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The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2014, 09:02
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North American continent into “hardiness zones.” These zones are based on the average winter temperature and are used to determine what types of plants will likely survive in a given area. Zone 1 represents the coldest average winter temperature and zone 13 the warmest. The zones are closely correlated with, but do not exactly match another set of eleven zones that indicate the length of the growing season. Minneapolis is in hardiness zone 4 and Denver is in hardiness zone 6.

Which of the following statements is most supported by the information above?

A. During the coming winter, the lowest recorded temperature in Minneapolis will be lower than the lowest recorded temperature in Denver.
B. The growing season in Denver is much longer than the growing season in Minneapolis.
C. A greater variety of plants can be grown in Denver, due to the warmer average winter low.
D. Factors other than average winter temperature affect the length of the growing season.
E. At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2014, 02:15
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AmoyV wrote:
The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North American continent into “hardiness zones.” These zones are based on the average winter temperature and are used to determine what types of plants will likely survive in a given area. Zone 1 represents the coldest average winter temperature and zone 13 the warmest. The zones are closely correlated with, but do not exactly match another set of eleven zones that indicate the length of the growing season. Minneapolis is in hardiness zone 4 and Denver is in hardiness zone 6.

Which of the following statements is most supported by the information above?

A. During the coming winter, the lowest recorded temperature in Minneapolis will be lower than the lowest recorded temperature in Denver.
B. The growing season in Denver is much longer than the growing season in Minneapolis.
C. A greater variety of plants can be grown in Denver, due to the warmer average winter low.
D. Factors other than average winter temperature affect the length of the growing season.
E. At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.


Responding to a pm:
There is absolutely no ambiguity in this question.

Premises:
- Hardiness zones are based on the average winter temperature and are used to determine what types of plants will likely survive in a given area.
- Zone 1 represents the coldest average winter temperature and zone 13 the warmest.
- The zones are correlated with, but do not exactly match another set of eleven zones that indicate the length of the growing season - probably colder means shorter growing season from common knowledge
- Minneapolis is in hardiness zone 4 and Denver is in hardiness zone 6.

A. During the coming winter, the lowest recorded temperature in Minneapolis will be lower than the lowest recorded temperature in Denver.
We only know about average temperatures, not lowest.

B. The growing season in Denver is much longer than the growing season in Minneapolis.
Hardiness zones do not match the eleven "length of growing season" zone.

C. A greater variety of plants can be grown in Denver, due to the warmer average winter low.
No information about whether more variety survives in warm climate or cold - we will not use our general knowledge.

D. Factors other than average winter temperature affect the length of the growing season.
It is given that zones are correlated but DO NOT match exactly. It means other factors also come into play. Correct answer.

E. At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.
If you feel that "city" vs "area/town/piece of land" is nitpicking, then that's not correct. Perhaps a small wild piece of land right next to Canada lies in the hardiness zones 1, 2 and 3. Perhaps only some forest/mountain region lies in the first 3 zones. Perhaps no city lies in these zones since a city invariably ends up being warmer than the wild due to industrial activity. We don't know.
- But more importantly, North American continent includes not just US but also Canada and Mexico. Hence, even if you ignore the difference between city/town etc, nothing says that a US city must lie in first three zones. US and North America are not interchangeable!
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2014, 09:29
@ original poster : i am really doubting this question !!
i do not find any reason to reject option E : At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.
can u please check the choices again
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2014, 10:35
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aditya8062 wrote:
@ original poster : i am really doubting this question !!
i do not find any reason to reject option E : At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.
can u please check the choices again


There is nothing that implies that the "zones" are cities. They are just areas.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2014, 10:56
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There is nothing that implies that the "zones" are cities. They are just areas.


so Denver and Minneapolis are areas !! not cities ?? after all some area will definitely comprise some city
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2014, 18:18
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aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
There is nothing that implies that the "zones" are cities. They are just areas.


so Denver and Minneapolis are areas !! not cities ?? after all some area will definitely comprise some city


Just as 1 city can comprise multiple hardiness zones (particularly if the city is big enough).
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2014, 21:46
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A) Passage talks about average temperatures, not lowest, so can't be A.

B) Could be true, but it says close correlation not exact. We'll leave it as a possible choice for now since it's vague.

C) Nothing in the passage suggests this.

D) The fact that length growing season and average winter temperature both have SEPARATE zones which are not exactly the same indicates that these 2 are not determined by the same factors. Strongest contender.

E) Minneapolis is 4, but passage does not suggest any other CITY is less than 4. Could be town, village, inland water body. First sentence says it's a division of the continent, not a division of urban agglomerations.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 02:10
aditya8062 wrote:
@ original poster : i am really doubting this question !!
i do not find any reason to reject option E : At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.
can u please check the choices again


I am in the same boat as you are in. I chose E too and was in for a shock. The source is Veritas Question Bank.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 02:14
justbequiet wrote:
aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
There is nothing that implies that the "zones" are cities. They are just areas.


so Denver and Minneapolis are areas !! not cities ?? after all some area will definitely comprise some city


Just as 1 city can comprise multiple hardiness zones (particularly if the city is big enough).


True. But nowhere in the stem is it mentioned that Denver and Minneapolis are cities. They could be individual zones themselves. Big cities can also be zones themselves.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 10:51
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I am in the same boat as you are in. I chose E too and was in for a shock. The source is Veritas Question Bank.


i will not be worried about this question as long as it is not official !! i do not think GMAC will ever get into the nitpicking of "area", "city" or "town"
also if someone is putting a logic that "cities" can be large enough to comprise more that one zone then the same argument can be put on the other side of story !! i mean why should we favor one side of the argument?

also if cities such as "Minneapolis" and "Denver" can have just one "zone" then we can definitely have other cities with just one "zone" ,after all there are cities smaller than Minneapolis !! (honestly i don't even want to get into this side of argument)
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2014, 09:02
Hardiness zones are divided based on two parameters - average winter temperature (13 zones) and length of growing season (11 zones).

The last sentence says "Minneapolis is in hardiness zone 4 and Denver is in hardiness zone 6". Do we know based on which parameter this statement is made? Average winter temperature or length of growing season? We don't know.

D: Zones based on two parameters closely correlate, but don't exactly match. So definitely there is some other factor which causes the mismatch.

E: We don't know about the parameter used to conclude the last sentence in the premise. So we can't definitely conclude this answer option.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2014, 02:17
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aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
I am in the same boat as you are in. I chose E too and was in for a shock. The source is Veritas Question Bank.


i will not be worried about this question as long as it is not official !! i do not think GMAC will ever get into the nitpicking of "area", "city" or "town"
also if someone is putting a logic that "cities" can be large enough to comprise more that one zone then the same argument can be put on the other side of story !! i mean why should we favor one side of the argument?

also if cities such as "Minneapolis" and "Denver" can have just one "zone" then we can definitely have other cities with just one "zone" ,after all there are cities smaller than Minneapolis !! (honestly i don't even want to get into this side of argument)


Every word matters! Small differences in meaning can change the whole question!
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2014, 12:25
Thank god I got a convincing answer! Thanks Karishma!

None of the city, town or other things made any sense to me. But when u explained, I really felt like smacking my forehead for missing something so obvious. I guess I must be half asleep to not catch something so obvious :P
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Dec 2015, 09:16
The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North American continent into “hardiness zones.”
These zones are based on the average winter temperature and are used to determine what types of plants will likely survive in a given area.
Zone 1 represents the coldest average winter temperature and zone 13 the warmest.
The zones are closely correlated with, but do not exactly match another set of eleven zones that indicate the length of the growing season.
Minneapolis is in hardiness zone 4 and Denver is in hardiness zone 6.

Which of the following statements is most supported by the information above?

A. During the coming winter, the lowest recorded temperature in Minneapolis will be lower than the lowest recorded temperature in Denver.............we can infer that avg winter temp is lower but not lowest. new info.

B. The growing season in Denver is much longer than the growing season in Minneapolis...............this is new info as we don't any info in argument regarding growing season.

C. A greater variety of plants can be grown in Denver, due to the warmer average winter low..............we can decide type of plant in area based on zone avg winter temp not greater or fewer variety of plants.

D. Factors other than average winter temperature affect the length of the growing season..............can be true keep it at bay.

E. At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.............this cannot be inferred as atleast one city has a colder avg temp than does Minneapolis as the zones are divided among whole North American continent.

I got confused between C and D and sellected c since I felt D is too generalized. :wink:
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2017, 23:04
Quote:
D. Factors other than average winter temperature affect the length of the growing season.
It is given that zones are correlated but DO NOT match exactly. It means other factors also come into play. Correct answer.


Woul you please explain a little bit about it? How other factors come to play?
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2017, 09:43
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Mahmud6 wrote:
Quote:
D. Factors other than average winter temperature affect the length of the growing season.
It is given that zones are correlated but DO NOT match exactly. It means other factors also come into play. Correct answer.


Woul you please explain a little bit about it? How other factors come to play?



The argument gives you
"The zones are closely correlated with, but do not exactly match another set of eleven zones that indicate the length of the growing season. "

If the only factor that affected the length of the growing season was average winter temp, then the zones of length of growing season would have exactly matched the zones of temperatures. But the question tells us that they do not exactly match. So other factors such as "topography" could be playing a role in deciding the length of the growing season.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2017, 07:24
I don't really understand option B !! I ended up picking B over D !! Could you help me with the same ? The Growing season should be longer in Denver as it is in a warmer zone. Why is B wrong ?
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2018, 08:43
blizzArd wrote:
aditya8062 wrote:
@ original poster : i am really doubting this question !!
i do not find any reason to reject option E : At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.
can u please check the choices again


There is nothing that implies that the "zones" are cities. They are just areas.
D is the correct answer. E is incorrect. North America is US + CAN so E cant be correct.

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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 21:16
blizzArd wrote:
aditya8062 wrote:
@ original poster : i am really doubting this question !!
i do not find any reason to reject option E : At least one U.S. city has a colder average winter temperature than does Minneapolis.
can u please check the choices again


There is nothing that implies that the "zones" are cities. They are just areas.


Also, the argument talks about dividing the North American continent into hardiness zones and not just US.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 21:27
Passage: "The zones are closely correlated with, but do not exactly match another set of eleven zones that indicate the length of the growing season."
The zones are by average winter temperature.
Thus "Factors other than average winter temperature affect the length of the growing season." Answer D.
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Re: The U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the North America &nbs [#permalink] 13 Jun 2018, 21:27

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