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To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom

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To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2009, 18:06
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A
B
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D
E

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To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with that of ordinary grape juice.

(A) To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the
pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice.
(B) To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is comparing the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with that of ordinary grape juice.
(C) Comparing the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with ordinary grape juice.
(D) Comparing the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is like comparing the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with ordinary grape juice.
(E) To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare a fine wine’s bouquet with ordinary grape juice’s bouquet.


please explain...

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2009, 18:32
I see only D and A remaining but both have an issue

D is trying to equate action X to Y.

A uses that of? isnt the comparison broken?

A seems to be the lesser of the evil

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2009, 03:56
I'd still go with D.

Please post the OA.

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2009, 04:44
Yup..D looks better than others.
OA?

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2009, 12:40
i'll go with A.

comparing with should satisfy parallelism. So exquisite bouquet of fine wine cannot be comapred with ordinary grape juice..It should be preceded by 'that of'..or something along the lines.

Plus..for explanatory sentences such as these, I think infinitives are better than gerunds.

OA?

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2009, 20:00
Guys, whats wrong with E?
D--bouquet of a fine wine with ordinary grape juice. It does not look good to me.
A--To be honest, I did not find any problem. But E is more concise,it uses less adjectives.

Whats the OA?

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2009, 22:30
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(A) To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the
pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice.

(B) To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is comparing the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with that f ordinary grape juice. – compare vs comparing.

(C) Comparing the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with ordinary grape juice. – compare vs comparing.

(D) Comparing the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is like comparing the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with ordinary grape juice.- we are comparing bouquet of wine with grape juice.

(E) To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare a fine wine’s bouquet with ordinary grape juice’s bouquet.- parallelism as we are comparing the lightning fast to wine’s bouquet.

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2009, 05:52
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OA is A

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2009, 11:35
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To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with that of ordinary grape juice.

Two rules that I used to make my ans choice -

a) Compare To unlike things. (X compare to Y - X and Y are unlike things)
Compare with like things (X compare with Y - X and Y are like things)

b) Here "is", a linking verb, is acting as a parallel marker. X is Y ==> X and Y should be parallel.

From the choices given, the formats are

a) To compare.....IS to compare.....
b) To compare......IS comparing...... (Out of the game. Not parallel)
c) comparing.....IS to compare....(Out of the game. Not parallel)
d) Comparing......is Like Comparing.....(Out of the game. Not parallel. In addition as per rule 1, compare with should be used to compare like things. Here comparing [the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine] with [ordinary grape juice]. The exquisite bouquet of a fine wine and ordinary grape juice are not like things.)
E) To compare.....IS to compare.....

Now with A and E in the race, I see that the two choice are different in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" and "compare a fine wine’s bouquet with ordinary grape juice’s bouquet". When possessives such as fine wine's bouquet are used, I would prefer to use a phrase that eliminates possessives.

So I would vote for A because, in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" it is comparing the exquisite bouquet of fine wine with that(exquisite bouquet) of ordinary grape juice.

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2009, 12:50
mrsmarthi wrote:
To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with that of ordinary grape juice.

Two rules that I used to make my ans choice -

a) Compare To unlike things. (X compare to Y - X and Y are unlike things)
Compare with like things (X compare with Y - X and Y are like things)

b) Here "is", a linking verb, is acting as a parallel marker. X is Y ==> X and Y should be parallel.

From the choices given, the formats are

a) To compare.....IS to compare.....
b) To compare......IS comparing...... (Out of the game. Not parallel)
c) comparing.....IS to compare....(Out of the game. Not parallel)
d) Comparing......is Like Comparing.....(Out of the game. Not parallel. In addition as per rule 1, compare with should be used to compare like things. Here comparing [the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine] with [ordinary grape juice]. The exquisite bouquet of a fine wine and ordinary grape juice are not like things.)
E) To compare.....IS to compare.....

Now with A and E in the race, I see that the two choice are different in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" and "compare a fine wine’s bouquet with ordinary grape juice’s bouquet". When possessives such as fine wine's bouquet are used, I would prefer to use a phrase that eliminates possessives.

So I would vote for A because, in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" it is comparing the exquisite bouquet of fine wine with that(exquisite bouquet) of ordinary grape juice.

What is your view about " fine, wine" in A? ( the comma )..what does the comma suggest?

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2009, 19:24
Economist,

In fact, I didn't even bother to look at option A so closely as you did. I am under the impression that A must have repeated the entire sentence. And in the original sentence, there is NO comma between fine and wine. According to my explanations, I am left with option A since that should have repeated the original sentence.

Obviously, I assume that comma might have been misplaced. If this not the case, then E will be the ans.

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2009, 19:26
Economist wrote:
mrsmarthi wrote:
To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with that of ordinary grape juice.

Two rules that I used to make my ans choice -

a) Compare To unlike things. (X compare to Y - X and Y are unlike things)
Compare with like things (X compare with Y - X and Y are like things)

b) Here "is", a linking verb, is acting as a parallel marker. X is Y ==> X and Y should be parallel.

From the choices given, the formats are

a) To compare.....IS to compare.....
b) To compare......IS comparing...... (Out of the game. Not parallel)
c) comparing.....IS to compare....(Out of the game. Not parallel)
d) Comparing......is Like Comparing.....(Out of the game. Not parallel. In addition as per rule 1, compare with should be used to compare like things. Here comparing [the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine] with [ordinary grape juice]. The exquisite bouquet of a fine wine and ordinary grape juice are not like things.)
E) To compare.....IS to compare.....

Now with A and E in the race, I see that the two choice are different in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" and "compare a fine wine’s bouquet with ordinary grape juice’s bouquet". When possessives such as fine wine's bouquet are used, I would prefer to use a phrase that eliminates possessives.

So I would vote for A because, in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" it is comparing the exquisite bouquet of fine wine with that(exquisite bouquet) of ordinary grape juice.

What is your view about " fine, wine" in A? ( the comma )..what does the comma suggest?


comma is not in the original sentence, i think it is a typo..i wil go with A too.

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Re: SC Tom Stoppard [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2009, 19:52
Economist wrote:
mrsmarthi wrote:
To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom Stoppard with the pedestrian efforts of some of his contemporaries is to compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine with that of ordinary grape juice.

Two rules that I used to make my ans choice -

a) Compare To unlike things. (X compare to Y - X and Y are unlike things)
Compare with like things (X compare with Y - X and Y are like things)

b) Here "is", a linking verb, is acting as a parallel marker. X is Y ==> X and Y should be parallel.

From the choices given, the formats are

a) To compare.....IS to compare.....
b) To compare......IS comparing...... (Out of the game. Not parallel)
c) comparing.....IS to compare....(Out of the game. Not parallel)
d) Comparing......is Like Comparing.....(Out of the game. Not parallel. In addition as per rule 1, compare with should be used to compare like things. Here comparing [the exquisite bouquet of a fine wine] with [ordinary grape juice]. The exquisite bouquet of a fine wine and ordinary grape juice are not like things.)
E) To compare.....IS to compare.....

Now with A and E in the race, I see that the two choice are different in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" and "compare a fine wine’s bouquet with ordinary grape juice’s bouquet". When possessives such as fine wine's bouquet are used, I would prefer to use a phrase that eliminates possessives.

So I would vote for A because, in "compare the exquisite bouquet of a fine, wine with that of ordinary grape juice" it is comparing the exquisite bouquet of fine wine with that(exquisite bouquet) of ordinary grape juice.

What is your view about " fine, wine" in A? ( the comma )..what does the comma suggest?


Thats a typo. Refer to original sentence.

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Re: To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2014, 16:44
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Re: To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom [#permalink]

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New post 14 Dec 2017, 10:17
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

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Re: To compare the lightning-fast genius of playwright Tom   [#permalink] 14 Dec 2017, 10:17
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