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V02-18 [#permalink]

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Studies of performance reports show that working in a multilingual environment has a markedly positive effect on managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language, as compared to those whose native language is English.

A. to those whose native language is English.
B. with those whose native language is English.
C. with those who are native English speakers.
D. to managers whose colleagues do not.
E. with managers whose colleagues are native English speakers.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:57
Official Solution:

Studies of performance reports show that working in a multilingual environment has a markedly positive effect on managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language, as compared to those whose native language is English.

A. to those whose native language is English.
B. with those whose native language is English.
C. with those who are native English speakers.
D. to managers whose colleagues do not.
E. with managers whose colleagues are native English speakers.

Choice A : Comparisons must compare logically parallel things, but this sentence compares "managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language" with "those (managers) whose native language is English.” (Note that the pronoun "those" refers to managers logically and structurally, because of the parallelism required in a comparison. There is no pronoun error.) Logic tells us that a manager can be in both of these categories: a manager who is a native English speaker can have colleagues who speak English as a second language. Because the first item in the comparison - managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language, is not underlined - we need to find a choice that contains a comparison between two things that are actually comparable (an “apples-to-apples” type of comparison).Important thing to note here is that "compared to" and "compared with" are equivalent idioms from the point of view of the GMAT; either is correct. According to some usage experts, these two idioms differ slightly in their emphasis on similarities vs. differences, but this distinction is not universally respected.
  1. Choice A : We have a comparison in the non-underlined portion of the sentence so the underlined portion should compare the same logical structures. This choice compares "managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language" with "those (managers) whose native language is English.” The managers in the sentence could also have their native language as English
  2. Choice B : This choice also compares "managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language" with "managers whose native language is English."
  3. Choice C : Although this choice replaces “whose native language is English” with the equivalent phrase “who are native,” the choice does not fix the original comparison error. The sentence still compares English speakers “managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language" with “managers who are native English speakers.”
  4. Choice D : The second group is now “managers whose colleagues do not (speak English as a second language).” Do the colleagues in this second group speak English as a native language, then? Or do they not speak English at all? The meaning is ambiguous in this choice, while the meaning in the original sentence is quite clear: we’re comparing those who speak English as a second language to those who speak English as a first language.
  5. Choice E : CORRECT. This choice correctly compares “managers whose colleagues speak English as a second language” with the logically parallel “managers whose colleagues are native English speakers."

Answer: E
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 21 Dec 2014, 02:37
I think this question is poor and not helpful.
I do not agree with the non-underlined info. as compared to....according to e-gmat as compared to is a wrong expression....pls correct me if wrong.
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 10:07
smritee wrote:
I think this question is poor and not helpful.
I do not agree with the non-underlined info. as compared to....according to e-gmat as compared to is a wrong expression....pls correct me if wrong.

The question is right.

Explanation is pretty spot on.
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2015, 04:15
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation.
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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attached, from e-gmat when and what is correct.

the comparison is clear between managers who have employees with E as second language, and managers who have employees whose native language is E.
>> !!!

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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2016, 19:05
I do not see any logic issues with choice E. Yes the reference to "employee speak english as first language" or to "employee who doesn't speak english at all" was not clarified, but in logic it can be irrelevant here, since it could be neither case would have positive effect on managers as having employee speak english as second language do. Maybe communicating with disturbance of accent would have positive effect, which doesn't exist in either of the above cases?

So I think E completes the logic chain, and using the meaning of wrong choice (A) as a anchor point can't be a good reasoning process.
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2016, 23:45
I am not sure if I agree with the e-GMAT concept.

Here is an MGMAT question (scary similar to this one),
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

1. to those who are
2. with children who are
3. with
4. to those whose parents are
5. with children whose parents are

Comparisons require parallelism. In this case, we'd need to compare either:
(1) children who speak English as a second language and children who are native speakers
or
(2) children whose parents speak English as a second language and children whose parents are native speakers

In the original sentence, the first half of the comparison is "children whose parents speak English as a second language." The second half of the comparison needs to be fully parallel to the first half, so when we say "those who are native English speakers," we have two options for "those."

(1) "Those" refers to the main noun in the first half of the comparison: "children." This would make the second half of the comparison "children who are native English speakers." This is problematic because it isn't an apples to apples comparison (we aren't comparing the parents of one group of children to the parents of another group of children).
(2) "Those" refers to the full first half of the comparison: "children whose parents speak English as a second language." This would make the second half of the comparison "children whose parents speak English as a second language who are native English speakers." That doesn't make sense.

So, "those" is problematic either way. Eliminate both A and D. (And, no, changing the "to" to "with" in D will not make D an acceptable answer, because it still contains the problematic "those.")
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2016, 06:43
I do agree. The non underlined portion is unidiomatic.
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2016, 03:33
I went for D as well. Could you please remove the AS compared to? it is not correct.
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2016, 06:14
"as compared to" and " as compared with " are both wrong gramatically.
correct grammar can be " Compared with/to " or " In comparison with/to "
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Re: V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2016, 07:27
shivammahajan wrote:
"as compared to" and "as compared with " are both wrong gramatically.
correct grammar can be " Compared with/to" or "In comparison with/to "


As per Manhattan SC guide, "as compared to/with" is suspect. "Compared to/ with" is definitely right, and " when compared to/ with" is definitely wrong. It is better not to eliminate answers just because of use of "as compared..."; keep it as a last resort to eliminate, when you are unable to decide between two choices.
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Re V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2018, 00:35
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation.
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Re V02-18 [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2018, 10:15
I think this is a high-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. According to various guides and study material from e-gmat, "as" should only be used with "to". That makes (E) a less correct choice.

Also, the first part of the sentence states: "managers whose colleagues speak English". The second part of the sentence should be parallel to it, if at all possible. (D) looks like the suitable choice.
Re V02-18   [#permalink] 08 Apr 2018, 10:15
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