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This is from a popular source so there would be some

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This is from a popular source so there would be some [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2006, 17:25
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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54% (02:04) correct 46% (01:21) wrong based on 49 sessions

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This is from a popular source so there would be some "straight X" , "Give me Y" answers but let's see who explains this best ...

Math education in this country does a disservice to our children. In the lower grades, it should focus on the basic skills that students will need in higher grades to develop the ability to solve complex problems. Learning basic math skills is like learning the scales and chords that one will later use to master complicated concertos and symphonies. However, math educators in this country seem to have it backward, emphasizing in higher grades the same narrow, skills-based approach that students learned in lower grades rather than the analytical tools they will need to solve complex math problems.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion drawn above?

(A) While music is common in elementary school curriculums, it is rarely taught in high school.

(B) On international tests of math skills, high-school students in this country performed no worse than did their counterparts from countries where problem-solving is emphasized in higher grades.

(C) When presented with a math problem to solve, students in higher grades are more likely to arrive at different answers than students in lowers grades are.

(D) Older students tend to receive higher grades in math than do younger students.

(E) Universities in this country report a steady increase in the percentage of native first-year students who qualify to take advanced mathematics courses such as calculus.
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New post 26 Nov 2006, 19:06
According to the passage, math education in this country does a disservice to the children because it does not follow the author’s “preferred approachâ€

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Re: CR : Interesting one [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2006, 19:28
Swagatalakshmi wrote:
This is from a popular source so there would be some "straight X" , "Give me Y" answers but let's see who explains this best ...

Math education in this country does a disservice to our children. In the lower grades, it should focus on the basic skills that students will need in higher grades to develop the ability to solve complex problems. Learning basic math skills is like learning the scales and chords that one will later use to master complicated concertos and symphonies. However, math educators in this country seem to have it backward, emphasizing in higher grades the same narrow, skills-based approach that students learned in lower grades rather than the analytical tools they will need to solve complex math problems.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion drawn above?

(A) While music is common in elementary school curriculums, it is rarely taught in high school.

(B) On international tests of math skills, high-school students in this country performed no worse than did their counterparts from countries where problem-solving is emphasized in higher grades.

(C) When presented with a math problem to solve, students in higher grades are more likely to arrive at different answers than students in lowers grades are.

If the students are still being taught with the narrow methods as they were taught in lower gardes then the answers should be consisitent. But they are coming with different answers means they are thinking whether right or wrong :-D

(D) Older students tend to receive higher grades in math than do younger students.

(E) Universities in this country report a steady increase in the percentage of native first-year students who qualify to take advanced mathematics courses such as calculus.

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New post 26 Nov 2006, 19:35
Conclusion:
"math educators in this country seem to have it backward, emphasizing in higher grades the same narrow, skills-based approach that students learned in lower grades rather than the analytical tools they will need to solve complex math problems. "

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion drawn above?

(A) While music is common in elementary school curriculums, it is rarely taught in high school.
>>>out of scope

(B) On international tests of math skills, high-school students in this country performed no worse than did their counterparts from countries where problem-solving is emphasized in higher grades.
>>>Weakens

(C) When presented with a math problem to solve, students in higher grades are more likely to arrive at different answers than students in lowers grades are.
>>>Does not weaken or strengthen

(D) Older students tend to receive higher grades in math than do younger students.
>>>Strengthen

(E) Universities in this country report a steady increase in the percentage of native first-year students who qualify to take advanced mathematics courses such as calculus.
>>>weakens

Between B and E, I choose B because it is more in context with the conclusion drawn esp:emphasis in problem solving in lower and higher grades
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New post 26 Nov 2006, 19:52
Swagatalakshmi wrote:
This is from a popular source so there would be some "straight X" , "Give me Y" answers but let's see who explains this best ...

Math education in this country does a disservice to our children. In the lower grades, it should focus on the basic skills that students will need in higher grades to develop the ability to solve complex problems. Learning basic math skills is like learning the scales and chords that one will later use to master complicated concertos and symphonies. However, math educators in this country seem to have it backward, emphasizing in higher grades the same narrow, skills-based approach that students learned in lower grades rather than the analytical tools they will need to solve complex math problems.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion drawn above?

(A) While music is common in elementary school curriculums, it is rarely taught in high school.

(B) On international tests of math skills, high-school students in this country performed no worse than did their counterparts from countries where problem-solving is emphasized in higher grades.

Going with B. Argument says "Math education in this country does a disservice to our children." But the performance of the students is as good as in countries that have problem-solving as the focus.

However, I am not clear whether "problem-solving in higher grades" is the desired mode of math education expressed in the argument.


(C) When presented with a math problem to solve, students in higher grades are more likely to arrive at different answers than students in lowers grades are.

(D) Older students tend to receive higher grades in math than do younger students.

(E) Universities in this country report a steady increase in the percentage of native first-year students who qualify to take advanced mathematics courses such as calculus.

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New post 27 Nov 2006, 01:08
I like E though.

A C D are certainly out of scope.

I feel B is not as strong as E is.

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New post 27 Nov 2006, 07:30
I will go with E too


(A) While music is common in elementary school curriculums, it is rarely taught in high school.
not relevant
(B) On international tests of math skills, high-school students in this country performed no worse than did their counterparts from countries where problem-solving is emphasized in higher grades.
International test of math skills - don’t know this test is of basic maths skills or complex problems … this para is about learning the skill to solve complex problems

(C) When presented with a math problem to solve, students in higher grades are more likely to arrive at different answers than students in lowers grades are.

Higher grades and lower grades students are solving the same basic mathematics

(D) Older students tend to receive higher grades in math than do younger students.
Irrelevant , cann’t say if higher grades are solving complex problems

(E) Universities in this country report a steady increase in the percentage of native first-year students who qualify to take advanced mathematics courses such as calculus.
Now students are qualifying for advanced mathematics courses … so the students are aware of complex mathematical skills.

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New post 27 Nov 2006, 07:47
B seems right. Though E is somewhat close.

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New post 27 Nov 2006, 09:29
AK wrote:
I will go with E too


(A) While music is common in elementary school curriculums, it is rarely taught in high school.
not relevant
(B) On international tests of math skills, high-school students in this country performed no worse than did their counterparts from countries where problem-solving is emphasized in higher grades.
International test of math skills - don’t know this test is of basic maths skills or complex problems … this para is about learning the skill to solve complex problems

(C) When presented with a math problem to solve, students in higher grades are more likely to arrive at different answers than students in lowers grades are.

Higher grades and lower grades students are solving the same basic mathematics

(D) Older students tend to receive higher grades in math than do younger students.
Irrelevant , cann’t say if higher grades are solving complex problems

(E) Universities in this country report a steady increase in the percentage of native first-year students who qualify to take advanced mathematics courses such as calculus.
Now students are qualifying for advanced mathematics courses … so the students are aware of complex mathematical skills.


This CR's wording is too complicated. We need to make many assumptions. If we have to agree with E, then we need to assume that Calculus will have complex math problems and we need analytical tools to solve those complex math problems. How can we assume that? :)
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New post 27 Nov 2006, 09:39
ak_idc wrote:


This CR's wording is too complicated. We need to make many assumptions. If we have to agree with E, then we need to assume that Calculus will have complex math problems and we need analytical tools to solve those complex math problems. How can we assume that? :)



I assumed this from wordings ...... advanced mathematics courses such as calculus

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New post 27 Nov 2006, 18:13
This is from manhattan's QB.
OA=E
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New post 27 Nov 2006, 18:38
In most weakening and strengthening questions, new and extra information is usually a good sign if you can interpret it right. they are not out of scope.

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New post 05 Sep 2013, 04:03
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The correct answer is E. The conclusion of the argument is that "math education
in this country does a disservice to our children." Why? Because math teachers
emphasize "in higher grades the same narrow, skills-based approach that
students learned in lower grades rather than the analytical tools they will need to
solve complex math problems." In order to weaken the conclusion, we need to
show that this approach has not had a negative effect on children's math skills.
Choice E states that an increasing percentage of native first-year students qualify
to take advanced math courses in college. This would seem to suggest that more
children are prepared for advanced math than had previously been the case,
thus weakening the conclusion of the argument.

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Re: This is from a popular source so there would be some [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2015, 23:30
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I was confused between B & E for quite some time, but eventually chose the right answer, E. So let me pen down my thoughts on why E.

(B) On international tests of math skills, high-school students in this country performed no worse than did their counterparts from countries where problem-solving is emphasized in higher grades. - Even if they did perform on par with foreign students, does that mean we are NOT doing disservice to our students? Of course we are. Because we are focused on improving "our" students.

(E) Universities in this country report a steady increase in the percentage of native first-year students who qualify to take advanced mathematics courses such as calculus. - If there is an increase in students from high school to universities, and who also qualify to take advanced courses, then it proves that whatever they studied in the last school has definitely helped them make this transition and "qualify" for it.
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Re: This is from a popular source so there would be some [#permalink]

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Re: This is from a popular source so there would be some   [#permalink] 20 Oct 2017, 05:04
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