It is currently 12 Dec 2017, 09:18

Happening Now:

Live Chat with Cornell Johnson Adcoms and Students. Join HERE  |  HBS R1 Decision Chat


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Vanderbilt MBA Admissions and Related Blogs

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Workforce 2025: A Conversation with P&G’s Rich Postler [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Sep 2017, 13:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Workforce 2025: A Conversation with P&G’s Rich Postler
Vanderbilt Business recently welcomed Rich Postler, Vice President of HR for Global Business Services and Global Information Technology at Procter & Gamble, to Owen as part of the school’s Leadership-in-Residence program. He sat down with Dean Johnson to discuss what the workforce will look like in 2025, and the skills that leaders and employees will need to thrive.

 

The post Workforce 2025: A Conversation with P&G’s Rich Postler appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Large Pay Disparities Can be Regarded as Fair, With Proper Motivationa [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Sep 2017, 13:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Large Pay Disparities Can be Regarded as Fair, With Proper Motivational Orientation
When employees are guided by the pursuit of gains and advancement, they can view pay disparities as fair, according to new research by Tae-Youn Park of Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management.

Image
Ty Park

According to a paper recently published in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, a large pay dispersion (i.e., wide pay variances among employees) can increase perceptions of pay fairness when employees have a strong promotion regulatory focus.

Regulatory Focus Theory (RFT), formulated by Columbia University’s Tory Higgins, posits that people tend to be motivated to pursue goals in one of two ways: 1) to achieve an ideal state (promotion-focused), or 2) to achieve safety and security (prevention-focused). Each focus comes with advantages and disadvantages, and people’s orientations depend on circumstances.

Professor Park and his co-authors, Seongsu Kim and Li-Kuo Sung, harnessed RFT to theorize that pay dispersion would increase or decrease perceptions of pay fairness when employees have strong promotion or prevention foci, respectively.

The academic discussion regarding pay spreads often turns to the “equity norm,“ which proposes that any levels of pay disparity are fair as long as they reflect how contribution levels differ among employees. According to Park, the problem with this line of thinking is that employee contributions can hardly be measured using objective metrics alone, and some degree of subjective judgment (e.g., helping) is necessary. Due to this subjectivity of performance, each employee tends to have different perceptions about their own and others’ contributions. For this reason, Park and his co-authors argue that the discussion on pay disparity should be extended by acknowledging social psychological factors, such as regulatory foci, that influence people’s focus in construing pay dispersion.

Park and his co-authors conducted two large-scale data sets from multiple teams in Korean and Taiwanese organizations. Study 1 included 827 employees at 42 Korean organizations, while Study 2 comprised 186 employees at 5 high-tech organizations in Taiwan. Researchers issued surveys to each group measuring pay dispersion at their respective companies, personal regulatory focus, and perception of pay fairness. In both data sets, they found that people’s pay fairness perceptions increase as the pay dispersion increases, but only when they are promotion-focused. The role of prevention focus on the pay dispersion effect on fairness perception was not as strong as they expected.

Companies with wide pay differentials could emphasize and provide opportunities for employees to achieve, in order to increase promotion focus among the workforce.

“We present an alternative perspective to the pay dispersion literature by showing that pay dispersion positively affects employee pay fairness perceptions, above and beyond the effect of pay-for-performance,” the authors wrote.

To date, researchers usually discuss pay fairness in the context of pay dispersion, but Park’s study introduces a new line of thinking – employees can view a co-worker’s larger salary as a future wage to which they can aspire and work towards. The key to such a viewpoint is the nature of one’s motivational orientation (i.e. regulatory focus).

Practically speaking, the authors note that promotion- or prevention-focused messages about pay disparity could be beneficial for organizations. Companies with wide pay differentials could emphasize and provide opportunities for employees to achieve, in order to increase promotion focus among the workforce. Increasing employees’ perceptions of control over their pursuit of higher pay could also increase notions of pay fairness. When pay scales are tighter, emphasizing safety and security can steer employees toward a prevention mindset.

Park and his co-authors caution that their findings are more suggestive than confirming, but they emphasize the need for additional research. “It is an open question as to how strong a mediating role pay fairness perception plays when pay dispersion influences behavioral outcomes (like job performance),” they write. “More research into the role of pay fairness perceptions in pay dispersion effects may extend the literature further.”

The post Large Pay Disparities Can be Regarded as Fair, With Proper Motivational Orientation appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

MSF Essentials 2018 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Sep 2017, 14:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: MSF Essentials 2018
The post MSF Essentials 2018 appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

P&G HR Vice President Serves as First Leader-in-Residence of the Year [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2017, 14:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: P&G HR Vice President Serves as First Leader-in-Residence of the Year
What if students could sit down for one-on-one, casual conversations with executives from top companies? Twice a year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) at Owen makes this a reality with its Leader-in-Residence (LiR) program, which brings an executive from a major company to campus for several days of immersive conversations.

Earlier this month, the second LiR in the program’s history came to Owen to discuss change management and the evolving workforce: Rich Postler, Vice President of HR for Global Business Services and Global Information Technology from Procter & Gamble.

Over the course of the two-day program, students engage in 20-minute, one-on-one meetings with the Leader-in-Residence (LiR), in addition to larger group discussions over meals and meetings with handfuls of students.

LiR group activities are deliberately capped around 15 students to encourage conversation and create a more collaborative atmosphere. With no LDP staff members in attendance during events, the Leader and the students feel completely free to have candid discussions about business topics.

I think the idea (of the Leader-in-Residence program) is brilliant. I like the personalization for the students.

Throughout his two days at Owen, Postler emphasized that he was here to help the students, and looked to them to guide the one-on-one conversations and the group discussions. “I think the idea (of the Leader-in-Residence program) is brilliant. I like the personalization for the students,” he said.

Postler let students set the tone for his discussions. Instead of asking him about P&G specifically, he noted that many wanted to discuss larger trends in HR or get his feedback on their career plans.

His lunch and dinner discussions on Thursday also focused on these larger trends in HR. At lunch, he shared his top-12 tips for managing and leading change while students munched on catered sandwiches. “I’m not trying to give you soft stuff,” he told attendees. “These are business strategies in my view.”

That night, Postler looked to the future with a discussion about shaping the workforce in 2025, trying to forecast the impact of trends such as remote work. Over dinner, Postler turned the questions back to students, asking them where they believe HR is headed and writing down their ideas.

“Can you guys help me be smarter? How will you anticipate the changes?” he asked.

While the Leader-in-Residence schedule is demanding, Postler says the program provides a “point of differentiation” when it comes to recruiting, helping students and companies get to know each other.

As for future visiting Leaders, Postler says that they need to be prepared to talk with students from diverse backgrounds about a range of topics — for example, he met with both a former ballet dancer and a former civil engineer. He also urges Leaders to set aside the two days to completely engage with students.

“You have to be fully present,” he said, noting that he hadn’t pulled out his phone once during any of his meetings. “It’s not about me, it’s all about (the students).”

Dean M. Eric Johnson talked with Postler for the latest episode of the “This is Vanderbilt Business” podcast. Listen below:

The post P&G HR Vice President Serves as First Leader-in-Residence of the Year appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 27 Sep 2017
Posts: 6

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Vanderbilt MBA Admissions and Related Blogs [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2017, 23:44
I am delighted with Kimberly Pace!

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Research finds large pay disparities can be regarded as fair, with pro [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2017, 06:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Research finds large pay disparities can be regarded as fair, with proper motivational orientation
The post Research finds large pay disparities can be regarded as fair, with proper motivational orientation appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Going for the (Black and) Gold: The Student-Athletes of Vanderbilt Bus [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2017, 11:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Going for the (Black and) Gold: The Student-Athletes of Vanderbilt Business
Balancing school and college athletics is no mean feat, but every year, multiple Commodores take it to the next level and enroll in Owen. The student-athletes at Owen are building foundations for the next step in their careers, whether it’s turning pro in business or sports. We talked with six current and former student-athletes to get their stories.

Image
Scott Sypniewski

  • Sport: Football
  • Position: Long snapper
  • Owen degree: MMark’18 (current)
  • Played while at Owen: Yes
  • Post-grad plans: The NFL (hopefully)
After spending four years at Michigan (and graduating with a bachelor’s degree in English), Sypniewski decided he was ready for a change of scenery. He looked for one-year graduate programs at Division I schools where he could play football for his final year of eligibility, and the Master of Marketing proved to be the perfect fit for his interest in sales and marketing.

On finding a new football program: “It was like cold calling, so that’s why I go back to sales, because I was kind of selling myself to another program to have them bring me in. I probably called every Division I college in the country…probably 2% of the people I called answered the phone.”

Balancing football and business school: “There’s something that Coach (Derek) Mason always says: Be where your feet are. Right now, I’m at school, so football is out of my mind…once I enter the football building, I have to leave school behind. I can’t be walking on the field thinking about my stats final that I have, because then I would lose focus of what I have to do at practice.”

Advice to fellow student-athletes: “I thought (business school) would be impossible. There’s no way I can do a graduate program and play football. It’s too much work…(but) don’t be daunted. Grad school is a thing athletes can do…don’t shy away from it just because your athletic schedule is so demanding.”

Image

Sarah Bell

  • Sport: Track & Field
  • Position: Pole vaulter
  • Owen degree: MMark’18 (current)
  • Played while at Owen: Yes
  • Post-grad plans: Unsure
Bell didn’t originally plan on getting a graduate degree, but after an injury sidelined her during her sophomore season, she found herself with an extra year of eligibility — which led her to apply to Owen’s Master of Marketing program. Bell has been pole vaulting for more than a decade; she holds the school all-time record in the pole vault. She may continue to compete after graduating, but she’s also considering pursuing her passion for marketing.

Figuring out her fifth year: “I love Nashville, I love Vanderbilt itself as a school. I love my team and my coaches. If I didn’t get into (Owen), I probably wasn’t going to use my fifth year…but it all worked out perfectly, and I feel very fortunate about that.”

Making sacrifices for your sport: “You have three areas of your life pulling at you: you have school, you have athletics, and you have social. At some point, you have to give and take and sacrifice some things, (usually social activities). You can’t put a little in each or else you won’t get anywhere.”

Possible future plans: “I knew I wanted to learn more about marketing and management and the business side, because I came in with a Medicine, Health, and Society major…Graduating, I have the idea to marry the two and do medical device sales or pharmaceutical sales…I’m keeping my options open, but that was my intent coming in here.”

Image
Wade Freebeck

  • Sport: Football
  • Position: Quarterback
  • Owen degree: MSF’18 (current)
  • Played while at Owen: No
  • Post-grad plans: Investment banking
Wade Freebeck’s original plan was to redshirt his freshman year on the football team, giving him five years to prepare to go pro (and potentially get his MBA). However, the team burned his redshirt halfway through a losing season, accelerating Freebeck’s timeline both athletically and academically. After three years of play, Freebeck opted not to return for a final season, instead focusing his energies on getting his Master of Science in Finance and launching his new career in investment banking.

Switching focus from sports to school: “Over time, I shifted my focus from (football) to preparing myself for a post-football career in the professional world…That was the reason I came to Vanderbilt in the first place, to be at a place where I could get the best education and set myself up for the future, whether it was football or not.”

Transitioning from economics to finance: “I did econ undergrad here…it was a smooth transition into finance, and that was always kind of the goal, was using (econ) as a springboard into business or finance. I’ve always been interested in the business side of things…I (also) explored internship opportunities in the financial field here in Nashville.”

Competitive nature of business school: “I kind of miss the competitive nature of athletics and the daily challenge that entails. But through Owen, I have found an outlet to pour my focus and effort into, so it’s been a nice transition (that) keeps me busy and provides a challenge for me to wake up and go after every day.”

Image

Nicole Powell

  • Sport: Bowling
  • Owen degree: MAcc’18 (current)
  • Played while at Owen: No
  • Post-grad plans: Auditor
Powell never truly considered the professional bowling route; she actually began thinking about graduate school during her freshman year. That’s when she met Emily Anderson, Director of the Career Management Center, at a student-athlete career fair. After talking with Anderson, Powell was immediately sold on the Master of Accounting program, a passion that was only confirmed through her accounting classes. Powell looks forward to starting work with one of the Big 4 firms after she graduates.

Difficulties of professional bowling: “Unlike most sports, the professional bowling tour is not very big. There’s not a lot of money in it…It’s not what (players) rely on for income…There are maybe three or four women who could survive just on bowling alone, but it’s hard.”

Focusing on accounting: “I’m very career driven, and I’ve always been that way, which is why I started thinking about it my freshman year…(I knew) that I didn’t have the talent it would ever take to go professional. But I knew that I had the talent and really good opportunities with being at Vanderbilt to progress my career by getting into business school.”

Reasons for choosing Owen: “This program is perfect because it’s only one year and the job placement rate is extremely high. You become CPA-certified, which is a big deal for accountants and a big jump in the pay grade too…(Plus) I feel like I’m becoming more and more clear on who I am every day from being at Owen.”

Image

Shelby Moats

  • Sport: Basketball
  • Position: Forward
  • Owen degree: MSF’15 (alum)
  • Played while at Owen: Yes
  • Post-grad plans: Private equity
Upon entering college, Moats planned to play basketball professionally in Europe after graduation. However, as his collegiate career progressed, he realized the pro route probably wasn’t going to happen — and he discovered a newfound passion for finance during an academic summer trip to London. Moats finished his undergraduate degree in economics in three years, using his fourth year on the basketball team to pursue a Master of Science in Finance. After graduating, he worked in investment banking for a couple of years, recently taking a new position at the private equity firm Pritzker Group.

Realizing he wouldn’t play professionally: “When I went to Vanderbilt, I was on scholarship and I was trying to play on TV at 18 years old. That was my thought process. I thought that was what I wanted to do…(but) by the end of my run in college, I knew that I was going to be in business and not play basketball. I think that the coaches had a pretty good grasp on that, and they also were pushing the whole student-athlete thing, with student being first.”

How the MSF program launched his career: “I thought a Masters in Finance would be a good opportunity, because other undergrads might have an internship but I’d have an extra degree…The finance program is definitely intense, but it was totally worth it. At that point, I become very focused on the next step, on life after college…I wouldn’t be where I am today without the Owen degree.”

Thinking about your post-sport career: “There’s so many kids that are sold this dream that the next step is to continue to play basketball, and so it’s hard to tell them to (think about other career paths) because they’re so focused on getting to the next level. Two percent of kids from Division I get drafted. You have a much better chance of getting into business. If you can focus early and understand there is life after basketball, it can be hugely important.”

Image

Andrew East

  • Sport: Football
  • Position: Long snapper
  • Owen degree: MBA’15
  • Played while at Owen: Yes (alum)
  • Post-grad plans: NFL free agent
East used to be the starting long snapper for the Commodores, but he’s perhaps best known as the husband of Shawn Johnson, the former Olympic gymnast (not to mention gold medalist). In addition to helping Johnson with her personal brand and social media marketing, East has also played for multiple NFL teams; he’s currently a free agent. East earned his MBA from Owen while playing on the Commodore football squad and wrapping up his undergraduate degree in civil engineering. He says the skills he learned at Owen have applied to both his time in the NFL and his marketing work with Johnson.

Translating business school to the NFL: “I loved business school. I loved the two years I was there. The material was so engaging…Obviously, the finance classes aren’t really going to kick in, but the understanding that you get of how to manage and interact with people at a professional level has definitely help me in the NFL locker room, learning how to communicate and relate to different guys.”

Student-athlete advantages: “It’s a little intimidating when you’re dealing with these elite students (at business school). Maybe you don’t have the GPA or the test scores that they do, but you have intangibles that you can bring to the table that really do provide a lot of value.”

The Owen fan base: “My classmates were so understanding of my situation, and they were also the biggest football fans. Even the people who didn’t care about football would show up to the games because they wanted to support me…It’s really inspired me to do the same for other people and really go out of my way to support them.”

The post Going for the (Black and) Gold: The Student-Athletes of Vanderbilt Business appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Career Insider Follow-Up: Operations and General Management (Podcast) [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Oct 2017, 06:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Career Insider Follow-Up: Operations and General Management (Podcast)
 

This is Vanderbilt Business takes a second look at the operations and general management career tracks. Ben Rasmus (Land O’ Lakes, operations intern) and Yashar Pirasteh (T-Mobile, Leaders-to-Executives Intern) talk about their summer experiences and what they learned about their roles, companies, and career aspirations.

The post Career Insider Follow-Up: Operations and General Management (Podcast) appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Meet the Vanderbilt Business MBA Class of 2019 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Oct 2017, 14:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Meet the Vanderbilt Business MBA Class of 2019
They are brand managers and band members. Account reps and Army Rangers. Engineers and entrepreneurs. The Vanderbilt MBA Class of 2019 arrived at Management Hall last month with a variety of stories to tell. Over the next two years, they’ll work beside each other to write the next chapters in their careers.

For more information on Owen’s newest MBAs, read the class snapshot below and visit our programs page to learn more.

Class Size: 172

Average Age: 28

Age Range: 23-47

Average GPA: 3.31

Average GMAT: 690

Female (% of class):
26

Minorities (as a % of US Citizens):
11

International Students (% of class):
18

Military (% of class): 11

Mean years of work experience:
5.2



Visit the MBA program page to learn more about the class of 2019.

The post Meet the Vanderbilt Business MBA Class of 2019 appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Sparking Student Entrepreneurs’ Ideas with the FireStarter Program [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Sparking Student Entrepreneurs’ Ideas with the FireStarter Program
It almost sounds like an open mic night at a coffee shop: once a month, Owen students gather in a classroom to try out new material. But students aren’t testing jokes or reading poetry — instead, they’re pitching business ideas.

A fixture of Owen programming for more than a decade, the FireStarter sessions provide a low-pressure environment where students can pitch their early stage startup ideas. Students walk through their concept for five minutes, followed by another five minutes of Q&A. Judges from the Nashville entrepreneur community provide feedback during and after each session.

“We started it because we wanted students to be able to talk about their business ideas and get feedback from experienced entrepreneurs,” said Germain Boer, Professor of Accounting and Emeritus Advisor of the Owen Entrepreneurship Center. “I tell students all the time, ‘try to start a company while you’re here. You’re going to learn so much that’s going to be useful to you.’”

At the September FireStarter, the judges were: Mike Saint (EMBA’98), CEO and founder of Anquiro LLC; Rich May (EMBA’87), investing partner and adviser to M Street Entertainment; Robert Craig, SVP of operations at A+ Storage; Jeff Mandrell, owner of Integrated Control Systems, Inc.; and Kristen Chapman Gibbons, social media strategist and storyteller.

Each month, the judges select a winner, who receives a nominal gift card of $500. However, the real value comes from getting feedback early in the startup process, before students have invested too much time and energy into the idea.

“You shouldn’t be showing up for the money, you should be showing up for the feedback,” counsels Mike Bryant, MBA’12 and Director of the Center for Entrepreneurship.

You shouldn’t be showing up for the money, you should be showing up for the feedback. -Mike Bryant

Participants second this advice. Cameron Huddleston (MBA’18) — who split the September prize with another student, Matt Pringle — says that students should welcome the judges’ fresh opinions. Huddleston’s concept, Avail, is a housing exchange platform that will let graduate students rent directly from other graduate students during summer internships. Huddleston and his team, Mike Woodnorth (MBA’18) and Mike Splittorf (MBA’19), are working to launch the website in January.

Judges told Huddleston that he should talk more about competitor Airbnb and its shortcomings, so he moved that section towards the beginning of his pitch. They also recommended a more in-depth explanation of the costs to scale past the first year, and Huddleston plans to discuss his estimates more thoroughly in future presentations.

“It’s good to (pitch) in front of people who have no idea what you’re talking about to make sure that your story tracks and makes sense,” he said.

Matt Pringle (MBA’19) agrees. He’s currently trying to find co-founders for his idea, an education technology platform that seeks to improve learning outcomes and memory retention for coding and computer programming lessons.

No judges at the last FireStarter had a technology background, so they gave Pringle their perspectives as non-technical listeners. They also recommended that he further explain his customer retention rates during his next presentation.

“In FireStarter, it’s a fresh crowd. They don’t know the assumptions you have been working with,” he said. “So if you forget to say something, or you don’t say something quite right, you don’t have the benefit of the doubt.”

Pringle was actually hesitant to sign for the September event, believing that his idea wasn’t ready to pitch. However, after talking with a few second-years MBAs, he realized that the whole point of FireStarter is to test out startup ideas in the earliest stages and return with a new iteration the next time. Right now, he’s signed up for every Firestarter in 2017.

“The worst thing that can happen is that people won’t understand your idea, or they’ll tell you it’s bad for a number of different reasons. If you truly want to start a company, you need to be able to hear that and adapt,” he said. “If you just embrace (the feedback), it can only help you go farther.”

Image
Matt Pringle presents his education technology platform concept at FireStarter

On the other hand, Huddleston signed up for every campus pitch opportunity he could as soon as school started; he’s also about to embark on a two-week road trip to present Avail at various MBA and law programs in the region. But the September FireStarter was the first chance he had to present his startup outside the classroom this year, and that’s exactly what the sessions are intended to be.

“Sign up and get up there and talk for a couple minutes, and you’ll get feedback and ideas that will help you to prep for the next time you’re going to talk about it,” he said.

Whether it’s their first FireStarter or their fiftieth, students are encouraged to pitch their idea as early in the process as possible — and then keep coming back each month with a new iteration for even more feedback.

“There’s a quote in the entrepreneur world that goes ‘If you’re not embarrassed about your product when you launch it, then you waited too long,’” Bryant said. “(At the end), you’re going to be pretty far ahead of where you were before those 10 minutes.”

Upcoming FireStarter sessions will be held on October 25 and November 14 from 5:30-7:00 p.m. in Room 230. Owen students interested in pitched their ideas can sign up here.

The post Sparking Student Entrepreneurs’ Ideas with the FireStarter Program appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

From the Service to School: Veterans and the MBA Transition [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: From the Service to School: Veterans and the MBA Transition
On August 1, Reed Hayes (MBA’19) signed out of the military — and came directly to the first day of quant foundations boot camp at Owen. After a long stint in the Army, including three-and-a-half years in the Special Forces (a.k.a. Green Berets), Hayes and his family decided the constant training and deployments weren’t sustainable moving forward.

Hayes considered moving straight into the workforce, but he decided that business school was the best way to launch his post-military career. He plans to go into operations, focusing on distribution, logistics, and project management.

“I went on a couple job interviews, but I didn’t really know how to sell myself, and I didn’t really feel like I had marketable skills at the time,” he said.

Image
Reed Hayes poses with his underwater infiltration team

Why Business School?

Not all veterans start business school the same day they leave the military — some use military contract positions as a stepping stone. After serving as a Cryptologic Linguist in the Air Force for six years, Chris Salas (MBA’18) became a Senior Arabic linguist for several contractors around D.C. While he enjoyed putting his foreign languages skills to use, after almost 15 years of studying or working in Arabic, he was ready for a change.

“(I asked myself) ‘What would give me the ability to make myself more marketable?’ And business school just really stood out as the prime option for me,” he said.

Image
Spencer Betts

Many veterans enroll at Owen to gain those marketable skills, even if they already have civilian work experience. After spending four-and-a-half years in the Navy (which included a round-the-world tour), Spencer Betts (MBA’19) found a job at an online lending startup, where he worked for about three years.

Betts started applying to business schools just as the startup began to take off. Friends and family wondered if he should stay with the company. Betts reasoned that it might take him five to 10 years to gain the necessary general business knowledge if he kept working full-time, or he could learn it all in two concentrated years at business school.

Most veterans leave the military in their early or mid 30s, adding to the appeal of business school’s accelerated timeline. “You can get to the same place (either way)…I’d rather frontload it,” he said. “I’ll be starting a career when I’m 35. That’s a little different.”

Image
Fitzgibbons plays with a military service dog during her Afghanistan deployment

Stacey Fitzgibbons, a mechanical engineer at Harvard and a National Guard member (a commitment that included an 11-month deployment in Afghanistan), describes business school as a “crash course” in life after the military.

“You’re introduced to so many different people that you get the experience it would probably take years to get otherwise if you just went into the civilian world,” she said.

Why Owen?

Admissions staff are highly involved in the process for every Owen applicant. Military veterans require special considerations, especially if they’re training or deployed during the application process.

Fitzgibbons had to go off the grid for an entire month — no internet or cell phone access — for military training while she waited to hear back on her business school applications. She notified each school about her absence, and received form replies from every school, except one.

“Then I got (an email) from Vanderbilt, and it was like ‘Stacey, that is so awesome. We support you entirely. Congratulations on this opportunity,’ and (the admissions staff) signed it with their names,” she recalled. “I was like, ‘That school! Forget everyone else!’”

Christie St. John, Director of Admissions for the MBA Program, acts as the point person for veteran applicants. She works with the Armed Forces club to pair interested applicants with current veteran students who can answer the prospective’s questions directly.

“Christie called me personally to tell me I was accepted into Owen. Little gestures like that really made a big impact on me,” said Jon Cobb (MBA’18), President of the Armed Forces club. “She is one of the reasons why Owen is such a veteran-friendly community.”

That level of support makes Owen a frequent top pick for prospective military students — and even if it’s not their first choice from the beginning, the personal touch can change their minds.

“I was looking at other schools to see if any of them could top Vanderbilt, but none of them did. As soon as I got into Vanderbilt, I immediately accepted,” said Jeff Lenar (MBA’19), who came directly to Owen after seven years in the Marines. “You could have given me acceptance letters to any number of top MBA programs, and I still would have picked Owen.”

Image
The Armed Forces Club attends Nashville Sounds Family Day

Campus Resources

Once veterans are enrolled at Owen, the Armed Forces club works with them to ensure the transition to business school goes smoothly. The club offers recruiting support alongside the Career Management Center, such as military-specific resume reviews. They also host social and volunteer events for student veterans throughout the school year.

“I was moved by how many people helped me, and I wanted to give back (by leading the Armed Forces club),” Cobb said. “We’re in a position to help veterans find out what they want to do with their lives and to help them succeed. That’s something I’m really excited about.”

Beyond official social events, veterans recommend connecting with each other informally, since they can draw upon a shared background that civilian students don’t have.

“Veterans need to link up with another veteran here,” Hayes said. “You’re going to walk out of a finance quiz at some point and (ask) ‘What the heck just happened?’ And your fellow veteran is going to say, ‘This is like the first day of Ranger School.’”

Transitioning to Business School

While getting an MBA is the right choice for many veterans, the transition to business school world can be tough. The first step is coming to terms with the academic workload, as many veterans have been out of school for years.

Image
Jeff Lenar enjoys the Marine Corps Birthday Ball

“I was working crazy hours doing something that I knew very well (in the Marines), and now I’m working crazy hours doing something that I don’t know very well,” Lenar said. “There’s this preconceived notion that they’re going to get out of the military and it’s going to be relaxing…(The work) is very quantitative and academic heavy, and (prospective students) really need to be aware of that.”

Veterans do value the competitive nature of business school, and appreciate that their peers are pushing themselves to excel academically.

“That’s what I like about people at business school: They will persevere, they will keep going through…instead of (saying) ‘Oh, this isn’t my subject,’” Betts said.

However, veterans can also have a different perspective on classwork, because they’re used to working under such extreme stress. While this calm demeanor can help them perform well under stress, it can also make it difficult to relate to non-military students at times.

“Business school has to be such a bubble. It’s such a great learning opportunity, but…it’s kind of hard to see people get so worked up over things like grades and finals…no one’s dying,” Fitzgibbons admitted.

“We all are working very hard and want to get A’s…Our perspective (as veterans) helps us to realize that we’re not in a war zone, nobody’s shooting at us, it’s just a stats exam,” Hayes adds.

Image
Jon Cobb

The complications from that perspective extend to the business school environment at large. Many veterans joined the military in order to help others, and some worry that business school is too focused on making a profit or securing the highest salary. However, the veterans at Owen say they can continue helping others and making a difference in their post-military careers, and encourage other veterans to keep an open mind to the possibilities.

“A lot of veterans worry about having a meaningful impact on the world as an MBA, but there are incredible opportunities at Owen to do just that,” Cobb said. “Getting an MBA has helped me meet inspiring people and gain the skills I need to lead positive change on a large scale.”

A lot of veterans worry about having a meaningful impact on the world as an MBA, but there are incredible opportunities at Owen to do just that. -Jon Cobb

Recruiting as Veterans

Most veterans are, by circumstance, career switchers, using business school as a transition time from the military to the civilian world. Vets at Owen are seeking work in diverse industries, including investment banking, health care, consulting, and engineering.

Even though they’re no longer active duty, some seek to unite their interests in business and the military while at school. First-year MBA Hayes is already working part-time at Bunker Labs, a non-profit incubator that helps military veteran entrepreneurs launch their companies.

Other students leverage their military experience into internships and full-time jobs. After serving as a Marine, Cobb worked for a security firm that provided diplomatic security for politicians, including former Vice President Joe Biden and Senator John McCain. He used his military background to secure an internship with Deloitte’s federal practice, where he will return full-time after graduation.

Translate military experience into business terms grows more complicated when veterans look toward industries not directly related to defense. Salas interned at Hashed Health, a collaborative health care innovation company that focuses on blockchain and distributed ledger technologies.

“Being able to speak to my skill set in a way that related to the business world was extremely difficult,” Salas said. “I would highly recommend finding a way to quantify the skills that one brings to the table as a veteran in terms that are more familiar to business people.”

Image
Chris Salas (middle) takes in a Nashville Sounds game with other members of the Armed Forces Club

Transitioning to the Civilian World

Once veterans secure internships and jobs, they’re faced with a very different leadership hierarchy than they’re used to. Veterans who once led a platoon of 60 soldiers in a war zone may now find themselves reporting to an executive who has never managed more than five or six people at a time, which can cause friction. Some leaders may be receptive to veterans’ leadership insights, while others may not.

“The military gives you so much experience so young. The majority of the Army is under the age of 30,” Fitzgibbons said. “I think that a lot of people struggle realizing that when you go into the civilian world, you’re going to have more experience than the person you’re working for, even though you’re younger.”

Veterans must also adjust to the lack of structure in the civilian world, which can have both positive and negative impacts. They are used to a highly regimented lifestyle, and adjusting to the more flexible nature of business school can be a challenge. Civilian students may show up late to group meetings, or propose unorthodox ways to tackle assignments, neither of which is encouraged in military environments.

“Veterans are taught to do things a certain way, and that’s how they do it for however many years they are enlisted. A lot of those habits are ingrained,” Salas said. “I had to manage my expectations (upon coming to business school), and that was tough.”

On the other hand, many veterans appreciate managing their own time again, as well as the less systematic nature of the business world. Cobb enjoys working more directly with business leaders and executives, which in turn makes it easier to learn from their actions.

“There’s a lot less hierarchy in the business world, which most veterans appreciate,” he said. “Developing personal relationships with professors and business leaders is deeply rewarding.”

Above all, students say that fellow veterans shouldn’t discount their military background, because many of the lessons they learned in the military do apply to civilian life.

“Coming from the military, you’ve already been tried and tested. I wouldn’t overlook that,” Fitzgibbons said. “You already know who you are, you know what matters to you…You don’t have to start from scratch, because all of that experience does transfer over.”

The post From the Service to School: Veterans and the MBA Transition appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

From the Service to School: Veterans and the MBA Transition [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: From the Service to School: Veterans and the MBA Transition
On August 1, Reed Hayes (MBA’19) signed out of the military — and came directly to the first day of quant foundations boot camp at Owen. After a long stint in the Army, including three-and-a-half years in the Special Forces (a.k.a. Green Berets), Hayes and his family decided the constant training and deployments weren’t sustainable moving forward.

Hayes considered moving straight into the workforce, but he decided that business school was the best way to launch his post-military career. He plans to go into operations, focusing on distribution, logistics, and project management.

“I went on a couple job interviews, but I didn’t really know how to sell myself, and I didn’t really feel like I had marketable skills at the time,” he said.

Image
Reed Hayes poses with his underwater infiltration team

Why Business School?

Not all veterans start business school the same day they leave the military — some use military contract positions as a stepping stone. After serving as a Cryptologic Linguist in the Air Force for six years, Chris Salas (MBA’18) became a Senior Arabic linguist for several contractors around D.C. While he enjoyed putting his foreign languages skills to use, after almost 15 years of studying or working in Arabic, he was ready for a change.

“(I asked myself) ‘What would give me the ability to make myself more marketable?’ And business school just really stood out as the prime option for me,” he said.

Image
Spencer Betts

Many veterans enroll at Owen to gain those marketable skills, even if they already have civilian work experience. After spending four-and-a-half years in the Navy (which included a round-the-world tour), Spencer Betts (MBA’19) found a job at an online lending startup, where he worked for about three years.

Betts started applying to business schools just as the startup began to take off. Friends and family wondered if he should stay with the company. Betts reasoned that it might take him five to 10 years to gain the necessary general business knowledge if he kept working full-time, or he could learn it all in two concentrated years at business school.

Most veterans leave the military in their early or mid 30s, adding to the appeal of business school’s accelerated timeline. “You can get to the same place (either way)…I’d rather frontload it,” he said. “I’ll be starting a career when I’m 35. That’s a little different.”

Image
Fitzgibbons plays with a military service dog during her Afghanistan deployment

Stacey Fitzgibbons, a mechanical engineer at Harvard and a National Guard member (a commitment that included an 11-month deployment in Afghanistan), describes business school as a “crash course” in life after the military.

“You’re introduced to so many different people that you get the experience it would probably take years to get otherwise if you just went into the civilian world,” she said.

Why Owen?

Admissions staff are highly involved in the process for every Owen applicant. Military veterans require special considerations, especially if they’re training or deployed during the application process.

Fitzgibbons had to go off the grid for an entire month — no internet or cell phone access — for military training while she waited to hear back on her business school applications. She notified each school about her absence, and received form replies from every school, except one.

“Then I got (an email) from Vanderbilt, and it was like ‘Stacey, that is so awesome. We support you entirely. Congratulations on this opportunity,’ and (the admissions staff) signed it with their names,” she recalled. “I was like, ‘That school! Forget everyone else!’”

Christie St. John, Director of Admissions for the MBA Program, acts as the point person for veteran applicants. She works with the Armed Forces club to pair interested applicants with current veteran students who can answer the prospective’s questions directly.

“Christie called me personally to tell me I was accepted into Owen. Little gestures like that really made a big impact on me,” said Jon Cobb (MBA’18), President of the Armed Forces club. “She is one of the reasons why Owen is such a veteran-friendly community.”

That level of support makes Owen a frequent top pick for prospective military students — and even if it’s not their first choice from the beginning, the personal touch can change their minds.

“I was looking at other schools to see if any of them could top Vanderbilt, but none of them did. As soon as I got into Vanderbilt, I immediately accepted,” said Jeff Lenar (MBA’19), who came directly to Owen after seven years in the Marines. “You could have given me acceptance letters to any number of top MBA programs, and I still would have picked Owen.”

Image
The Armed Forces Club attends Nashville Sounds Family Day

Campus Resources

Once veterans are enrolled at Owen, the Armed Forces club works with them to ensure the transition to business school goes smoothly. The club offers recruiting support alongside the Career Management Center, such as military-specific resume reviews. They also host social and volunteer events for student veterans throughout the school year.

“I was moved by how many people helped me, and I wanted to give back (by leading the Armed Forces club),” Cobb said. “We’re in a position to help veterans find out what they want to do with their lives and to help them succeed. That’s something I’m really excited about.”

Beyond official social events, veterans recommend connecting with each other informally, since they can draw upon a shared background that civilian students don’t have.

“Veterans need to link up with another veteran here,” Hayes said. “You’re going to walk out of a finance quiz at some point and (ask) ‘What the heck just happened?’ And your fellow veteran is going to say, ‘This is like the first day of Ranger School.’”

Transitioning to Business School

While getting an MBA is the right choice for many veterans, the transition to business school world can be tough. The first step is coming to terms with the academic workload, as many veterans have been out of school for years.

Image
Jeff Lenar enjoys the Marine Corps Birthday Ball

“I was working crazy hours doing something that I knew very well (in the Marines), and now I’m working crazy hours doing something that I don’t know very well,” Lenar said. “There’s this preconceived notion that they’re going to get out of the military and it’s going to be relaxing…(The work) is very quantitative and academic heavy, and (prospective students) really need to be aware of that.”

Veterans do value the competitive nature of business school, and appreciate that their peers are pushing themselves to excel academically.

“That’s what I like about people at business school: They will persevere, they will keep going through…instead of (saying) ‘Oh, this isn’t my subject,’” Betts said.

However, veterans can also have a different perspective on classwork, because they’re used to working under such extreme stress. While this calm demeanor can help them perform well under stress, it can also make it difficult to relate to non-military students at times.

“Business school has to be such a bubble. It’s such a great learning opportunity, but…it’s kind of hard to see people get so worked up over things like grades and finals…no one’s dying,” Fitzgibbons admitted.

“We all are working very hard and want to get A’s…Our perspective (as veterans) helps us to realize that we’re not in a war zone, nobody’s shooting at us, it’s just a stats exam,” Hayes adds.

Image
Jon Cobb

The complications from that perspective extend to the business school environment at large. Many veterans joined the military in order to help others, and some worry that business school is too focused on making a profit or securing the highest salary. However, the veterans at Owen say they can continue helping others and making a difference in their post-military careers, and encourage other veterans to keep an open mind to the possibilities.

“A lot of veterans worry about having a meaningful impact on the world as an MBA, but there are incredible opportunities at Owen to do just that,” Cobb said. “Getting an MBA has helped me meet inspiring people and gain the skills I need to lead positive change on a large scale.”

A lot of veterans worry about having a meaningful impact on the world as an MBA, but there are incredible opportunities at Owen to do just that. -Jon Cobb

Recruiting as Veterans

Most veterans are, by circumstance, career switchers, using business school as a transition time from the military to the civilian world. Vets at Owen are seeking work in diverse industries, including investment banking, health care, consulting, and engineering.

Even though they’re no longer active duty, some seek to unite their interests in business and the military while at school. First-year MBA Hayes is already working part-time at Bunker Labs, a non-profit incubator that helps military veteran entrepreneurs launch their companies.

Other students leverage their military experience into internships and full-time jobs. After serving as a Marine, Cobb worked for a security firm that provided diplomatic security for politicians, including former Vice President Joe Biden and Senator John McCain. He used his military background to secure an internship with Deloitte’s federal practice, where he will return full-time after graduation.

Translate military experience into business terms grows more complicated when veterans look toward industries not directly related to defense. Salas interned at Hashed Health, a collaborative health care innovation company that focuses on blockchain and distributed ledger technologies.

“Being able to speak to my skill set in a way that related to the business world was extremely difficult,” Salas said. “I would highly recommend finding a way to quantify the skills that one brings to the table as a veteran in terms that are more familiar to business people.”

Image
Chris Salas (middle) takes in a Nashville Sounds game with other members of the Armed Forces Club

Transitioning to the Civilian World

Once veterans secure internships and jobs, they’re faced with a very different leadership hierarchy than they’re used to. Veterans who once led a platoon of 60 soldiers in a war zone may now find themselves reporting to an executive who has never managed more than five or six people at a time, which can cause friction. Some leaders may be receptive to veterans’ leadership insights, while others may not.

“The military gives you so much experience so young. The majority of the Army is under the age of 30,” Fitzgibbons said. “I think that a lot of people struggle realizing that when you go into the civilian world, you’re going to have more experience than the person you’re working for, even though you’re younger.”

Veterans must also adjust to the lack of structure in the civilian world, which can have both positive and negative impacts. They are used to a highly regimented lifestyle, and adjusting to the more flexible nature of business school can be a challenge. Civilian students may show up late to group meetings, or propose unorthodox ways to tackle assignments, neither of which is encouraged in military environments.

“Veterans are taught to do things a certain way, and that’s how they do it for however many years they are enlisted. A lot of those habits are ingrained,” Salas said. “I had to manage my expectations (upon coming to business school), and that was tough.”

On the other hand, many veterans appreciate managing their own time again, as well as the less systematic nature of the business world. Cobb enjoys working more directly with business leaders and executives, which in turn makes it easier to learn from their actions.

“There’s a lot less hierarchy in the business world, which most veterans appreciate,” he said. “Developing personal relationships with professors and business leaders is deeply rewarding.”

Above all, students say that fellow veterans shouldn’t discount their military background, because many of the lessons they learned in the military do apply to civilian life.

“Coming from the military, you’ve already been tried and tested. I wouldn’t overlook that,” Fitzgibbons said. “You already know who you are, you know what matters to you…You don’t have to start from scratch, because all of that experience does transfer over.”

The post From the Service to School: Veterans and the MBA Transition appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Vanderbilt Business Healthcare Conference Celebrates 10th Anniversary [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Oct 2017, 06:02
FROM Owen Press Releases: Vanderbilt Business Healthcare Conference Celebrates 10th Anniversary
On Nov. 3, the Vanderbilt Business Healthcare Conference will bring together industry veterans, MBA students, and the Nashville community for a day of learning about upcoming health care trends. The student-run conference, celebrating its 10th anniversary, will be held at the Aertson Midtown hotel, located across the street from the Owen Graduate School of Management.

This year’s theme is “Disrupting Healthcare: The Radical New Ways to Consume and Deliver Healthcare.” Speakers include Dr. Peter Pronovost, Director of the Armstrong Institute; Dr. Brent James of Intermountain Health; Dr. Brian Fengler, Founder and CEO of EvidenceCare; and Jesse Spencer-Smith, Director of Data Science for HCA.

“You have speakers from companies that may have no affiliation with Vanderbilt from a recruiting perspective or a networking perspective. It really opens up your opportunities for learning engagement,” said Arielle Samet (MBA’18), who attended the conference last year.

The day-long conference concludes with a career fair and happy hour, giving attendees the opportunity to connect with each other and company representatives. Event organizers say that having a shared experience to talk about makes the networking process more natural.

“One of the best ways that you can provide value to (attendees) is to provide a networking happy hour at the end of any event,” said Ethan Hall (MBA’18), one of the conference co-chairs.

Everything from managing the budget to securing sponsors are handled by a student board of 20 people (10 first-year MBAs and 10 second-years) who work throughout the year to make the event a success. Organizers expect about 200 students from Owen to attend this year, plus a few dozen people from other schools and the surrounding community.

Attendees come to the conference for a variety of reasons, from gathering insights from industry leaders to networking with companies at the career fair; for many Owen students, it’s an early foray into a new career in an unfamiliar space.

“For me, that’s exactly why I wanted to come to Owen, to get involved in that health care space and get those hands-on experiences, such as through the Healthcare Conference,” said Dan Concepcion (MBA’19), who plans to attend this year’s event.

A significant number of Owen graduates accept jobs in the health care industry; in fact, 24% of MBAs from the class of 2016 (the most recent data available) took positions in health care. Given that Nashville is a major center of health care management and innovation, organizers believe the conference is a mutually beneficial way for talented students and area employers to connect.

“We think that we can help position Vanderbilt as the top health care-focused MBA in the country if we really push hard,” Hall said.

The Vanderbilt Business Healthcare Conference will be held on Friday, Nov. 3 at the Aertson Midtown. Learn more or register to attend at the conference website.

The post Vanderbilt Business Healthcare Conference Celebrates 10th Anniversary appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

BrandWeek Project Spotlight: AJS Inc. and KFC [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: BrandWeek Project Spotlight: AJS Inc. and KFC
This week is fall break at Owen, so rather than sitting in class, students are engaged in a variety of hands-on programs designed to immerse them in the industry of their choice. Master of Marketing students and MBA candidates in the marketing/branding concentration are participating in BrandWeek, a three-day series of marketing challenges issued by real brands. Teams are given a challenge and have anywhere between a few hours or days to come up with a plan, create their presentations, and present to the client. A recap of Monday’s challenge follows below.

The Client: AJS Inc. started in 1977 with a single KFC franchise location; decades later, the franchise company now operates more than 25 locations across Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. For 40 years, the company has served fried chicken to consumers all over the Southeast and Midwest. 

The Project: Director of Operations John Revis, who has worked at for 27 years, challenged Brand Week participants to come up with social media outreach concepts to attract millennials to apply to work at his franchises. AJS’ restaurants are actively seeking to bring in new visitors, specifically younger consumers and employees. In particular, AJS Inc. is opening a new location in the near future they will need to staff with new employees. The franchises need to communicate that KFC is an appealing place to work while staying within the KFC corporate brand guidelines. Teams had 1.5 hours to come up with ideas and ready their presentations.

The Presentations: Teams proposed a variety of promotional ideas based on personal and professional experiences. Many suggested highlighting current millennial employees and their stories, while touting relevant benefits (such as a tuition subsidy) more prominently on posts and the company’s job site. Teams also recommended updating the job application landing page, using new photos featuring younger employees in action, and suggested geo-targeting and SEO to ensure that ads are reaching the proper audiences.

The Winner: Team #4 won with their idea to create content around millennial employees and leverage existing social content posted by current employees. Team members pointed out that millennials love when brands share and retweet their posts, which in turn encourages them to re-engage with the brand. This also increases the likelihood that someone will see the brand posts on social media and recommend millennials apply for a job there. Referrals are a major source of job applications, so creating a strong brand impression to generate those referrals is key to success.

The Student Feedback: MBA and Master of Marketing students were excited to kickoff the week and get their hands on real world projects. “We participated to further expand our marketing tool belt…we’re looking to build that resume and get that hands-on experience that we don’t have since we haven’t been in the corporate world for very long,” said McKayla Denning (MMark’18).

Students enjoyed getting to explore employer branding, a specific aspect of marketing that isn’t always covered in general assignments. “It’s very easy to remember marketing from what you see on TV or what you’re exposed to as a consumer, but there are a lot of different facets to it. In this project in particular, we got to see how employers use (marketing) to retain and attract top talent, and how important that image is in addition to what you’re showing to your end consumer,” said Becky Shaver (MBA’19).

The post BrandWeek Project Spotlight: AJS Inc. and KFC appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Keeping the door open for opportunity: Renee and John Hawkins, MBA’92, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Oct 2017, 14:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Keeping the door open for opportunity: Renee and John Hawkins, MBA’92, endow scholarship
The post Keeping the door open for opportunity: Renee and John Hawkins, MBA’92, endow scholarship appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Charlotte Nicholson, MAcc’10: MAcc alum swaps spreadsheets for skates [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Oct 2017, 14:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Charlotte Nicholson, MAcc’10: MAcc alum swaps spreadsheets for skates
The post Charlotte Nicholson, MAcc’10: MAcc alum swaps spreadsheets for skates appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Owen Reunion Recap [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Oct 2017, 15:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Owen Reunion Recap
All alumni who graduated in years ending in 2 or 7 were invited back for the weekend. Weekend highlights included the Owen Circle dinner honoring the 2017 Owen Distinguished Alumnus on Thursday evening, the alumni cocktail reception at the school Friday evening and class parties at some of Nashville’s top locales on Saturday.

Enjoy photos from the weekend!

The post Owen Reunion Recap appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

BrandWeek Project Spotlight: Author C.G. Cooper and Ascend Federal Cre [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Oct 2017, 11:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: BrandWeek Project Spotlight: Author C.G. Cooper and Ascend Federal Credit Union
Corey Cleek, Adjunct Professor of Marketing, opened day 2 of BrandWeek with a lecture on brand attributes and positioning, marketing channels, and more. Primed with his tactical advice, students were ready to take on their first challenge.

C.G. Cooper

Image
The Client:
After serving six years in the Marines and starting his own property management business, C.G. Cooper found his true creative calling as an author of novels. He uses his background in the Marines to pen military thrillers but has also published science fiction and children’s fantasy books. Cooper markets and publishes his books almost exclusively on digital platforms.

The Project: In addition to his books, Cooper is also working on two related initiatives: a podcast called “Books in 30”; and a media brand dubbed JBD Entertainment that promotes books co-authored by Cooper and other writers. Cooper is looking for podcast marketing strategies that will drive the growth of his individual publishing efforts and JBD Entertainment. He also asked students to consider how his personal brand should interact with the larger brand of JBD Entertainment.

The Presentations: Cooper’s mailing list is a major driver of growth and book sales, so many team’s suggestions focused on getting signups, through prize offerings or prominent placements on his website. Many teams recommended that he bring his various brands together under one online presence. Others focused on optimizing social content to build Cooper’s personal brand, such as sharing quotes from his books on Instagram.

The Winner: Team #2 won with their suggestion to integrate the podcast with the mailing list. Readers who sign up for the mailing list would be entered to win podcast-related prizes, such as a call from Cooper himself that can be recorded and featured on an episode. They also suggested that Cooper emphasize his military background through #TBT social media posts and his Amazon author bio.

The Feedback: While Cooper praised all the teams and said he would take ideas from each presentation, he really resonated with Team #2’s recommendation to involves readers and listeners in the creation of the podcast. “They’re probably going to share that with their friends, and that’s deep engagement,” he said. He also gave a shout-out to Team #5’s suggestion to build his brand following on social media, rather than only trying push calls to action. “The one thing that I won’t be able to forget is the idea of brand equity. You can have a brand, but to have brand equity…you can’t buy that. You have to build it,” he said.

Image
Team #2 celebrates their win with author C.G. Cooper (fifth from left)

Ascend Federal Credit Union

The Client: The largest credit union in Middle Tennessee, Ascend Federal Credit Union is a non-profit full-service financial institution that provides accounts and loans to members. There are a variety of avenues that potential members can use to sign up, from working at a partner company to making a donation to The Nature Conservancy. Ascend returns any profits to the business and its shareholders, which include credit union members.

The Project: In 2015, Ascend purchased 10-year naming rights to the new amphitheater in downtown Nashville. The credit union’s marketing team is seeking to leverage the venue’s name (Ascend Amphitheater) to grow its brand and increase market share. Specifically, Ascend is looking to connect with millennial concertgoers and acquire their business, be it through new account openings, auto loans, or another service.

Image
Ascend Amphitheater

The Presentations: Teams presented ideas for marketing ideas before, during, and after concerts. Ascend-themed Snapchat geo-filters were a popular suggestion, as were concert-related giveaways such as free parking, tickets, VIP upgrades, t-shirts, and cozies. A couple of groups suggested hosting viewing parties for Predators away games and other sporting events to get more people into the amphitheater and create more marketing opportunities.

The Winner: Team #1 noted that Ascend already promotes a lot of values that millennials think are important: not-for-profit, eco-friendly, community-focused. They suggested that Ascend highlight these values (and their partnership with The Nature Conservancy) by handing out biodegradable cups and cozies printed with their logo at concerts. They also recommended that Ascend pursue strategic advertising partnerships with local businesses frequented by millennials, such as gyms, universities, and apartment complexes.

The Feedback: Rachel Carrick, Assistant Vice President of Marketing at Ascend, greatly appreciated how Team #1’s tagline (“Save the planet. Save money. Save a seat.”) incorporates both the financial and social values of Ascend. She also praised Team #2 for suggesting that branches stage up-and-coming music acts, as well as creating a branded playlist of upcoming amphitheater acts on Spotify. “I want to make (those concerts) happen right now,” she said.

The post BrandWeek Project Spotlight: Author C.G. Cooper and Ascend Federal Credit Union appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Vanderbilt MBA Graduates Reach New Record-Highs in Compensation [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Oct 2017, 13:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Vanderbilt MBA Graduates Reach New Record-Highs in Compensation
Graduates from the full-time MBA program at Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management reported average base salary earnings of $113,205 per year, marking a nearly 2.6 percent increase from the previous year, which until now had been the highest on record. The average starting/signing bonus was $25,232, which makes the Class of 2017 the highest compensated class in Owen history.

This year’s robust hiring was led by the technology sector (at 25 percent), followed by consulting (18 percent), financial services (18 percent), and healthcare (16 percent).

“We count ourselves as very fortunate to work with a fantastic group of recruiting partners across a variety of industries,” said Emily Anderson, Director of the Career Management Center.

At commencement in mid-May, 83 percent of the 2017 MBA graduates had received at least one job offer. That figure rose to 93 percent three months after graduation, a common measure used by business schools to compare hiring outcomes. In addition, 83 percent of the graduates with an offer received a median signing bonus of $25,000, also a record amount.

Geographically, 41 percent of this year’s MBA class took positions in the South – 16 percent took positions in the Nashville Metro area alone. The West region accounted for 20 percent of geographic placements, while the Northeast accounted for 15 percent. The Southwest, Midwest, and Mid-Atlantic regions accounted for 11 percent, 10 percent, and 3 percent of all positions taken, respectively.

One-hundred percent of Owen students seeking summer internships in the MBA class of 2019 received an offer and spent their summer in a variety of industries including health care (23%),  financial services (16%), technology (16%), manufacturing (11%) and consulting (10%).

Anderson thanks Owen alumni for their role in the recruiting process. “Our alumni continue to provide invaluable help engaging with current students and providing mentorship and advice as well as connections and contacts for recruiting,” she said. “We cannot thank them enough for their continued help and support.”

A summary of this year’s MBA employment and internship report may be viewed here.

The post Vanderbilt MBA Graduates Reach New Record-Highs in Compensation appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 179

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Catching up with Vanderbilt’s First-Ever Summer Grant Entrepreneurs [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Oct 2017, 11:01
FROM Owen Press Releases: Catching up with Vanderbilt’s First-Ever Summer Grant Entrepreneurs
With Mod 1 coming to a close, we caught up with the inaugural winners of the Summer Grant program. Each was given $15,000 to research, investigate, and/or launch a concept, with the hope that they’ll be better positioned for success in their second year, which may include earning a $25,000 Sohr Grant.

Rachel Rock-Blake
 

Her concept: Green Anchor, a certification designed to combat Invasive Species

Image
Rachel Rock-Blake (MBA’18)

Her background: Invasive species have been on Rachel Rock-Blake’s mind for years. Before coming to Vanderbilt, the she worked with a researcher that focused on the marine variety of invasive species, giving her a background on the topic at large and relevant policy issues. She noticed a frustrating trend in the common approaches to handling Asian Carp, Lionfish, and other species (maritime or otherwise) that are introduced to a foreign environment and thrive at the expense of original inhabitants.

“There are lots of efforts to prevent new invasive species from showing up, like hoses at docks to spray down boats, but once they get somewhere, it’s difficult to do anything about them,” she says. “When people do try to remove species, it’s usually involves a government spending a lot of money to remove something from a highly valued area.” Rock-Blake arrived at Owen looking for a way to change the perception of these foreign invaders from value-destroyer to valuable resource.

Her first year: Rock-Blake pitched a potential solution (she called it “a loose version of ‘catch the fish and use them’”) at the first FireStarter of the year. It fizzled. “I was talking too much about the science and hadn’t honed in on the business application,” she explained. After taking a suggestion from economics professor Luke Froeb, she looked into certification as a mechanism to open up new markets to invasive species.

“Certifications raise the value of a product,” she says. “It creates a higher willingness to pay, because people have a sense of social responsibility.”

She began formulating her pitch around certifications at subsequent FireStarters and other events, earning 3rd place at the inaugural Owen Venture Competition, before applying for the summer grant.

Her summer: Rock-Blake used the funds to hit the road to validate her concept, learn more about the certification business, and visit the frontlines of the fight against Asian Carp, a variety of invasive species that has dramatically impacted ecosystems across the Mississippi River Watershed, which in turn damages a sport-fishing industry that carries a significant economic impact across several states.

Rock-Blake is beginning with the Asian Carp because it represents “a hugely undervalued resource that needs to be removed.” Carp have a bad connotation in the US (unlike in Europe and Asia) but as primary feeders that are low in mercury and high in protein, they are clean and tasty fish.

She spent a lot of time in Kentucky, the first state to establish an official carp program. Working with the state’s Fish & Wildlife Invasive Species Task Force, she rode along with commercial fishing boats subsidized to fish for Asian Carp, talking with officials and fishing industry leaders about her concept. Rock-Blake took a closer look at the certification industry as well, connecting with non-profits like Free Trade to learn about their business models, certification criteria, and operating procedures. She talked to potential customers that rely on certifications to adhere to quality standards.

Rock-Blake used her insights to refine her business model, estimating team structures and associated costs. She’s designed a logo and started development on a website. And, perhaps most importantly, she started developing her product – the certification standard.

Her Next Steps: Rock-Blake plans to apply for the Sohr Grant and foundation- and government-based grants. Once her certification standards are drafted and vetted by the scientific community, she’d like to get a couple of early adopters. The Asian Carp outfit is a good place to start, as they already have the fishery and three processing plants.

“I’m excited because I think this could be big,” she says eagerly. “I kept waiting for someone to tell me that it’s already been or being done, or that there’s a glaring reason it won’t work. I still haven’t gotten it.”

Patrick Morsches
 

His concept: Let’s Room Together, a website that helps graduate students find roommates

Image
Patrick Morsches (MBA’18)

His background: The former investment operations strategist from T. Rowe Price came up with the concept for Let’s Room Together last summer, as he struggled with the housing search process in Nashville. “I was looking for a roommate to cover costs, but there wasn’t a good platform to use,” he explains. “I was meeting strangers that had different schedules, people with full-time jobs that didn’t have the same needs as grad students.”

Morsches ended up getting engaged that summer and making the move with his fiancée, but the lack of attractive search options (short of a marriage proposal) intrigued him. With a business problem in hand, he set about finding a solution.

His First Year: Morsches hit the ground running. He ran the idea by Owen’s admissions team, who loved the concept. The judges at the early FireStarter sessions did as well.

A self-taught programmer, Morsches built out the website and functionality, creating a viable beta version he could bring to graduate programs, specifically their admissions staff. Along the way, he took 1st place at the Owen Venture Competition and landed two graduate programs as early adopters.

Through the rapid development, Professor Germain Boer provided invaluable assistance. “He was a big help,” Morsches says, “connecting me to people who could answer my questions, and provided a great environment in which to take a business from nothing into something that actually works.”

His Summer: With programs in tow, Morsches launched Let’s Room Together, de-bugging along the way to increase scalability. He used funds from the grant on server traffic, marketing, and a website demo that he can bring to more programs.

There’s another customer base for Let’s Room Together that he began considering as well. “Property Managers can help a lot, uploading their housing information for upcoming students, which helps,” Morsches explains. “They like graduate students as tenants, because they’re pre-vetted by the university and stay for two to three years.”

He also works with a North Carolina-based partner to help expand into the Tar Heel State, which boasts several graduate programs in the Research Triangle area alone.

His Next Steps: Morsches plans to sustain the momentum, expanding into more graduate school programs and meeting with admissions teams and interested faculty to help spread the word.

“I came to Owen to get out of my 9-5 finance job, but I didn’t know what I wanted to go into,” he recalls. “Once I saw the need for a roommate website, I just went for it. It’s not what I planned on doing, but it’s where I’m going now.”

Hunter Flint 
 

His concept: A better way to pay informal workers and reduce cash risk for companies through mobile money.

Image
Hunter Flint (MBA’18)

His background: Flint went to Tanzania in 2007 with a non-profit foundation. His interest in agriculture drew him into the world of coffee farms, where he became the General Manager of Burka Coffee Estates. After the farm was placed in an urban planning zone, he started looking toward the next chapter in his career — a search that led him to Owen.

His First Year: He was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug early. “When you’re starting a company, you’re trying to solve problems,” he says, “and the problems I know are Tanzania problems.”

In a country where 50% of workers don’t have bank accounts, pay day is a big problem. Companies in Tanzania and throughout Africa have safes on-site to compensate day laborers and informal workers, creating security risks for companies and employees alike. The mobile money industry, which is booming on the continent, mitigates these “cash risks,” but systems integration remains stuck in the early stages. Flint began reaching out to his network in the US and abroad to research possible software solutions, while pitching and refining his concept through FireStarters and Professor Michael Burcham’s “Launching the Venture” class.

His Summer: Flint used his grant money to finance a three-week trip back to Tanzania, where he met with business owners and operators, banks, and third-party integrators to more fully understand the mobile money landscape, opportunities, and pain points. To avoid introducing bias, he kept his software concept under wraps. “I tried to determine all of the costs involved, and the relationships between integrators, mobile money telecom companies, and banks,” he says.

He ended up talking with two to three people a day on his trip. “School is a great time to consider starting a business, because everyone’s willing to talk to you. You’re not a competitor, you’re just a student wanting to learn,” he notes.

His takeaway? “The issues are more basic than I thought,” he concludes. “I thought I was going to add functionality to payroll, but it came down to the payroll itself: Microsoft databases from the 90s that get updated once a year. It’s not modern.”

Everyone he talked to was excited by the prospect of a more contemporary solution – one that can track taxes, social security contributions, and other fine points – but the market’s needs were fundamental in nature, while Flint’s concept was more complementary. In addition, the current political situation in Tanzania adds a layer of complexity to foreign business.

His Next Steps: Flint has spent Mod 1 following up with contacts, refining his concept, and working with the Center for Entrepreneurship and Turner Family Center to identify opportunities in other markets. He has a classmate that’s willing to connect him with offshore engineers that can build a beta version of his product, which will undoubtedly come in handy as he progresses.

Bigger picture, the father of three is looking forward to spending time with his family and in the classroom, “because in a year’s time, I won’t be able to do that anymore,” he muses. “When’s the next time I’m going to be in school again? I’m working on my idea, but I also want to soak up this next year.”

The post Catching up with Vanderbilt’s First-Ever Summer Grant Entrepreneurs appeared first on Vanderbilt Business School.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 15

Catching up with Vanderbilt’s First-Ever Summer Grant Entrepreneurs   [#permalink] 13 Oct 2017, 11:01

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7    Next  [ 122 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Vanderbilt MBA Admissions and Related Blogs

  new topic post reply Update application status  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.