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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:54
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A
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D
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The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

A. need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
B. need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
C. need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
D. need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
E. need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:54
Official Solution:

The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

A. need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
B. need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
C. need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
D. need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
E. need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

The second sentence is incomplete and must corrected by the addition of a comma and appropriate subordinating conjunction.
  1. Except is a subordinating conjunction that makes the sentence after the semicolon incomplete.
  2. Except works properly as a subordinating conjunction here, joining the fact that Ronald has access to most of the resources he will need to the fact that Spanish translations will not be available.
  3. Accept sounds like except, but is not correct.
  4. The phrase certain Spanish translations of books is wordy and unnecessary.
  5. The conjunction but in this option changes the meaning of the sentence, as does the adjusted phrase there are few books in Spanish which he.

Answer: B
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New post 04 Nov 2014, 05:55
Can any expert shed light on the use of the comma "," after the phrase "certain books" in the OA B.
For me, that comma "," is redundant so I chose D.
Thank you!

Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need. Except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

A. need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
B. need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
C. need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
D. need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
E. need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

The second sentence is incomplete and must corrected by the addition of a comma and appropriate subordinating conjunction.
  1. Except is a subordinating conjunction that makes the sentence after the semicolon incomplete.
  2. Except works properly as a subordinating conjunction here, joining the fact that Ronald has access to most of the resources he will need to the fact that Spanish translations will not be available.
  3. Accept sounds like except, but is not correct.
  4. The phrase certain Spanish translations of books is wordy and unnecessary.
  5. The conjunction but in this option changes the meaning of the sentence, as does the adjusted phrase there are few books in Spanish which he.

Answer: B
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New post 22 Feb 2015, 03:35
1
I think this question is good and helpful.
Is not clear whether the first option has a period (in Q) or a semicolon (in 1st answer choice)
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New post 22 Feb 2015, 03:35
I think this question is good and helpful.
Is not clear whether the first option has a period (in Q) or a semicolon (in 1st answer choice)
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New post 11 Oct 2015, 07:01
I think this is a poor-quality question and I agree with explanation. Misprinting in the question itself: with "need. Except" there r basically 2 sentences. A clears the doubt, yet not a good thing.
Thanks.
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New post 14 Oct 2015, 22:19
binit wrote:
I think this is a poor-quality question and I agree with explanation. Misprinting in the question itself: with "need. Except" there r basically 2 sentences. A clears the doubt, yet not a good thing.
Thanks.


Thanks a lot for reporting. I have updated it.
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New post 31 Jan 2016, 11:27
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. Guys, on gmatclub blog you say that the correct answer is D, and here you say that the correct answer is B. Which one is the correct answer afterwards?
FYI: The correct usage of except does not require for, but rather: Exception of or except with.

Take a look please.
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New post 17 Mar 2016, 08:39
Gabrielantonioreis wrote:
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. Guys, on gmatclub blog you say that the correct answer is D, and here you say that the correct answer is B. Which one is the correct answer afterwards?
FYI: The correct usage of except does not require for, but rather: Exception of or except with.

Take a look please.


I agree. I chose D because it correctly uses "Exception of" ... while rest of the choices do not.
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New post 25 Mar 2017, 10:24
D) should be correct.
Semicolon introduces to INDEPENDENT clauses; therefore, both need a subject and working verb.
Only D avoids that construction by introducing a prepositional phrase (No need of S+V)
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New post 02 Apr 2017, 08:30
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melin94 wrote:
D) should be correct.
Semicolon introduces to INDEPENDENT clauses; therefore, both need a subject and working verb.
Only D avoids that construction by introducing a prepositional phrase (No need of S+V)


In option D, "with the exception of " is a wrong idiom - "except for" is more concise and better. Moreover "certain Spanish translations" does not make sense. Thus option D is wrong.

In option B, "except for Spanish translations of certain books..." is not an independent clause, and hence does not require a semicolon before it. "Except" is a preposition and "except for Spanish translations of certain books" is a prepositional phrase used as a verb modifier for the verb "need".

Option B is hence better than option D.
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New post 09 Nov 2017, 20:49
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. In the explanation it says that D is wordy and hence incorrect. Wordy isn't necessarily incorrect. Sometimes it is a matter of personal preference.
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New post 12 Dec 2017, 07:03
I think this is a poor-quality question and I agree with explanation. I thought GMAT did not test for punctuation.
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New post 05 Jan 2018, 18:01
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sayantanc2k wrote:
melin94 wrote:
D) should be correct.
Semicolon introduces to INDEPENDENT clauses; therefore, both need a subject and working verb.
Only D avoids that construction by introducing a prepositional phrase (No need of S+V)


In option D, "with the exception of " is a wrong idiom - "except for" is more concise and better. Moreover "certain Spanish translations" does not make sense. Thus option D is wrong.

In option B, "except for Spanish translations of certain books..." is not an independent clause, and hence does not require a semicolon before it. "Except" is a preposition and "except for Spanish translations of certain books" is a prepositional phrase used as a verb modifier for the verb "need".

Option B is hence better than option D.


Can you please explain why in this post: https://gmatclub.com/forum/mauritius-wa ... 73682.html

the expert states that starting a clause with except makes it independent and thus requires a period or semicolon OR a conjunction like "but" before "except"
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New post 15 Jul 2019, 07:21
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

A. need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
B. need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
C. need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
D. need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
E. need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

The second sentence is incomplete and must corrected by the addition of a comma and appropriate subordinating conjunction.
  1. Except is a subordinating conjunction that makes the sentence after the semicolon incomplete.
  2. Except works properly as a subordinating conjunction here, joining the fact that Ronald has access to most of the resources he will need to the fact that Spanish translations will not be available.
  3. Accept sounds like except, but is not correct.
  4. The phrase certain Spanish translations of books is wordy and unnecessary.
  5. The conjunction but in this option changes the meaning of the sentence, as does the adjusted phrase there are few books in Spanish which he.

Answer: B


The reason why i eliminated B was that i thought the sentence between the two commas is the one which doesn't contribute to the sentence greatly which is not the case over here. Where did i go wrong?
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New post 15 Jul 2019, 09:49
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rajeet1234 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

A. need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
B. need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
C. need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
D. need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
E. need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

The second sentence is incomplete and must corrected by the addition of a comma and appropriate subordinating conjunction.
  1. Except is a subordinating conjunction that makes the sentence after the semicolon incomplete.
  2. Except works properly as a subordinating conjunction here, joining the fact that Ronald has access to most of the resources he will need to the fact that Spanish translations will not be available.
  3. Accept sounds like except, but is not correct.
  4. The phrase certain Spanish translations of books is wordy and unnecessary.
  5. The conjunction but in this option changes the meaning of the sentence, as does the adjusted phrase there are few books in Spanish which he.

Answer: B


The reason why i eliminated B was that i thought the sentence between the two commas is the one which doesn't contribute to the sentence greatly which is not the case over here. Where did i go wrong?

There are situations when the information between two commas is just a modifier, and some people will advise you to "ignore it" under certain circumstances, such as when you're evaluating subject-verb agreement. For example:

    The buffet of African dishes, including ndole and several okra-based stews, is truly breathtaking.

For a moment, you could "ignore" the part between commas, so that it's easier to see that "is" is the correct form of the verb. Fair enough.

But that does NOT mean that you want to ignore things just because they're between commas! That's a terrible habit to get into. Pretty much everything in an GMAT sentence is there for a reason. It might not have a grammatical error, but everything has at least some impact on the meaning of the sentence. So if you think about what the sentence -- in its entirety, without stripping things out -- is actually saying, (B) doesn't look so bad, right?

I hope this helps!
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New post 15 Jul 2019, 09:55
GMATNinja wrote:
rajeet1234 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

A. need; except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
B. need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
C. need, accept for Spanish translations of certain books, which he
D. need, with the exception of certain Spanish translations of books which he
E. need, but there are few books in Spanish which he

The second sentence is incomplete and must corrected by the addition of a comma and appropriate subordinating conjunction.
  1. Except is a subordinating conjunction that makes the sentence after the semicolon incomplete.
  2. Except works properly as a subordinating conjunction here, joining the fact that Ronald has access to most of the resources he will need to the fact that Spanish translations will not be available.
  3. Accept sounds like except, but is not correct.
  4. The phrase certain Spanish translations of books is wordy and unnecessary.
  5. The conjunction but in this option changes the meaning of the sentence, as does the adjusted phrase there are few books in Spanish which he.

Answer: B


The reason why i eliminated B was that i thought the sentence between the two commas is the one which doesn't contribute to the sentence greatly which is not the case over here. Where did i go wrong?

There are situations when the information between two commas is just a modifier, and some people will advise you to "ignore it" under certain circumstances, such as when you're evaluating subject-verb agreement. For example:

    The buffet of African dishes, including ndole and several okra-based stews, is truly breathtaking.

For a moment, you could "ignore" the part between commas, so that it's easier to see that "is" is the correct form of the verb. Fair enough.

But that does NOT mean that you want to ignore things just because they're between commas! That's a terrible habit to get into. Pretty much everything in an GMAT sentence is there for a reason. It might not have a grammatical error, but everything has at least some impact on the meaning of the sentence. So if you think about what the sentence -- in its entirety, without stripping things out -- is actually saying, (B) doesn't look so bad, right?

I hope this helps!


That does help. Thanks a lot :)

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New post 15 Jul 2019, 10:27
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YYZ wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
melin94 wrote:
D) should be correct.
Semicolon introduces to INDEPENDENT clauses; therefore, both need a subject and working verb.
Only D avoids that construction by introducing a prepositional phrase (No need of S+V)


In option D, "with the exception of " is a wrong idiom - "except for" is more concise and better. Moreover "certain Spanish translations" does not make sense. Thus option D is wrong.

In option B, "except for Spanish translations of certain books..." is not an independent clause, and hence does not require a semicolon before it. "Except" is a preposition and "except for Spanish translations of certain books" is a prepositional phrase used as a verb modifier for the verb "need".

Option B is hence better than option D.


Can you please explain why in this post: https://gmatclub.com/forum/mauritius-wa ... 73682.html

the expert states that starting a clause with except makes it independent and thus requires a period or semicolon OR a conjunction like "but" before "except"

The word "except" doesn't automatically create an independent clause. Here's a version of the sentence in the post you linked to:

    Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Check out the part in blue: "except in the domains of administration and teaching" isn't an independent clause, right? It's just a modifier that describes the full, independent clause that follows ("the English language was never really spoken on the island"). The expert that made the post was just saying that the sentence in its current form has two independent clauses, separated only by a comma. But it's not true that "except" automatically creates an independent clause.

I hope this helps a bit!
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New post 18 Jul 2019, 04:25
Hi,
Thanks for the explanation. One follow-up question though.
In the given question plugging in the answer choice the statement will look as follow:
The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

Now if i look at the above statement from the perspective you mentioned. "which he will have to request from a neighboring university" should be an independent clause. Is it the case here? Is not a comma which modifier, clause modifying noun phrase "Spanish translations of certain books".

Please help me resolve this doubt. GMATNinja
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New post 27 Jul 2019, 13:55
ruchik wrote:
Hi,
Thanks for the explanation. One follow-up question though.
In the given question plugging in the answer choice the statement will look as follow:
The university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need, except for Spanish translations of certain books, which he will have to request from a neighboring university.

Now if i look at the above statement from the perspective you mentioned. "which he will have to request from a neighboring university" should be an independent clause. Is it the case here? Is not a comma which modifier, clause modifying noun phrase "Spanish translations of certain books".

Please help me resolve this doubt. GMATNinja

Yes, the which clause ("which he will have to request from a neighboring university") does indeed modify the noun phrase "Spanish translations of certain books"! But, by itself, "which he will have to request from a neighboring university" clearly isn't an independent clause. Even "he will have to request from a neighboring university" wouldn't qualify as a complete thought because it leaves us wondering, "He will have to request what?"

The which clause has a subject (he) and a verb (will have to request), but that doesn't make it an independent clause. The only independent clause in the OA is the first part of the sentence ("the university library offers most of the resources Ronald will need"), and there's no reason why we would have to have another independent clause in the sentence.

I hope this helps!
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