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The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio

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The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2019, 11:04
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Question Stats:

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The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio 11 : 14. After an appeal, their scores increase by the same amount and their new scores are in the ratio 47 : 56. The ratio of Bimal’s new score to that of his original score is

A 3 : 2
B 4 : 3
C 5 : 4
D 8 : 5
E 5:8
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Re: The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2019, 08:37
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Let scores increased by x.
=> \(\frac{(11 + x)}{(14 + x)}\) = 47:56

=> \(\frac{(11 + x)}{(14 + x)}\) = \(\frac{47}{56}\)

=> 616 + 56x = 658 + 47x

=> 9x = 42

=> x = \(\frac{42}{9}\)

=> x= \(\frac{14}{3}\)

The ratio of Bimal's new score to old score is (14 + \(\frac{14}{3}\)) / 14 = \(\frac{4}{3}\)

Hence Answer is (B)
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Re: The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 14:32
AbdulMalikVT wrote:
The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio 11 : 14. After an appeal, their scores increase by the same amount and their new scores are in the ratio 47 : 56. The ratio of Bimal’s new score to that of his original score is

A 3 : 2
B 4 : 3
C 5 : 4
D 8 : 5
E 5:8


Do you know if there is another way to solve this problem? If we do all this math, we never end below 2min;
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Re: The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 19:50
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yasminguedes wrote:
AbdulMalikVT wrote:
The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio 11 : 14. After an appeal, their scores increase by the same amount and their new scores are in the ratio 47 : 56. The ratio of Bimal’s new score to that of his original score is

A 3 : 2
B 4 : 3
C 5 : 4
D 8 : 5
E 5:8


Do you know if there is another way to solve this problem? If we do all this math, we never end below 2min;



IMO simplifying the above equation is fairly easy

Let scores increased by x.

=> \(\frac{(11 + x)}{(14 + x)}\) = \(\frac{47}{56}\)

=> 11*56 + 56x = 14*47 + 47x

=> 9x = 14*(47-44) taking 14 as common

=> x= \(\frac{14}{3}\) cancelling out 3 from both sides and simplifying directly


The ratio of Bimal's new score to old score is (14 + \(\frac{14}{3}\)) / 14 = \(\frac{4}{3}\)
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Re: The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2019, 00:20
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I open up 15-20 tabs with random DS and PS questions from this forum to do a mini quiz. This question was towards the end of that little quiz I was giving and I was short on time so I used a totally different approach. I could really use some help with the validity of this approach.

original ratio 11:14; gap = 3
new ratio 47:56; gap = 9

increased by 3x

Bimal's ratio 14->56 increased 4x

Possible ratios 3:4 or 4:3, because Bimal's score increased, it should be 4:3. Therefore, I pressed on B.

Now, was that a mere fluke and the approach is all hogwash or is that a thing that I don't know about? Or do I hail from a parallel universe and don't know about it yet.

Thanks in advance!
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Re: The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2019, 01:07
What is the question source?
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Re: The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2019, 19:29
AbdulMalikVT wrote:
The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio 11 : 14. After an appeal, their scores increase by the same amount and their new scores are in the ratio 47 : 56. The ratio of Bimal’s new score to that of his original score is

A 3 : 2
B 4 : 3
C 5 : 4
D 8 : 5
E 5:8



Let 11x and 14x be the original scores of Amal and Bimal and n be the increase in their scores. We can create the equation:

(11x + n)/(14x + n) = 47/56

56(11x + n) = 47(14x + n)

616x + 56n = 658x + 47n

9n = 42x

3n = 14x

At this point, we see that n can be 14 and x can be 3. If that is the case, the Bimal’s original score is 14(3) = 42 and his new score is 42 + 14 = 56. Therefore, the ratio of Bimal’s new score to that of his original score is 56/42 = 8/6 = 4/3.

Answer: B
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Re: The scores of Amal and Bimal in an examination are in the ratio   [#permalink] 02 Sep 2019, 19:29
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