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V05-37

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V05-37 [#permalink]

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Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.

A. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
B. Rather than accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.
C. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent towards the path of complete awareness by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of complete awareness.
D. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
E. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.

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Re V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 02:26
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Official Solution:

Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.

A. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
B. Rather than accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.
C. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent towards the path of complete awareness by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of complete awareness.
D. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
E. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.

  1. This choice begins with "instead of," which is incorrectly used to compare the verbs “accepting” and “went.” When comparing verbs, “rather than” is the better choice.
  2. This choice contains the same errors as in (A). "X rather than Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this choice pairs an active verb ("accepting") with a passive one ("was sent"). Second, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "if" is used only to introduce conditional clauses (e.g. “if X, then Y”). Here, "whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty about acheiving a state of enlightenment.
  3. This choice begins with "instead of," which is incorrectly used to compare the verbs “accepting” and “was sent”. When comparing verbs, “rather than” is the better choice. Even if “instead of” were correct, the construction "X instead of Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this choice pairs an active verb ("accepting") with a passive one ("was sent"). Finally, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "Whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty.
  4. Correct. This choice uses the construction “X rather than Y” to correctly compare the parallel active verbs “accept” and “went.” The uncertainty about acheiving a state of enlightenment is correctly indicated by the word “whether.”
  5. The construction "X rather than Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this answer choice pairs an active verb ("accept") with a passive one ("was sent"). Second, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "if" is used only to introduce conditional clauses (e.g. “if X, then Y”). Here, "whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty about achieving a state of enlightenment. On the GMAT “if” is preferred as a conditional and “whether” to express uncertainty about certain event.

Answer: D
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2015, 00:44
I think this is a high-quality question and the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate. I am sorry but I have to ask :
Parallelism implies same verb tense, correct ?
went = past simple
accept = present perfect

Am I wrong ?
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2015, 22:59
Refer to the sentence :Rather than accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.
As per the explanation ... only one error ( parallelism error is listed.........Rather than X , Y ...., However, in my understanding use of passive voice is also incorrect here....

Kindly clarify ....whether the below sentence is correct ....
Rather than accept the throne of Kapilvastu, lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness .

In my understanding ....use of passive voice here ....Lord Buddha was sent ...... is wrong here...
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2015, 21:25
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. Final answer choice explanation has a misspelling, "weather" instead of "whether."
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2016, 19:25
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2016, 21:18
Bunuel Sir, a very good question.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2016, 08:50
I don't agree with the explanation. It seems Explanation mixes two questions

Option choice B
to indicate uncertainty about reaching India by traveling west.

Option choice D
The uncertainty about reaching India by travelling west is correctly indicated by the word “whether.

No where in the question mentioned about reaching India by travelling west.

Option choice E
“weather” instead of whether.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2016, 11:31
sahilmalhotra01 wrote:
I don't agree with the explanation. It seems Explanation mixes two questions

Option choice B
to indicate uncertainty about reaching India by traveling west.

Option choice D
The uncertainty about reaching India by travelling west is correctly indicated by the word “whether.

No where in the question mentioned about reaching India by travelling west.

Option choice E
“weather” instead of whether.


Corrected. Thank you for pointing out.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2016, 05:52
Hi Bunuel,

While the explanation is overall sound. Isn't the sequence of participle modifier incorrect in option D.
MGmat SC book says that for adverbial participle modifiers- "the information presented earlier in the sentence lead to or results in the information presented later in the sentence"

My question is
1) Is this rule being violated here in the correct answer choice
2) if yes then how does one prioritize and select the correct answer when there are fallacies in the correct answer choice
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2016, 09:25
korhiyatryinghard wrote:
Hi Bunuel,

While the explanation is overall sound. Isn't the sequence of participle modifier incorrect in option D.
MGmat SC book says that for adverbial participle modifiers- "the information presented earlier in the sentence lead to or results in the information presented later in the sentence"

My question is
1) Is this rule being violated here in the correct answer choice
2) if yes then how does one prioritize and select the correct answer when there are fallacies in the correct answer choice


The use of present participle modifier (verb+ing) you mentioned is not the only one - various uses of present participle modifiers are summarized below:

Usage 1:
The crime in the region decreased, attracting many real-estate investors. (The present participle modifier refers to the whole clause - it depicts the result of the whole clause - the type of usage you mentioned)

Usage 2:
Steffi won Wimbledon, defeating Sabatini in straight sets. (The present participle modifier refers to the subject of the previous clause Steffi - moreover note that defeat is NOT the result of the win, rather the sequence is the other way round - the type of usage in option D here)

Usage 3:
The present participle modifier may also act as any other modifier, i.e. modifying the noun it touches:
...trained several actors including Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro. (The present participle modifier modifies the noun actors)
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Re V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2016, 11:52
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. "Having been" is not a GMAT acceptable use and it is used in the correct answer choice here. It invites immediate elimination.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2016, 01:47
rkhdby wrote:
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. "Having been" is not a GMAT acceptable use and it is used in the correct answer choice here. It invites immediate elimination.


I have not come across any official instruction or guideline that states that "having been" is not an acceptable use. I do not see a problem in option D - the perfect participle in passive voice has been correctly used.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2016, 00:13
can anybody explain me the use having been?
e-gmat@e-gmat can u please see this question? :roll: :|
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2016, 12:55
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Karanagrawal wrote:
can anybody explain me the use having been?
e-gmat@e-gmat can u please see this question? :roll: :|


First it is required to understand the use of perfect participle - A perfect particle has the following structure:
having + past participle
e.g., having said, having eaten, having done etc.
The perfect participle is used to indicate that an action has been completed.

Having eaten my breakfast, I left for school.
Having done the homework, John went out to play.

Note that all the above usages are in active voice, i.e. the subject performed the actions themselves. (I ate my breakfast, John did the homework).

Now consider the following:
The messenger was ordered by the king (passive) - then the messenger left the palace.

The perfect participle form of "was ordered" is "having been ordered".
Having been ordered by the king, the messenger left the palace. ( The messenger himself did not order - he was ordered by the king: passive.)

Some more perfect participle in passive are:
having been seen, having been hit etc.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2017, 01:20
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Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.

A. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
B. Rather than accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.
C. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent towards the path of complete awareness by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of complete awareness.
D. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
E. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.

  1. This choice begins with "instead of," which is incorrectly used to compare the verbs “accepting” and “went.” When comparing verbs, “rather than” is the better choice.
  2. This choice contains the same errors as in (A). "X rather than Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this choice pairs an active verb ("accepting") with a passive one ("was sent"). Second, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "if" is used only to introduce conditional clauses (e.g. “if X, then Y”). Here, "whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty about acheiving a state of enlightenment.
  3. This choice begins with "instead of," which is incorrectly used to compare the verbs “accepting” and “was sent”. When comparing verbs, “rather than” is the better choice. Even if “instead of” were correct, the construction "X instead of Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this choice pairs an active verb ("accepting") with a passive one ("was sent"). Finally, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "Whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty.
  4. Correct. This choice uses the construction “X rather than Y” to correctly compare the parallel active verbs “accept” and “went.” The uncertainty about acheiving a state of enlightenment is correctly indicated by the word “whether.”
  5. The construction "X rather than Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this answer choice pairs an active verb ("accept") with a passive one ("was sent"). Second, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "if" is used only to introduce conditional clauses (e.g. “if X, then Y”). Here, "whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty about achieving a state of enlightenment. On the GMAT “if” is preferred as a conditional and “whether” to express uncertainty about certain event.

Answer: D





isn't rather than accept wrong as it should be rather than accepting.

for example:

rather than eating at home he went to the restraunt to eat.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2017, 09:29
smanujahrc wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.

A. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
B. Rather than accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.
C. Instead of accepting the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent towards the path of complete awareness by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of complete awareness.
D. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha went towards the path of complete awareness to see whether he could achieve a state of enlightenment, having been sent by his inner instincts.
E. Rather than accept the throne of Kapilavastu, Lord Buddha was sent by his inner instincts to see if he could achieve a state of enlightenment by going towards the path of complete awareness.

  1. This choice begins with "instead of," which is incorrectly used to compare the verbs “accepting” and “went.” When comparing verbs, “rather than” is the better choice.
  2. This choice contains the same errors as in (A). "X rather than Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this choice pairs an active verb ("accepting") with a passive one ("was sent"). Second, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "if" is used only to introduce conditional clauses (e.g. “if X, then Y”). Here, "whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty about acheiving a state of enlightenment.
  3. This choice begins with "instead of," which is incorrectly used to compare the verbs “accepting” and “was sent”. When comparing verbs, “rather than” is the better choice. Even if “instead of” were correct, the construction "X instead of Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this choice pairs an active verb ("accepting") with a passive one ("was sent"). Finally, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "Whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty.
  4. Correct. This choice uses the construction “X rather than Y” to correctly compare the parallel active verbs “accept” and “went.” The uncertainty about acheiving a state of enlightenment is correctly indicated by the word “whether.”
  5. The construction "X rather than Y" requires parallelism between X and Y, but this answer choice pairs an active verb ("accept") with a passive one ("was sent"). Second, the use of "if" in this context is incorrect. "if" is used only to introduce conditional clauses (e.g. “if X, then Y”). Here, "whether" should be used instead of “if” to indicate uncertainty about achieving a state of enlightenment. On the GMAT “if” is preferred as a conditional and “whether” to express uncertainty about certain event.

Answer: D





isn't rather than accept wrong as it should be rather than accepting.

for example:

rather than eating at home he went to the restraunt to eat.


The sentence you mentioned is wrong - "eating" is a gerund, whereas "went" is a verb. They cannot be used in parallel. The correct sentence could be:

Rather than eat at home he went to the restaurant to eat. (verb parallel to verb)
OR
Going to restaurant rather than eating at home is preferred. (gerund parallel to gerund)
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2017, 03:37
Even though this does not make incorrect options correct, I am pretty sure that I read in Manhattan Prep's SC guide that we can have Active and Passive voices Parallel in a sentence. I can look in the book if mods are absolutely sure that I am wrong.

Besides this, there is an Unintentional Rrror in C. The Last Word in this option should be Enlightenment. The expressions are - path of complete awareness AND state of enlightenment.
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2017, 15:00
" having been sent by his inner instincts. "

Can someone please explain what part of the sentence the above phrase is modifying ??
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Re: V05-37 [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2018, 05:50
The whole frame of reference is past, lord buddha went then how can we use having been,
does not having been changes the reference to present?

Also instead is used in the place of, and rather than is a choice.
Can anyone please let me know whether to use always rather if there is any verb?
Re: V05-37   [#permalink] 19 Jan 2018, 05:50
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