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Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely

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Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 24 Apr 2013, 11:09
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Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled in cheaper insurance plans imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend less time with each.

A. imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend
B. that impose stricter limits on medical services, require doctors to see more patients, and spend
C. that impose stricter limits on medical services and require doctors to see more patients, spending
D. imposing stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients, and spending
E. that impose stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients and spending

Why is not correct here? As Verb -ing (imposing) without comma is also modifying (describing) the preceding noun "plans"

Whether the clause "sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled" is ok. Is "to be enrolled" verb here?

Originally posted by ranjeet75 on 24 Apr 2013, 10:50.
Last edited by Zarrolou on 24 Apr 2013, 11:09, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Verb "to be"  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2013, 11:11
what is the source of this question for the non underlined portion is itself so wrong ---->the verb is missing in the non underlined portion : sales personnel less are likely than support personnel
kindly check the source
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Re: Verb "to be"  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2013, 20:15
ranjeet75 wrote:
Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled in cheaper insurance plans imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend less time with each.

A. imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend
B. that impose stricter limits on medical services, require doctors to see more patients, and spend
C. that impose stricter limits on medical services and require doctors to see more patients, spending
D. imposing stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients, and spending
E. that impose stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients and spending

Why is not correct here? As Verb -ing (imposing) without comma is also modifying (describing) the preceding noun "plans"

Whether the clause "sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled" is ok. Is "to be enrolled" verb here?


"To be enrolled" is not a conjugated (or working) verb - this sentence is missing the verb and should read "sales personnel are less likely than support personnel".

'Imposing' can modify plans and it would be parallel with 'requiring', but then the last phrase "and spend less time with each" doesn't have a logical connection to the rest of the sentence.

KW
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Re: Verb "to be"  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2013, 05:12
KyleWiddison wrote:
ranjeet75 wrote:
Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled in cheaper insurance plans imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend less time with each.

A. imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend
B. that impose stricter limits on medical services, require doctors to see more patients, and spend
C. that impose stricter limits on medical services and require doctors to see more patients, spending
D. imposing stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients, and spending
E. that impose stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients and spending

Why is not correct here? As Verb -ing (imposing) without comma is also modifying (describing) the preceding noun "plans"

Whether the clause "sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled" is ok. Is "to be enrolled" verb here?


"To be enrolled" is not a conjugated (or working) verb - this sentence is missing the verb and should read "sales personnel are less likely than support personnel".

'Imposing' can modify plans and it would be parallel with 'requiring', but then the last phrase "and spend less time with each" doesn't have a logical connection to the rest of the sentence.

KW



Please explain detailed analysis of other options as well.

Thanks,
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Re: Verb "to be"  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2013, 19:29
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On each answer choice, you need to look at what is being modified by the last part of the underline - spend/spending.

A) ' , and spend' needs to be part of a three part list, but because the first two items are grouped together 'spend' doesn't have a logical connection to the rest of the sentence
B) spend is part of a three item list, but it now illogically states that plans spend less time with patients
C) correct, here spending is the result of the requirement of doctors to see more patients
D) spending is part of a three item list, but it illogically states that plans are spending less time with patients
E) here spending is modifying plans again - illogically suggesting that plans are spending less time with patients

KW

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Re: Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2013, 23:36
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Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled in cheaper insurance plans imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend less time with each.

A. imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend
Wrong. "and spend" is not parallel.

B. that impose stricter limits on medical services, require doctors to see more patients, and spend
Wrong. Not parallel. ..."insurance plans that impose..., require...., and spend....". The insurance plans cannot spend time with each patient.

C. that impose stricter limits on medical services and require doctors to see more patients, spending
Correct. "spending" modifies the previous clause with the subject doctors.

D. imposing stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients, and spending
Wrong. Modifier problem. The insurance plans cannot spend time.

E. that impose stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients and spending
Wrong. Not parallel.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2013, 17:57
ranjeet75 wrote:
Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled in cheaper insurance plans imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend less time with each.

A. imposing stricter limits on medical services and requiring doctors to see more patients, and spend
B. that impose stricter limits on medical services, require doctors to see more patients, and spend
C. that impose stricter limits on medical services and require doctors to see more patients, spending
D. imposing stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients, and spending
E. that impose stricter limits on medical services, requiring doctors to see more patients and spending

Why is not correct here? As Verb -ing (imposing) without comma is also modifying (describing) the preceding noun "plans"

Whether the clause "sales personnel less likely than support personnel to be enrolled" is ok. Is "to be enrolled" verb here?


As discussed above the original sentence is missing a verb. Kind of a tricky question. The last verb spend holds the key to the answer choices.
The plan does two things :
impose ...... and require........., spending .... is correct.

C wins. , ING modifier modifies the entire preceding clause.
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Re: Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2017, 01:55
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There is a golden rule in parallelism that whenever there are more than one factor, we must check whether there is a factor that causes the other factor/factors. If so, we must express the casual clause with a tensed verb, while the resultant factor/ factors should be expressed in a modified form, mostly comma plus verbing format.
In this case, the necessity of spending less time with each patient arises because the rule requires doctors to see more patients within a given time to reduce costs.
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Re: Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2019, 03:25
A – ‘and spend’ is not // to ‘requiring’
B – This makes it sound like the insurance plans are seeing more patients
C- Correct
D – Same as B, makes it sound like the insurance plans are the ones spending less time
E – ‘impose’, ‘requiring’, and ‘and spending’ are not parallel
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Re: Within medical devices industry, sales personnel less likely   [#permalink] 10 Mar 2019, 03:25
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