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Re: The term blues is conventionally used to refer to a state of sadness [#permalink]
Can someone pls explain how for question 1, we reach to E answer choice? [The blues may be of psychological benefit to its listeners.]
where in the passage we see such reference?!
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The term blues is conventionally used to refer to a state of sadness [#permalink]
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nazii wrote:
Can someone pls explain how for question 1, we reach to E answer choice? [The blues may be of psychological benefit to its listeners.]
where in the passage we see such reference?!


Explanation


1. Based on the passage, with which one of the following statements would the author be most likely to agree?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

No help given, so no way to predict anything. We must simply check the choices in whatever order. The blues is analogous to a religious experience (lines 12-13: spirituals produce a religious experience and the blues elicits an analogous response.), but it’s still undeniably secular (line 14: characterized as a form of “secular spiritual.” ) and so (A)’s claim of transcendence into “organized religion” is inappropriate.

The author never mentions modern, plugged-in, urban blues, (B), so while it’s fun to speculate on what he’d think of it, we’re given no evidence either way.

Other folk art forms, (C), appear only in a side reference in lines 19-20: tapping into an aesthetic that underlies many aspects of African American culture. Critics have noted that African American folk tradition, in its earliest manifestations, does not sharply differentiate reality into sacred and secular strains or into irreconcilable dichotomies between good and evil, misery and joy. This is consistent with the apparently dual aspect of the blues and spirituals. which isn’t enough to justify (C), especially since “irony” doesn’t come in until 26 lines later.

Paragraph 4’s enthusiastic discussion of ironic blues lyrics gives the lie to (D)’s assertion that the musical structure is “primary” at creating tension. However, there are several references to the psychologically beneficial effects of the blues—lines 35-36: in creating the psychological conditions that are conducive to religious experience., 42-45: Working in this tradition, blues songs serve to transcend negative experiences by invoking the negative so that it can be transformed through the virtuosity and ecstatic mastery of the performer., and 51-56: One critic has observed that the impulse behind the blues is the desire to keep painful experiences alive in the performer and audience not just for their own sake, but also in order to coax from these experiences a lyricism that is both tragic and comic.—that bolster the author’s agreement with (E).

Answer: E
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Re: The term blues is conventionally used to refer to a state of sadness [#permalink]
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Passage Summary :

The passage discusses the deeper meaning of the blues musical genre beyond just expressing sadness or melancholy. Despite focusing on themes of suffering and self-pity, the blues aims to elicit a spiritual transformation in the listener, much like the traditional religious music known as spirituals. The two genres share a common cultural aesthetic and may arise from a common reservoir of experience. The passage suggests that the African American folk tradition does not sharply differentiate reality into sacred and secular strains, and that both spirituals and blues aim to transform the listener's spirit to elation and exaltation. Blues songs invoke negative experiences to transform them through the virtuosity and ecstatic mastery of the performer, producing a double-edged irony often evident in blues lyrics.
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Re: The term blues is conventionally used to refer to a state of sadness [#permalink]
Sajjad1994 wrote:
nazii wrote:
Can someone pls explain how for question 1, we reach to E answer choice? [The blues may be of psychological benefit to its listeners.]
where in the passage we see such reference?!


Explanation


1. Based on the passage, with which one of the following statements would the author be most likely to agree?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

No help given, so no way to predict anything. We must simply check the choices in whatever order. The blues is analogous to a religious experience (lines 12-13), but it’s still undeniably secular (line 14) and so (A)’s claim of transcendence into “organized religion” is inappropriate.

The author never mentions modern, plugged-in, urban blues, (B), so while it’s fun to speculate on what he’d think of it, we’re given no evidence either way.

Other folk art forms, (C), appear only in a side reference in lines 19-20 which isn’t enough to justify (C), especially since “irony” doesn’t come in until 26 lines later.

Paragraph 4’s enthusiastic discussion of ironic blues lyrics gives the lie to (D)’s assertion that the musical structure is “primary” at creating tension. However, there are several references to the psychologically beneficial effects of the blues—lines 35-36, 42-45, and 51-56—that bolster the author’s agreement with (E).

Answer: E



Hi Sajjad1994, how do we add the line nos in the text? Can i edit the text? If you can, please add the line nos here..
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Re: The term blues is conventionally used to refer to a state of sadness [#permalink]
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ashutosh_73 wrote:
Hi Sajjad1994, how do we add the line nos in the text? Can i edit the text? If you can, please add the line nos here..


Adding the line numbers is not essay and effective anymore. After updating the GC font size, all of the previously posted passages distorted w.r to the line numbers. I have highlighted the related terms in the passage and also added the related text in the quoted explanation.
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Re: The term blues is conventionally used to refer to a state of sadness [#permalink]
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