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The themes that Rita Dove explores in her poetry is universal, encompa

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CEO
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Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3274
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: The themes that Rita Dove explores in her poetry is universal, encompa  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2019, 21:50
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twister68 wrote:
AjiteshArun I completely agree that its an independent clause and that is not questionable. My point is that a noun modifier itself can also be an Independent clause. If “they” here is playing the role of noun modifier, then why are we categorizing this in comma splice. Or is it that noun modifier itself cannot be an IC
Hi twister68,

1. Your last point is correct. An independent clause is not a modifier. Instead, we have (in option C) a compound sentence (at least two independent clauses). In compound sentences, all clauses are equally important, and are joined by (normally) coordinating conjunctions (and, but, or...). Sometimes, we may use a semicolon to join two independent clauses, and (even more rarely) a comma may be used to join independent clauses. The last one, however, results in a comma splice, and comma splices are considered incorrect on the GMAT.

2. The they is not a modifier. A modifier (there are other things that modifiers can do) "changes" the thing that it modifies or provides more information about it (and some words can act as either pronouns or modifiers). The they however, does not modify the themes that Rita Dove explores in her poetry. It just provides us a way to refer to the themes... without actually using the whole noun phrase again.
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Re: The themes that Rita Dove explores in her poetry is universal, encompa  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2020, 23:53
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Option A: ‘the themes’ requires plural ‘are’ instead of singular ‘is’ in this sentence. Eliminate.

Option B: SVA error in this option as pointed out in option A. The clause "also it occasionally deals with " is separated only by a comma. This sentence is a run-on. Eliminate.

Option C: This is a run on sentence -two independent clauses that are connected by comma. "they + deals" is incorrect. Eliminate.

Option D: Best option. Subject and verb are in agreement.

Option E: Run-on sentence. The clause "also occasionally are dealing" does not have a subject. Eliminate.

Hope this helps!
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Re: The themes that Rita Dove explores in her poetry is universal, encompa   [#permalink] 19 Mar 2020, 23:53

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The themes that Rita Dove explores in her poetry is universal, encompa

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