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Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of

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Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2019, 14:29
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A
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Question Stats:

82% (00:48) correct 18% (00:46) wrong based on 116 sessions

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Project SC Butler: Day 80: Sentence Correction (SC1)


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Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of qualifying for the 1965 Olympics and later worked as stuntman, is also a brilliant mind who is credited as the invention of the wind-up radio.

(A) who is credited as

(B) that credited as

(C) that is credited with

(D) who is credited with

(E) who is credited with having


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There may be no best/excellent answers, or a there may be a few excellent answers!

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Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 26 Jan 2019, 22:07
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IMO Answer D.

A. Stuntman is not credited 'as' the invention, stuntman is credited 'with'. Hence ruled out.
B. Same reason as A.
C. Use of 'that' suggest subject is non living.
D. Removes all the above errors. Use of 'who' is correct as it is used for persons, credited 'as' : correct.
E. Wordy.

Originally posted by aytidagupta on 25 Jan 2019, 15:13.
Last edited by aytidagupta on 26 Jan 2019, 22:07, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2019, 07:03
Sentence Analysis:
Trevor Baylis,details about Trever i.e (modifier), is also a brilliant mind .....credited with.....

It would be Incorrect to use Credited as...., Trever or his mind is not credited as invention...so optiona A and B is out.

It's not his mind- that is credited as- so option C is out.
Option E incorrectly says about having an invention,
so option D is concise and correct in meaning.

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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2019, 09:05
Official Explanation :

The correct idiom is credited with, so eliminate (A) and (B), choice (C) has the correct idiom, but replaces who with that. Always use who when referring to people.

Choice (E) adds an extra unnecessary word, which changes the meaning of the sentence.

Choice (D) contains the correct idiom, and is the correct answer.
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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2019, 07:07
sudarshan22 wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 80: Sentence Correction (SC1)


For SC butler Questions Click Here

Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of qualifying for the 1965 Olympics and later worked as stuntman, is also a brilliant mind who is credited as the invention of the wind-up radio.

(A) who is credited as

(B) that credited as

(C) that is credited with

(D) who is credited with

(E) who is credited with having


The best/excellent answers get kudos, which will be awarded after the answer is revealed.
There may be no best/excellent answers, or a there may be a few excellent answers!


In OA(D), isn't the pronoun 'who' too far from the noun TB that it modifies?

Trevor Baylis is also a brilliant mind who is credited with the invention of the wind-up radio.


AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , GMATGuruNY , VeritasPrepBrian , MartyTargetTestPrep , DmitryFarber , VeritasKarishma , generis , other experts - please enlighten
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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2019, 07:16
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Skywalker18 wrote:
In OA(D), isn't the pronoun 'who' too far from the noun TB that it modifies?

Trevor Baylis is also a brilliant mind who is credited with the invention of the wind-up radio.

Debatably, in this case, "mind" is a synonym for "person." If you agree with that interpretation, then the pronoun placement is fine.

Otherwise, yes, the pronoun would be separated by too many sentence elements from what it refer too.

Here's a somewhat similar example:

Jim is an archeologist who studies Native American sites.

In this case, "who" refers to "archeologist," rather than to "Jim."
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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2019, 08:43
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And just to add on a strategic point here...note that if you cut out the big modifying phrase between "Trevor Baylis" and "is" you end up with a pretty short thought:

Trevor Baylis is also a brilliant mind who is credited

Which shows that the sentence is treating "a brilliant mind" as a direct description for Trevor (like "is a mechanic" or "is a swimmer" would be). "Trevor is a brilliant mind" sets "brilliant mind" as almost a synonym for the person (as opposed to "Trevor has a brilliant mind" in which case you couldn't use "who" there at all). Because the stripped down sentence takes that care to define the mind as the person (and not a possession of a person), I'd use that as my justification for "okay I guess who fits as a modifier, because the sentence is telling me to treat it this way."

Where I find HUGE debate with this question...Olympics are always in even-numbered years (and summer Olympic years are always divisible by 4)! There were no 1965 Olympics! (probably a typo for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics)
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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2019, 09:10
VeritasPrepBrian wrote:
And just to add on a strategic point here...note that if you cut out the big modifying phrase between "Trevor Baylis" and "is" you end up with a pretty short thought:

Trevor Baylis is also a brilliant mind who is credited

Which shows that the sentence is treating "a brilliant mind" as a direct description for Trevor (like "is a mechanic" or "is a swimmer" would be). "Trevor is a brilliant mind" sets "brilliant mind" as almost a synonym for the person (as opposed to "Trevor has a brilliant mind" in which case you couldn't use "who" there at all). Because the stripped down sentence takes that care to define the mind as the person (and not a possession of a person), I'd use that as my justification for "okay I guess who fits as a modifier, because the sentence is telling me to treat it this way."

Where I find HUGE debate with this question...Olympics are always in even-numbered years (and summer Olympic years are always divisible by 4)! There were no 1965 Olympics! (probably a typo for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics)



Hello VeritasPrepBrian,

Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of qualifying for the 1965 Olympics and later worked as stuntman, is also a brilliant mind who is credited as the invention of the wind-up radio.

Had a query ...is my line of thought of correct..
If I replace who with Mind..It says... Someone's mind (Trevor's) is credited with the invention of the wind-up radio.I guess its more apt to mention as ..

A person can be credited with the invention...
(again its debatable)
For example,

Einstein's mind is credited with the invention of "Theory of relativity".
vs
Einstein is credited with the invention of "Theory of relativity".
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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2019, 10:00
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The big difference here is that the sentence is treating "a brilliant mind" as the person, not as one of many body parts within that person. By saying that Trevor "is a brilliant mind" they're equating Trevor with "brilliant mind" (as opposed to saying Trevor "has" a brilliant mind, which would make the mind one of his body parts).

A similar example would be "In a recent movie, Matt Damon starred as "The Brain," a scientist who..." Here "The Brain" is the name of a character, so you'd treat that as a person, and therefore the modifier "a scientist" (which can modify a person but not a body part) would be a valid modifier.

NOW...the great thing about GMAC is that it statistically tests all of its questions for cultural bias so if it were a case where people in one area of the world (here in the U.S. I think it's pretty common to see someone called "a brilliant mind" and to know that that term applies to a person, but if you didn't grow up with that euphemism I could see it being tough) get the problem right way more frequently than people elsewhere, they'll flag it and investigate before it would ever affect your score. BUT I'd be leery of depending on that, so the lesson I'd take away here is that that word "is" equates Trevor with "brilliant mind" so it's logical to use "brilliant mind" with modifiers for a person.
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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2019, 06:40
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VeritasPrepBrian wrote:
The big difference here is that the sentence is treating "a brilliant mind" as the person, not as one of many body parts within that person. By saying that Trevor "is a brilliant mind" they're equating Trevor with "brilliant mind" (as opposed to saying Trevor "has" a brilliant mind, which would make the mind one of his body parts).

A similar example would be "In a recent movie, Matt Damon starred as "The Brain," a scientist who..." Here "The Brain" is the name of a character, so you'd treat that as a person, and therefore the modifier "a scientist" (which can modify a person but not a body part) would be a valid modifier.

NOW...the great thing about GMAC is that it statistically tests all of its questions for cultural bias so if it were a case where people in one area of the world (here in the U.S. I think it's pretty common to see someone called "a brilliant mind" and to know that that term applies to a person, but if you didn't grow up with that euphemism I could see it being tough) get the problem right way more frequently than people elsewhere, they'll flag it and investigate before it would ever affect your score. BUT I'd be leery of depending on that, so the lesson I'd take away here is that that word "is" equates Trevor with "brilliant mind" so it's logical to use "brilliant mind" with modifiers for a person.



That's a real deep explanation.Each of your posts is worth learning something from. :)


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Re: Trevor Baylis, an accomplished British swimmer who fell just short of   [#permalink] 07 Feb 2019, 06:40
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