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There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the si

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Re: There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the si  [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2020, 07:36
GMATNinja wrote:
pruekv wrote:
Hi GMAT Experts,

Can anyone please help explain what the clause "a circumstance that contributes to their depletion through overfishing," modifies? And if it is a modifier, why doesn't the "touch rule" applies here?

Thank you!
pruekv

The "circumstance" referred to is the fact that there are no legal limits on the size of monkfish that can be caught. And I wouldn't call this part ("circumstance...") a modifier. Instead, it's just some additional, comma-separated, information (i.e. "Che Guevara was a revolutionary, a man who changed the course of history in Latin America.")

The construction in choice (A) is really just an alternative for something like this:

    "There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the size of monkfish that can be caught. This circumstance contributes to their depletion through overfishing."

If you are okay with that last pair of sentences, then you should be okay with choice (A)!


Thank you GMATNinja !

Just one more follow up question on this topic. How would I know whether the clause or phrase following a comma is just an additional information or a modifier?

Thanks!
pruekv
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Re: There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the si  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2020, 12:17
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pruekv wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
pruekv wrote:
Hi GMAT Experts,

Can anyone please help explain what the clause "a circumstance that contributes to their depletion through overfishing," modifies? And if it is a modifier, why doesn't the "touch rule" applies here?

Thank you!
pruekv

The "circumstance" referred to is the fact that there are no legal limits on the size of monkfish that can be caught. And I wouldn't call this part ("circumstance...") a modifier. Instead, it's just some additional, comma-separated, information (i.e. "Che Guevara was a revolutionary, a man who changed the course of history in Latin America.")

The construction in choice (A) is really just an alternative for something like this:

    "There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the size of monkfish that can be caught. This circumstance contributes to their depletion through overfishing."

If you are okay with that last pair of sentences, then you should be okay with choice (A)!


Thank you GMATNinja !

Just one more follow up question on this topic. How would I know whether the clause or phrase following a comma is just an additional information or a modifier?

Thanks!
pruekv

Unfortunately, I don't have a very satisfying answer for you. There are no specific rules or guidelines for deciding whether the clause or phrase following a comma is just additional information or a modifier -- you just have to think through the meaning of each individual sentence.

For whatever it's worth, I'm also not sure that the distinction matters all that much. You're trying to pick the most correct and logical sentence out of the five choices you're given, and it's very unlikely that the distinction between a modifier and additional information will be the deciding factor between two answer choices. So I wouldn't lose too much sleep over it.

I hope this helps a bit!
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Re: There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the si  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2020, 23:18
GMATNinja wrote:
pruekv wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
pruekv wrote:
Hi GMAT Experts,

Can anyone please help explain what the clause "a circumstance that contributes to their depletion through overfishing," modifies? And if it is a modifier, why doesn't the "touch rule" applies here?

Thank you!
pruekv

The "circumstance" referred to is the fact that there are no legal limits on the size of monkfish that can be caught. And I wouldn't call this part ("circumstance...") a modifier. Instead, it's just some additional, comma-separated, information (i.e. "Che Guevara was a revolutionary, a man who changed the course of history in Latin America.")

The construction in choice (A) is really just an alternative for something like this:

    "There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the size of monkfish that can be caught. This circumstance contributes to their depletion through overfishing."

If you are okay with that last pair of sentences, then you should be okay with choice (A)!


Thank you GMATNinja !

Just one more follow up question on this topic. How would I know whether the clause or phrase following a comma is just an additional information or a modifier?

Thanks!
pruekv

Unfortunately, I don't have a very satisfying answer for you. There are no specific rules or guidelines for deciding whether the clause or phrase following a comma is just additional information or a modifier -- you just have to think through the meaning of each individual sentence.

For whatever it's worth, I'm also not sure that the distinction matters all that much. You're trying to pick the most correct and logical sentence out of the five choices you're given, and it's very unlikely that the distinction between a modifier and additional information will be the deciding factor between two answer choices. So I wouldn't lose too much sleep over it.

I hope this helps a bit!



Sounds good! Thank you for the clarification once again.
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Re: There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the si  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2020, 10:03
Hi GMAT Experts, GMATNinja

Can anyone please help explain why is the FANBOYS rule not applicable in the case of option A? The bold part of the below sentence won't be treated as an independent clause?

There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the size of monkfish that can be caught, a circumstance that contributes to their depletion through overfishing.

Thank you!
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There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the si  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2020, 22:34
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apoorv1031 wrote:
There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the size of monkfish that can be caught, a circumstance that contributes to their depletion through overfishing.

Hi Apoorv, the portion you have put in bold, is actually not an Independent clause! It is called an absolute modifier (noun + noun modifier).

You can watch our video on Absolute modifiers.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Absolute modifier, its application and examples in significant detail. If you or someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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There are no legal limits, as there are for cod and haddock, on the si   [#permalink] 15 Jun 2020, 22:34

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