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Verb-ed words

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Joined: 02 Sep 2016
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Verb-ed words [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2017, 21:28
Hi all !!

Verb-ed words can act as verb (when the subject is doing the action) and they can be adjective (e.g. The surprised candidate entered the room for the interview).

But can verb-ed words act as nouns?
I am trying to think of a sentence but not able to come up with one that uses verb-ed words as noun.

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Joined: 04 Dec 2015
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Re: Verb-ed words [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2017, 12:18
Well, sometimes, but it's not really something to worry about.

You can see ed-verbs used as nouns in constructions like this one:

The oppressed rose up and overcame their oppressors.

I'm not sure whether you'd ever see that on the GMAT, though.

You can also see ed-verbs used in predicates - the second part of the 'who did what' of a sentence. This is worth noting, because nouns can also appear in predicates. For example:

The man is embarrassed.
The man is a doctor.

'Embarrassed' is an ed-verb (here, serving as an adjective). 'A doctor' is a noun. They can appear in the same place in the sentence, and they serve the same purpose. However, that doesn't mean that the ed-verb is a noun.
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Kudos [?]: 258 [0], given: 61

Re: Verb-ed words   [#permalink] 12 Apr 2017, 12:18
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Verb-ed words

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