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When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage

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When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 08:41
1
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A
B
C
D
E

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  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

65% (01:50) correct 35% (01:34) wrong based on 88 sessions

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When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage in what primatologists call "threat gestures": grunting, spitting, or making abrupt, upsweeping arm movements. Chimpanzees also sometimes attack other chimpanzees out of anger. However, when they do attack, they almost never take time to make threat gestures first. And, conversely, threat gestures are rarely followed by physical attacks.

Which one of the following, if true, most helps to explain the information about how often threat gestures are accompanied by physical attacks?

(A) Chimpanzees engage in threat gestures when they are angry in order to preserve or enhance social status.
(B) Making threat gestures helps chimpanzees vent aggressive feelings and thereby avoid physical aggression.
(C) Threat gestures and physical attacks are not the only means by which chimpanzees display aggression.
(D) Chimpanzees often respond to other chimpanzees' threat gestures with threat gestures of their own.
(E) The chimpanzees that most often make threat gestures are the ones that least often initiate physical attacks.

Source: LSAT

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Re: When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 08:54
A, D and E don't make sense. Between B and D, it was a bit hard for me to choose. I went in for B after re reading the stem and especially the last line. B, then, seemed to be the best answer choice.
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Re: When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 09:28
Conclusion stated :

Chimpanzees when make angry
gestures don't attack and if they attack then in that case that they don't make angry gestures before.

This is basically indirect strengthen/support the Conclusion question wherein we are looking for answer choice which explains the Conclusion of the argument stated.

A) Does not link angry gestures and physical attack - eliminate

B) Links angry gestures and physical attack - explains the Conclusion - Hold

C) Talks about aggression venting means in chimpanzees - eliminate

D)Does not link angry gestures and physical attack - eliminate

E)The chimpanzees that ......are the ones that ...

"that"- talks about specific chimpanzees - Doesn't help to explain the Conclusion

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Re: When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 09:29
Conclusion stated :

Chimpanzees when make angry
gestures don't attack and if they attack then in that case that they don't make angry gestures before.

This is basically indirect strengthen/support the Conclusion question wherein we are looking for answer choice which explains the Conclusion of the argument stated.

A) Does not link angry gestures and physical attack - eliminate

B) Links angry gestures and physical attack - explains the Conclusion - Hold

C) Talks about aggression venting means in chimpanzees - eliminate

D)Does not link angry gestures and physical attack - eliminate

E)The chimpanzees that ......are the ones that ...

"that"- talks about specific chimpanzees - Doesn't help to explain the Conclusion

Ans:B

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When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 11:41
Akela wrote:
When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage in what primatologists call "threat gestures": grunting, spitting, or making abrupt, upsweeping arm movements. Chimpanzees also sometimes attack other chimpanzees out of anger. However,when they do attack, they almost never take time to make threat gestures first. And, conversely, threat gestures are rarely followed by physical attacks.

Which one of the following, if true, most helps to explain the information about how often threat gestures are accompanied by physical attacks?[/color]

(A) Chimpanzees engage in threat gestures when they are angry in order to preserve or enhance [color=#ff0000]social status.

(B) Making threat gestures helps chimpanzees vent aggressive feelings and thereby avoid physical aggression.
(C) Threat gestures and physical attacks are not the only means by which chimpanzees display aggression.
(D) Chimpanzees often respond to other chimpanzees' threat gestures with threat gestures of their own.
(E) The chimpanzees that most often make threat gestures are the ones that least often initiate physical attacks.

Source: LSAT
We understand from the highlighted statement that -

Threat gestures = No Attack.

Among the given options only (B) states that Chimps avoid Physical attacks by using threat gestures, errors in other options highlighted.
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Re: When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 14:12
Akela wrote:
When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage in what primatologists call "threat gestures": grunting, spitting, or making abrupt, upsweeping arm movements. Chimpanzees also sometimes attack other chimpanzees out of anger. However, when they do attack, they almost never take time to make threat gestures first. And, conversely, threat gestures are rarely followed by physical attacks.

Which one of the following, if true, most helps to explain the information about how often threat gestures are accompanied by physical attacks?

(A) Chimpanzees engage in threat gestures when they are angry in order to preserve or enhance social status.
(B) Making threat gestures helps chimpanzees vent aggressive feelings and thereby avoid physical aggression.
(C) Threat gestures and physical attacks are not the only means by which chimpanzees display aggression.
(D) Chimpanzees often respond to other chimpanzees' threat gestures with threat gestures of their own.
(E) The chimpanzees that most often make threat gestures are the ones that least often initiate physical attacks.

Source: LSAT


The correct answer must explain why an angry chimpanzee does not physically attack after making threat gestures.
Only B gives a valid reason:
Making threat gestures helps chimpanzees vent aggressive feelings and thereby avoid physical aggression.
Here, chimpanzees use threat gestures to express aggressive feelings, eliminating the desire to attack physically.


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Re: When chimpanzees become angry at other chimpanzees, they often engage &nbs [#permalink] 05 Jul 2018, 14:12
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