrong based on 118 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may make a lawmaker change his opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

A. a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
B. only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
C. only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
D. a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
E. a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2010
Posts: 112
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2010, 15:07
The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may sway a lawmaker’s opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.
 a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
 only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
 only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
 a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together

Parallelism
D
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
Affiliations: ManhattanGMAT
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 333
Location: San Francisco
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Aug 2010, 12:43
2
Hey All,

Lots of ideas on this one, but no one's taken it apart yet. That's what I'm here for!

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may sway a lawmaker’s opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

This is clearly a verb tense and subject-verb agreement question. We notice the former in the split between "causes" and "has been caused". We notice the latter int he split between "causes" and "cause" (or "has" and "have"). For subject-verb agreement, we check the subject and make sure it matches. "Half-dozen (constituents)" is plural, so we need "cause" or "have". As for verb tense, you always check it against some context verb in the sentence. In this case, we have "is", a present tense verb. Then we ask ourselves, is there any good reason to change tense? In this case, there is not.

 a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
Problem: "Causes" doesn't match the subject "half dozen (constituents)"

 only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
PROBLEM: This is actually a concision issue. No reason to switch to the passive voice here. While this is a rule, it's VERY rare on the real test, and comes up way more when people are trying to build questions. DO NOT cross something off just because it's passive. We're only doing it here because there's a perfectly great answer WITHOUT the passive voice elsewhere.

 only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
PROBLEM: No reason to switch to the present perfect tense ("has been caused").

 a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
ANSWER: Correct tense, correct subject-verb agreement.

 a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together
PROBLEM: No reason to switch to the present perfect tense ("have caused").

Hope that helps!

-t
_________________

Tommy Wallach | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | San Francisco


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Reviews
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Nov 2011
Posts: 161
Location: India
Concentration: Technology, General Management
GPA: 3.95
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Feb 2012, 23:02
Some how A seems to be correct.

I guess the counting is applied to 'dozen' (which is half in this case and hence singular).
_________________
-------------------------
-Aravind Chembeti
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Nov 2011
Posts: 161
Location: India
Concentration: Technology, General Management
GPA: 3.95
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Feb 2012, 22:28
Chembeti wrote:
Some how A seems to be correct.

I guess the counting is applied to 'dozen' (which is half in this case and hence singular).


I have posted an artilce regarding collective nouns and their corresponding verb form. Please check
collective-nouns-singular-or-plural-128340.html

Now, I am clear why the OA is A. Here the key word is 'banded together' which means the author is talking about some group but not individual items and hence the verb should be 'causes' but not 'cause'.
_________________
-------------------------
-Aravind Chembeti
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 25 Aug 2011
Posts: 137
Location: India
GMAT 1: 730 Q49 V40
WE: Operations (Insurance)
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2012, 00:01
Tommy,

A half dozen flowers was sent to the girl
half dozen flowers were sent to the girl

Doesent the a in statement 1 necessiate a singular?


TommyWallach wrote:
Hey All,

Lots of ideas on this one, but no one's taken it apart yet. That's what I'm here for!

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may sway a lawmaker’s opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

This is clearly a verb tense and subject-verb agreement question. We notice the former in the split between "causes" and "has been caused". We notice the latter int he split between "causes" and "cause" (or "has" and "have"). For subject-verb agreement, we check the subject and make sure it matches. "Half-dozen (constituents)" is plural, so we need "cause" or "have". As for verb tense, you always check it against some context verb in the sentence. In this case, we have "is", a present tense verb. Then we ask ourselves, is there any good reason to change tense? In this case, there is not.

 a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
Problem: "Causes" doesn't match the subject "half dozen (constituents)"

 only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
PROBLEM: This is actually a concision issue. No reason to switch to the passive voice here. While this is a rule, it's VERY rare on the real test, and comes up way more when people are trying to build questions. DO NOT cross something off just because it's passive. We're only doing it here because there's a perfectly great answer WITHOUT the passive voice elsewhere.

 only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
PROBLEM: No reason to switch to the present perfect tense ("has been caused").

 a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
ANSWER: Correct tense, correct subject-verb agreement.

 a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together
PROBLEM: No reason to switch to the present perfect tense ("have caused").

Hope that helps!

-t
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Oh GMAT ! I give you one more shot :)
Joined: 14 Feb 2013
Posts: 75
Location: United States (MI)
Concentration: General Management, Technology
GMAT 1: 580 Q44 V28
GMAT 2: 690 Q49 V34
GPA: 3.5
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jul 2014, 12:23
bibha wrote:
The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may sway a lawmaker’s opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.
 a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
 only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
 only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
 a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
 a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together


The rule for collective nouns is this: Use a singular verb when the group is considered as a unit acting together. Use a plural verb when the individual members of the group are acting separately.

now banded together literally means combined, so the option A becomes

(A) a half-dozen (constituents) combined only causes him alarm
here the half-dozen constituents are acting collectively, hence a singular verb causes is appropriate.

Other examples are

(a) The committee insists on having its proposal presented to the mayor.
(b) The committee are still arguing over whom to send as their representative to the mayor.
P.S. : You need more than 1 person to have an argument.
_________________
Life is a highway
I wanna ride it all night long
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 54371
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2019, 01:17
bibha wrote:
The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may make a lawmaker change his opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

A. a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
B. only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
C. only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
D. a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
E. a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together


Official Solution:

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may make a lawmaker change his opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

A. a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
B. only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
C. only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
D. a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
E. a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together

The noun half-dozen, though it refers to a collection of six discrete things or people, is grammatically singular. Any verbs that take it as their antecedent, then, must also be singular. This sentence also tests correct verb form, which should be simple present tense because the sentence refers to facts that are generally true. The sentence is correct as written.
  1. The noun half-dozen agrees with the verb causes, and the correct simple present tense is used to describe facts generally believed to be true.
  2. Verb tense is correct in this option, but the phrasing of the sentence is wordy and awkward.
  3. The verb form has been caused unnecessarily uses past perfect, and the word order is awkward.
  4. Cause does not agree with the singular a half-dozen.
  5. This option is awkward and wordy.

Answer: A
_________________
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp   [#permalink] 12 Apr 2019, 01:17
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single imp

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.