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The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines

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The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 24 Apr 2014, 00:05
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The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines in habitat on both the Central American and Canadian ends of its range for decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue.

(A) decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue

(B) decades, has now become the focus of an urgent rescue push

(C) decades, and now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue

(D) decades now, is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue

(E) decades; now is the focus of an urgent rescue push

Originally posted by tusharGupta1 on 23 Apr 2014, 23:21.
Last edited by tusharGupta1 on 24 Apr 2014, 00:05, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2014, 13:24
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tusharGupta1 wrote:
The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines in habitat on both the Central American and Canadian ends of its range for decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue.

A ) decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue
B ) decades, has now become the focus of an urgent rescue push
C ) decades, and now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue
D ) decades now, is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue
E ) decades; now is the focus of an urgent rescue push

Dear tusharGupta1,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

At the beginning of the sentence, we have the main subject ("the insect"), a participial modifying clause, then the main verb ("faced"), then a direct object ("declines") then a long string of prepositional phrases modifying the direct object. Drop all the "fluff" and just put in the essential structure words:

(A) The insect faced decline, now is the focus ... RUN-ON, needs an "and" or other conjunction
(B) The insect faced decline, has now become the focus ... RUN-ON, needs an "and" or other conjunction
(C) The insect faced decline, and now is the focus ... proper parallelism between two verbs
(D) The insect faced decline now, is the focus ... Same mistake as (A), and the word "now" is in the wrong place
(E) The insect faced decline; now is the focus ... we would need a full clause after the semicolon, and what follows the semicolon here is a fragment, a verb-phrase with no subject

See this blog for more on Run-On sentences:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/run-on-sen ... questions/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2014, 19:36
hi mike
i have a query about
Quote:
:mike wrote:" The insect faced decline, now is the focus ... RUN-ON, needs an "and" or other conjunction"

the construction after comma seems more like an adverb modifier .i feel that it lacks the subject and is not an independent clause .(i feel that run on is wrong joining of independent clauses )
please look into this sentence :
Quote:
More than 300 rivers drain into Siberia's Lake Baikal, which holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined does (a correct GMAT sentence )

in this sentence the construction after comma seems same as is the construction in the question under contention
i mean if at all u contend that the construction : "....decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue.
contains "verb" after the comma then same can be said about this construction :"...world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined does"

PS : for the sake of clarity i have made "verbs" in respective construction bold
please help me understand if something is wrong in my understanding
thanks and regards
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2014, 21:57
hi mike
Quote:
mike wrote :The insect faced decline, has now become the focus ... RUN-ON, needs an "and" or other conjunction


i have a query regarding this also .i feel that run on is wrong joining of two independent clauses .for instance :
i need to relax ,i have so many things to do

i agree that a sentence :"The insect faced decline, has now become the focus....." is wrong but i feel that it is wrong because the construction "has now become the focus." lacks the subject .i feel that such faults are called fragment
please tell me if my understanding is wrong
thanks and regards
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2014, 11:36
2
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aditya8062 wrote:
hi mike
i have a query about
Quote:
:mike wrote:" The insect faced decline, now is the focus ... RUN-ON, needs an "and" or other conjunction"

the construction after comma seems more like an adverb modifier .i feel that it lacks the subject and is not an independent clause .(i feel that run on is wrong joining of independent clauses )

i have a query regarding this also .i feel that run on is wrong joining of two independent clauses .for instance :
i need to relax ,i have so many things to do

i agree that a sentence :"The insect faced decline, has now become the focus....." is wrong but i feel that it is wrong because the construction "has now become the focus." lacks the subject .i feel that such faults are called fragment
please tell me if my understanding is wrong
thanks and regards

please look into this sentence: "More than 300 rivers drain into Siberia's Lake Baikal, which holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined does (a correct GMAT sentence)"
in this sentence the construction after comma seems same as is the construction in the question under contention
i mean if at all u contend that the construction : "....decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue.
contains "verb" after the comma then same can be said about this construction :"...world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined does"

PS : for the sake of clarity i have made "verbs" in respective construction bold
please help me understand if something is wrong in my understanding
thanks and regards

Dear aditya8062
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, please do NOT use the quote boxes if you are simple quoting a sentence from another source, such as the OG. Simply use a different color or something of that sort. The quote boxes are to demonstrate what a previous GC user has said.

Also, just for reference --- this is a common mistake for non-native speakers --- spaces never come before periods & commas, as you have in your writing above. They always come after --- one space after a comma, and two after a period. Also, you need to capitalize the first word of each sentence. Mistakes of this sort on your business school application would be a huge red flag, perhaps unfairly indicating weakness in your verbal skills. You may know all this already, and perhaps you were just being casual on GMAT Club. This is your opportunity to practice writing absolutely flawless English: please do not underestimate how valuable this opportunity is. Everything you write here should be of the highest possible quality, so that you can get valuable feedback on your writing.

As to your question: yes, a sentence is certainly a run-on if two independent clauses are separated only by a comma. The problem with the sentence in the prompt is not that a a subject is missing. It would be perfectly correct parallel structure to omit the same subject for a second verb.
The insect faced decline, and now is the focus of ...
The candidate won his previous election in a landslide, but now is trailing in the polls.
Those sentences are 100% correct --- because of the parallel structure, we can drop the subject in the second branch. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/dropping-c ... -the-gmat/
The parallel structure absolute depends on the conjunction. If we omit the conjunction from either, these sentences become wrong:
The insect faced decline, now is the focus of ....
The candidate won his previous election in a landslide, now is trailing in the polls.
Now, to some extent, it is a matter of semantics whether to call these incorrect sentences "run-on sentences." I would call them "run-on sentences," precisely because they are incorrect for exactly the same reason that it is incorrect to juxtapose two independent clauses. In either case, simply adding a conjunction would fix the problem.

An adverbial clause, like any clause, would need to have a clear subject and clear verb. An adverbial phrase, such as a participial phrase, would not have a full verb. The structure "now is the focus of ..." cannot possibly be a proper phrase or clause, because it has a full verb "is" and no subject. It can only be the second branch of a parallel construction in which the subject is stated explicitly in the first branch.

The GMAT sentence about Lake Baikal is entirely different. Notice that you appended an extra verb, which makes the sentence wrong. That final "does" was not part of the OA of that question ---- if we put a verb there, it would have to be "do." The clause following the comma is 100% correct:
more than all the North American Great Lakes combined
Unlike the example from above, this has a legitimate subject and a verb implied by the parallel structure. Furthermore, this begins with an appropriate transition to the second branch of parallelism, the words "more than."

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2014, 19:45
Quote:
The GMAT sentence about Lake Baikal is entirely different. Notice that you appended an extra verb, which makes the sentence wrong. That final "does" was not part of the OA of that question ---- if we put a verb there, it would have to be "do." The clause following the comma is 100% correct:
more than all the North American Great Lakes combined


thanks a lot mike for your elaborate reply
i have a feeling that this sentence would be correct :More than 300 rivers drain into Siberia's Lake Baikal, which holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined do

what i want to understand is as why the above sentence is correct and why this below sentence (sentence 2) is wrong though in both the sentences there is a verb after the comma (a condition that should make both of them a run-on)
sentence 2 : The insect faced decline, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2014, 13:30
2
1
aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
The GMAT sentence about Lake Baikal is entirely different. Notice that you appended an extra verb, which makes the sentence wrong. That final "does" was not part of the OA of that question ---- if we put a verb there, it would have to be "do." The clause following the comma is 100% correct:
more than all the North American Great Lakes combined


thanks a lot mike for your elaborate reply
i have a feeling that this sentence would be correct :More than 300 rivers drain into Siberia's Lake Baikal, which holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined do

what i want to understand is as why the above sentence is correct and why this below sentence (sentence 2) is wrong though in both the sentences there is a verb after the comma (a condition that should make both of them a run-on)
sentence 2 : The insect faced decline, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue

Dear aditya8062

Once again:
More than 300 rivers drain into Siberia's Lake Baikal, which holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined do.
After the comma = Conjunction + Noun + Verb
conjunction = "than" is a subordinate conjunction
noun = "all the North American Great Lakes"
verb = "do"

The insect faced decline, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue.
After the comma = ____________ + _____________ + Verb
conjunction = MISSING
noun = implied by parallelism, "the insect"
verb = "is"

Unlike the first sentence, the second sentence is missing a CONJUNCTION that is absolutely necessary to complete the parallelism.
The sentences are not even that much alike --- the former has a comparison that involves the correct parallelism of two full clauses, and the latter, not a comparison, unsuccessfully attempts parallelism between two verbs of the same subject.

Does this make sense now?
Mike :-)
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2014, 23:35
mikemcgarry wrote:
aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
The GMAT sentence about Lake Baikal is entirely different. Notice that you appended an extra verb, which makes the sentence wrong. That final "does" was not part of the OA of that question ---- if we put a verb there, it would have to be "do." The clause following the comma is 100% correct:
more than all the North American Great Lakes combined


thanks a lot mike for your elaborate reply
i have a feeling that this sentence would be correct :More than 300 rivers drain into Siberia's Lake Baikal, which holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined do

what i want to understand is as why the above sentence is correct and why this below sentence (sentence 2) is wrong though in both the sentences there is a verb after the comma (a condition that should make both of them a run-on)
sentence 2 : The insect faced decline, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue

Dear aditya8062

Once again:
More than 300 rivers drain into Siberia's Lake Baikal, which holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined do.
After the comma = Conjunction + Noun + Verb
conjunction = "than" is a subordinate conjunction
noun = "all the North American Great Lakes"
verb = "do"

The insect faced decline, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue.
After the comma = ____________ + _____________ + Verb
conjunction = MISSING
noun = implied by parallelism, "the insect"
verb = "is"

Unlike the first sentence, the second sentence is missing a CONJUNCTION that is absolutely necessary to complete the parallelism.
The sentences are not even that much alike --- the former has a comparison that involves the correct parallelism of two full clauses, and the latter, not a comparison, unsuccessfully attempts parallelism between two verbs of the same subject.

Does this make sense now?
Mike :-)



Hi Mike, I am really confused between Independent/dependent clauses and Parallelism after seeing your above posts.
I am in desperate need of clarity over these issues .

According to Independent clause definition: Two IC'S connected by Fanboys. (for,and,but....).

But in your blog , i have seen one of the sentence

George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and again under James Madison, to become only one of two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.

Subject : George Clinton , Verb : served
As per your post , you say for two verbs with same subject , the subject for second verb will be implied according to parallelism .But in the above sentence both subject and verb are implied .
But, the sentence after "and", is that a Independent clause ?
Please help me to understand the concept of when the subject is only implied and when both the subject and verb are implied to maintain the parallel structure


Apart from the above issue Mike, i had a interpretation of "comma +and"and just "and" in the following manner .

Whenever i see "comma +and", rather than checking for parallelism issue, i just only check for independent and dependent clause issue.

Whenever i see "and" joined by two sentences i just see whether sentences joined by "and" have a parallel marker.


But from the above sentence what i observe is even in sentences that have "comma + and" structure , your are checking whether they are in parallel or not .
Please help me understand the concept of when to check for Independent/dependent clauses and paralleism issue .

Help is appreciated.

Thanks in advance
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2014, 10:24
dheeraj24 wrote:
Hi Mike, I am really confused between Independent/dependent clauses and Parallelism after seeing your above posts.
I am in desperate need of clarity over these issues .

According to Independent clause definition: Two IC'S connected by Fanboys. (for,and,but....).

But in your blog , i have seen one of the sentence

George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and again under James Madison, to become only one of two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.

Subject : George Clinton , Verb : served
As per your post , you say for two verbs with same subject , the subject for second verb will be implied according to parallelism .But in the above sentence both subject and verb are implied .
But, the sentence after "and", is that a Independent clause ?
Please help me to understand the concept of when the subject is only implied and when both the subject and verb are implied to maintain the parallel structure


Apart from the above issue Mike, i had a interpretation of "comma +and"and just "and" in the following manner .

Whenever i see "comma +and", rather than checking for parallelism issue, i just only check for independent and dependent clause issue.

Whenever i see "and" joined by two sentences i just see whether sentences joined by "and" have a parallel marker.


But from the above sentence what i observe is even in sentences that have "comma + and" structure , your are checking whether they are in parallel or not .
Please help me understand the concept of when to check for Independent/dependent clauses and paralleism issue .

Help is appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Dear dheeraj24,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

Parallelism is an extremely sophisticated topic. The GMAT loves it precisely because its not at all formulaic. Ultimately, parallelism is not simply a grammatical structure but a logical structure, and how the parallelism in a sentence works is inextricably connected to the logic of the meaning. This is an introductory blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/parallelis ... orrection/

The rule you have put forward --- "comma + and" = different clauses but "and without comma" = parallelism --- that is entirely too simplistic. There is NO FORMULA of any sort that you can use to spot parallelism. Parallelism is extremely flexible, and can operate at a number of levels. Furthermore, parallel structure can be intertwined with other modifying phrases and clauses, and rules for these may determine the commas.

You are perfectly correct that the FANBOYS conjunctions connect two independent clauses. It's also true that a large number of subordinate conjunctions connect a subordinate clause to an independent clause, and each would have a full [noun] + [verb] structure. It's also true that any noun or verb in any clause can be modified by additional phrases & clauses.

Now, the sentence you grabbed was a particular difficult one because it's an example of one in which several repeated words have been dropped in parallel structure. You quoted choice (A), which has a few grammatical flaws. Here's (C), the OA.
George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and again under James Madison, becoming one of only two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.
First, I'll say that comma after "Thomas Jefferson" is a stylistic choice --- some people would say it belongs there, and others would say it doesn't. Perhaps the sentence would be slightly more clear without it. Understand, though: grammar is not mathematics. It's not all about black & white right & wrong choices. Sometimes, for example, a comma could either be present or absent and it would be OK either way. It's wrong to invest commas with the absolute certainty you have posited.
Here's one of the very tricky things about parallelism, which I discuss in the blog from which you took this sentence ---- ANY repeated words can be dropped in the second branch of the parallelism --- we can drop both the noun & the verb if they are the same. Notice, though, the FANBOYS conjunction joining the two clauses is non-negotiable: that absolutely has to be there. That was precisely the problem in the sentence aditya8062 was quoting above ---- the conjunction was missing.
Here's the sentence again, with the repeated word added in a different color:
George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and George Clinton served as Vice President again under James Madison, becoming one of only two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.
All those words in green can be dropped because they are implied by the parallel structure. Use of the same preposition, "under," signals exactly how the two clauses logically correspond to one another.

That trick, dropping common words in parallel structure, is one of the GMAT's absolute favorite tricks. I would suggest reading all the articles about parallelism on that free blog.

Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :-)
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2014, 12:08
mikemcgarry wrote:
dheeraj24 wrote:
Hi Mike, I am really confused between Independent/dependent clauses and Parallelism after seeing your above posts.
I am in desperate need of clarity over these issues .

According to Independent clause definition: Two IC'S connected by Fanboys. (for,and,but....).

But in your blog , i have seen one of the sentence

George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and again under James Madison, to become only one of two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.

Subject : George Clinton , Verb : served
As per your post , you say for two verbs with same subject , the subject for second verb will be implied according to parallelism .But in the above sentence both subject and verb are implied .
But, the sentence after "and", is that a Independent clause ?
Please help me to understand the concept of when the subject is only implied and when both the subject and verb are implied to maintain the parallel structure


Apart from the above issue Mike, i had a interpretation of "comma +and"and just "and" in the following manner .

Whenever i see "comma +and", rather than checking for parallelism issue, i just only check for independent and dependent clause issue.

Whenever i see "and" joined by two sentences i just see whether sentences joined by "and" have a parallel marker.


But from the above sentence what i observe is even in sentences that have "comma + and" structure , your are checking whether they are in parallel or not .
Please help me understand the concept of when to check for Independent/dependent clauses and paralleism issue .

Help is appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Dear dheeraj24,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

Parallelism is an extremely sophisticated topic. The GMAT loves it precisely because its not at all formulaic. Ultimately, parallelism is not simply a grammatical structure but a logical structure, and how the parallelism in a sentence works is inextricably connected to the logic of the meaning. This is an introductory blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/parallelis ... orrection/

The rule you have put forward --- "comma + and" = different clauses but "and without comma" = parallelism --- that is entirely too simplistic. There is NO FORMULA of any sort that you can use to spot parallelism. Parallelism is extremely flexible, and can operate at a number of levels. Furthermore, parallel structure can be intertwined with other modifying phrases and clauses, and rules for these may determine the commas.

You are perfectly correct that the FANBOYS conjunctions connect two independent clauses. It's also true that a large number of subordinate conjunctions connect a subordinate clause to an independent clause, and each would have a full [noun] + [verb] structure. It's also true that any noun or verb in any clause can be modified by additional phrases & clauses.

Now, the sentence you grabbed was a particular difficult one because it's an example of one in which several repeated words have been dropped in parallel structure. You quoted choice (A), which has a few grammatical flaws. Here's (C), the OA.
George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and again under James Madison, becoming one of only two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.
First, I'll say that comma after "Thomas Jefferson" is a stylistic choice --- some people would say it belongs there, and others would say it doesn't. Perhaps the sentence would be slightly more clear without it. Understand, though: grammar is not mathematics. It's not all about black & white right & wrong choices. Sometimes, for example, a comma could either be present or absent and it would be OK either way. It's wrong to invest commas with the absolute certainty you have posited.
Here's one of the very tricky things about parallelism, which I discuss in the blog from which you took this sentence ---- ANY repeated words can be dropped in the second branch of the parallelism --- we can drop both the noun & the verb if they are the same. Notice, though, the FANBOYS conjunction joining the two clauses is non-negotiable: that absolutely has to be there. That was precisely the problem in the sentence aditya8062 was quoting above ---- the conjunction was missing.
Here's the sentence again, with the repeated word added in a different color:
George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and George Clinton served as Vice President again under James Madison, becoming one of only two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.
All those words in green can be dropped because they are implied by the parallel structure. Use of the same preposition, "under," signals exactly how the two clauses logically correspond to one another.

That trick, dropping common words in parallel structure, is one of the GMAT's absolute favorite tricks. I would suggest reading all the articles about parallelism on that free blog.

Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :-)



Thanks Mike, i think i have got the central idea behind the screen.
George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and George Clinton served as Vice President again under James Madison, becoming one of only two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.

In the above question, As i understand as both parts of sentences before and after "and" are having the same subject and verb , so that both the subject and verb can be implied. Thus maintains parallelism.

When checking for Independent clause issue (comma +and) ,The mistake that i committed was that i omitted the intended subject/verb and checked for Independent clause issue .we have to think in mind about the implied subject and verb which is not present in second part.
George Clinton served as Vice President again under James Madison is perfectly an independent clause.
So , i think we should be very careful about interpreting these kinds of sentences.

Mike , could you please tell me whether my interpretation is correct .

Thanks in advance.
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2014, 12:44
dheeraj24 wrote:
Thanks Mike, i think i have got the central idea behind the screen.
George Clinton, the governor of New York for many years, served as Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, and George Clinton served as Vice President again under James Madison, becoming one of only two men to serve as Vice-President under two different US Presidents.

In the above question, As i understand as both parts of sentences before and after "and" are having the same subject and verb , so that both the subject and verb can be implied. Thus maintains parallelism.

When checking for Independent clause issue (comma +and) ,The mistake that i committed was that i omitted the intended subject/verb and checked for Independent clause issue .we have to think in mind about the implied subject and verb which is not present in second part.
George Clinton served as Vice President again under James Madison is perfectly an independent clause.
So , i think we should be very careful about interpreting these kinds of sentences.

Mike , could you please tell me whether my interpretation is correct .

Thanks in advance.

Dear dheeraj24,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First, allow me to point out a few minor things about your written English.
1) The pronoun "I" is always capitalized, 100% of the time.
2) We do not capitalize after commas
3) There is never a space before a comma or a period, and always one after
These are hard things for non-native speakers to remember, and they are very important --- if you were to make these errors in your personal statement to business school, then adcom might unfairly assume that your English is at a lower standard than it really is.

Yes, whenever there is parallelism, there could be either an implied subject or an implied verb or both. This is what is so incredibly difficult about GMAT SC --- you have to think about the meaning of the sentence before you can start diving into analysis of the individual grammar concerns. Parallelism is a particularly tricky topic: I have been teaching the GMAT for a few years now, and even I never take parallelism for granted. It's a topic of endless subtleties.

I hope this helps.
Mike :-)
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2014, 06:09
Dear sir
Please explain.
How come the following sentence is parellal
The insect faced decline, and now is the focus of ..
I thought that faced and is are not parellal since the time lines do not match.
Thank you
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2014, 10:08
1
donx2000 wrote:
Dear sir
Please explain.
How come the following sentence is parellal
The insect faced decline, and now is the focus of ..
I thought that faced and is are not parellal since the time lines do not match.
Thank you

Dear donx2000,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

This is one of the BIG FALLACIES that students believe about Parallelism. Verbs in parallel DO NOT have to have the same tense. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... rb-tenses/
Present and past verbs can be in parallel. Transitive and intransitive verbs can be in parallel. Active and passive verbs can be in parallel A verb in the ordinary indicative mood and a verb in the subjunctive mood can be in parallel. ANY valid verb form can be in parallel with ANY OTHER valid verb form.

Alexander Hamilton vigorously defended the US Constitution and would be revered even more had he the opportunity to serve as President.

That sentence has perfect Parallelism and could be the correct answer on a GMAT SC. The first verb, "defended," is past tense active, and the second verb, "would be revered," is present conditional tense and passive. Those differences don't matter in the least. Both are valid verbs, so the parallelism is 100% correct.

Parallelism is not about an exact matching down to minute grammatical details. Parallelism is as much about logic, meaning, and rhetoric as it is about grammar. You always have to thinking at several levels of analysis at once to understand parallelism.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2015, 12:04
mikemcgarry wrote:
tusharGupta1 wrote:
The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines in habitat on both the Central American and Canadian ends of its range for decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue.

A ) decades, now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue
B ) decades, has now become the focus of an urgent rescue push
C ) decades, and now is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue
D ) decades now, is the focus of an urgent push for a rescue
E ) decades; now is the focus of an urgent rescue push

Dear tusharGupta1,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

At the beginning of the sentence, we have the main subject ("the insect"), a participial modifying clause, then the main verb ("faced"), then a direct object ("declines") then a long string of prepositional phrases modifying the direct object. Drop all the "fluff" and just put in the essential structure words:

(A) The insect faced decline, now is the focus ... RUN-ON, needs an "and" or other conjunction
(B) The insect faced decline, has now become the focus ... RUN-ON, needs an "and" or other conjunction
(C) The insect faced decline, and now is the focus ... proper parallelism between two verbs
(D) The insect faced decline now, is the focus ... Same mistake as (A), and the word "now" is in the wrong place
(E) The insect faced decline; now is the focus ... we would need a full clause after the semicolon, and what follows the semicolon here is a fragment, a verb-phrase with no subject

See this blog for more on Run-On sentences:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/run-on-sen ... questions/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi mike,

I have a query here. in option C The insect faced decline, and now is the focus . because subject is same so we are not repeating it after ,And. but in option E when we define 2 independent clause using semicolon; then we need to add subject in each clause even subject is same.

please clarify

Thanks.
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2015, 16:15
PathFinder007 wrote:
Hi mike,

I have a query here. in option C The insect faced decline, and now is the focus . because subject is same so we are not repeating it after ,And. but in option E when we define 2 independent clause using semicolon; then we need to add subject in each clause even subject is same.

please clarify. Thanks.

Dear PathFinder007,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

I don't know how much you understand the nature of a semicolon.

If we simply have a single subject and two verbs in parallel, we need the word "and" joining the two verb phrases, and we may also use a comma if, as here, the individual phrases are long. The comma is only used if it adds to the clarity of the entire sentence.
The CEO canceled his talk at the symposium and flew back to headquarters. = short verb phrases, no comma needed
The CEO canceled his talk at the new technologies symposium announcing his company's upcoming release of the Terabyte Home System, and flew back to headquarters to oversee the crisis in production. = comma used, because the long sentence needs organization

All kinds of grammatical relationships can cross a comma. A comma is a very weak break.

A semicolon is a very strong break. No grammar crosses a semicolon. Only logic and meaning cross a semicolon. As a general rule, if a sentence has a semicolon break, each "piece" should be a full complete sentence by itself, each capable of standing alone on its own as a full sentence, and something about the logic of the author's argument involves binding these two independent units into a single sentence with a semicolon. When to use a semicolon to bind two independent elements, and when to leave them separate as two individual sentences----that is a very subtle and sophisticated issue that the GMAT definitely is not going to test.

You can get a much better sense of the proper use of a semicolon if you do sophisticated reading. See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-imp ... bal-score/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2015, 07:09
mikemcgarry wrote:
PathFinder007 wrote:
Hi mike,

I have a query here. in option C The insect faced decline, and now is the focus . because subject is same so we are not repeating it after ,And. but in option E when we define 2 independent clause using semicolon; then we need to add subject in each clause even subject is same.

please clarify. Thanks.

Dear PathFinder007,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

I don't know how much you understand the nature of a semicolon.

If we simply have a single subject and two verbs in parallel, we need the word "and" joining the two verb phrases, and we may also use a comma if, as here, the individual phrases are long. The comma is only used if it adds to the clarity of the entire sentence.
The CEO canceled his talk at the symposium and flew back to headquarters. = short verb phrases, no comma needed
The CEO canceled his talk at the new technologies symposium announcing his company's upcoming release of the Terabyte Home System, and flew back to headquarters to oversee the crisis in production. = comma used, because the long sentence needs organization

All kinds of grammatical relationships can cross a comma. A comma is a very weak break.

A semicolon is a very strong break. No grammar crosses a semicolon. Only logic and meaning cross a semicolon. As a general rule, if a sentence has a semicolon break, each "piece" should be a full complete sentence by itself, each capable of standing alone on its own as a full sentence, and something about the logic of the author's argument involves binding these two independent units into a single sentence with a semicolon. When to use a semicolon to bind two independent elements, and when to leave them separate as two individual sentences----that is a very subtle and sophisticated issue that the GMAT definitely is not going to test.

You can get a much better sense of the proper use of a semicolon if you do sophisticated reading. See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-imp ... bal-score/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Thanks Mike. now its crystal clear.
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Dec 2015, 07:39
mikemcgarry wrote:

If we simply have a single subject and two verbs in parallel, we need the word "and" joining the two verb phrases, and we may also use a comma if, as here, the individual phrases are long. The comma is only used if it adds to the clarity of the entire sentence.
The CEO canceled his talk at the symposium and flew back to headquarters. = short verb phrases, no comma needed
The CEO canceled his talk at the new technologies symposium announcing his company's upcoming release of the Terabyte Home System, and flew back to headquarters to oversee the crisis in production. = comma used, because the long sentence needs organization

[/quote]

Dear mike,

Very well explained! Thank you so much! :) I have been making this mistake of searching for an IC after comma + FANBOYS and getting stumpted ever since I started prepping for GMAT SC, without clarity on the concept.
I hope the same principle applies to other co-ordinating conjunctions also!


Thanks in advance.
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Re: The insect, famed for its remarkable annual migrations, faced declines  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2018, 05:46
(A) “The insect faced declines…, now is the focus…” This is a clear comma splice error and is incorrect (needs a conjunction).

(B) “The insect faced declines…, has now become…” Same error as (A) – you need some type of conjunction

(C) “The insect faced declines.., and now is the focus…” CORRECT

(D) “The insect faced declines now…, is the focus…” Comma splice error.

(E) “The insect faced declines; now is the focus…” This improperly uses a semi-colon, as there is not a complete clause following it.

Answer is (C).
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