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Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been (Part 1)

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Status: Aiming MBA
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
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Kudos [?]: 1063 [0], given: 74

Location: India
Concentration: Healthcare, Technology
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Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been (Part 1) [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2017, 09:56
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Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

56% (01:34) correct 44% (00:56) wrong based on 73 sessions

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Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been applied to wet plaster. Once dried, a fresco indelibly preserves the paint that a painter has applied in this way. Unfortunately, additions known to have been made by later painters have obscured the original fresco work done by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel. Therefore, in order to restore Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel paintings to the appearance that Michelangelo intended them to have, everything except the original fresco work must be stripped away.

Stephen: But it was extremely common for painters of Michelangelo’s era to add painted details to their own fresco work after the frescos had dried.

Stephen’s response to Zachary proceeds by

(A) calling into question an assumption on which Zachary’s conclusion depends
(B) challenging the definition of a key term in Zachary reaches
(C) drawing a conclusion other than the one that Zachary reaches
(D) denying the truth of one of the stated premises of Zachary’s argument
(E) demonstrating that Zachary’s conclusion is not consistent with the premises he uses to support it

Source: LSAT

Link to Part 2
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been (Part 1) [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2017, 21:15
IMO - D

Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been applied to wet plaster. Once dried, a fresco indelibly preserves the paint that a painter has applied in this way. Unfortunately, additions known to have been made by later painters have obscured the original fresco work done by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel. Therefore, in order to restore Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel paintings to the appearance that Michelangelo intended them to have, everything except the original fresco work must be stripped away.

Stephen: But it was extremely common for painters of Michelangelo’s era to add painted details to their own fresco work after the frescos had dried.

From highlighted part we can conclude Stephen is denying with Zachary
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Re: Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been (Part 1) [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2017, 11:22
Clear option A. Stephen counters Zachary's argument by questioning his assumption that removing other painters' additions will leave us with Michelangelo's original work. It won't because Angelo himself might have created multiple versions, which cannot be separated out to reach the original.

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Re: Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been (Part 1)   [#permalink] 17 Oct 2017, 11:22
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Zachary: The term “fresco” refers to paint that has been (Part 1)

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