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With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward a

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With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward a [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 10:08
nightblade354 wrote:
Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but isn't C saying that Eugene O'Neill's plays came to terms with a difficult personal history?

I feel this comparison isn't correct.


No, C says.... "as Eugene O'Neill's did, has come to terms with a difficult personal history through their"...

The whole gist is that Leo has come to terms with a difficult personal history through the dramatizations of his works, just as O'Neill once did. Not an expert, but it helps to understand what the prompt is talking about before evoking the grammar laws.
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Re: With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward a [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2018, 02:25
Hi GMATNinja,

Thanks for the explanation.
I chose C and then I rejected C because of the Possessive O'Neill's did
Why the 's, what exactly is it referring to?

Thanks and regards


GMATNinja wrote:
thanhphong01 wrote:
With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward autobiographical material and, like Eugene O'Neill's, have come to terms with a difficult personal history through their dramatizations.

(A) like Eugene O'Neill's have come to terms with a difficult personal history through their ==> Like is perfectly wrong here.

(B) like Eugene O'Neill's, has come to terms with a difficult personal history through his ==> the same as B

(C) as Eugene O'Neill's did, has come to terms with a difficult personal history through their ==> AS EO did or AS EO has done is ok, but we have a correct Subject-Verb Agreement here.

(D) as Eugene O'Neill has done, have come to terms with a difficult personal history through their ==> Mr.Leonardo has turned...and have come, incorrect

(E) as with Eugene O'Neill, has come to terms with a difficult personal history through his ==> as with is very awkward

Many people will raise questions about the pronoun "their". In my opinion, their refers to both Mr.Leonardo's and Eugene O'Neill's'. It's just my opinion. I still need an expert's confirmation for this thought.

I think this looks really good. "Like" doesn't make sense, since we're not directly comparing O'Neill's plays with Leonard's plays, so (A) and (B) are clearly out. (D) has a subject-verb error.

The problem with (E) isn't necessarily that "as with" is awkward. Since we have a comparison using "as", the two phrases being compared need to be structurally parallel -- and they really aren't here. Rearranging (E) a little bit, we get the following comparison: "As with Eugene O'Neill, with his (Leonard's) last three plays..." And that really doesn't make sense: we're comparing "with O'Neill" to "with Leonard's plays." So that takes care of (E).

So what about the pronoun in (C)? Whenever you see "their", you should always look for a plural noun earlier in the sentence, and we only have one option here: "plays." And that actually works! "...though the plays' dramatizations." So (C) is perfectly fine.
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Re: With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward a [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2018, 16:42
Hi TheRzS,

Thanks for your question! In answer C, the possessive "O'Neill's" is referring to the plays that O'Neill also wrote. You could just as easily spell it out for readers by saying "as Eugene O'Neill's plays did," but that's not necessary - the reader can infer that's what it means.

I hope this helps!
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Re: With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward a [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2018, 17:03
OK thanks EMPOWERgmatVerbal

EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hi TheRzS,

Thanks for your question! In answer C, the possessive "O'Neill's" is referring to the plays that O'Neill also wrote. You could just as easily spell it out for readers by saying "as Eugene O'Neill's plays did," but that's not necessary - the reader can infer that's what it means.

I hope this helps!
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With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward a [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2018, 05:45
TheRzS wrote:
Hi GMATNinja,

Thanks for the explanation.
I chose C and then I rejected C because of the Possessive O'Neill's did
Why the 's, what exactly is it referring to?

Thanks and regards


GMATNinja wrote:
thanhphong01 wrote:
With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward autobiographical material and, like Eugene O'Neill's, have come to terms with a difficult personal history through their dramatizations.

(A) like Eugene O'Neill's have come to terms with a difficult personal history through their ==> Like is perfectly wrong here.

(B) like Eugene O'Neill's, has come to terms with a difficult personal history through his ==> the same as B

(C) as Eugene O'Neill's did, has come to terms with a difficult personal history through their ==> AS EO did or AS EO has done is ok, but we have a correct Subject-Verb Agreement here.

(D) as Eugene O'Neill has done, have come to terms with a difficult personal history through their ==> Mr.Leonardo has turned...and have come, incorrect

(E) as with Eugene O'Neill, has come to terms with a difficult personal history through his ==> as with is very awkward

Many people will raise questions about the pronoun "their". In my opinion, their refers to both Mr.Leonardo's and Eugene O'Neill's'. It's just my opinion. I still need an expert's confirmation for this thought.

I think this looks really good. "Like" doesn't make sense, since we're not directly comparing O'Neill's plays with Leonard's plays, so (A) and (B) are clearly out. (D) has a subject-verb error.

The problem with (E) isn't necessarily that "as with" is awkward. Since we have a comparison using "as", the two phrases being compared need to be structurally parallel -- and they really aren't here. Rearranging (E) a little bit, we get the following comparison: "As with Eugene O'Neill, with his (Leonard's) last three plays..." And that really doesn't make sense: we're comparing "with O'Neill" to "with Leonard's plays." So that takes care of (E).

So what about the pronoun in (C)? Whenever you see "their", you should always look for a plural noun earlier in the sentence, and we only have one option here: "plays." And that actually works! "...though the plays' dramatizations." So (C) is perfectly fine.


I have the same question. Even though I arrived at C by using parallelism (has ... and has....) and meaning ("their" refers to "plays"), the ONeill's does not make sense. It sounds as if we are comparing Mr Leonard with O'Neill's (plays). Correct comparison? I doubt! Can anyone please help?
With his last three plays Mr. Leonard has turned increasingly toward a   [#permalink] 13 May 2018, 05:45

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