GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 23 Oct 2018, 17:49

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

A child's conception of whether certain behavior

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 27 Oct 2013
Posts: 4
A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Oct 2013, 23:15
7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

39% (02:11) correct 61% (02:30) wrong based on 267 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong, referred to as "behavioral pre-disposition," is fully developed by the age of 10. During a person's teenage years, other teenagers with whom the person associates regularly have a significant influence on whether the person later acts in accordance with his or her predisposition. In other words, teenagers tend to mimic their peers' behavior. It is interesting to note that the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers and associated primarily with other teenagers who later became adult criminals.

Which of the following conclusions can most properly be drawn from the information above?

[A] A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong can change during the child's teenage years.
[B] Until a child becomes a teenager it is impossible to predict whether the child will eventually become an adult criminal.
[C] Law-abiding adults are unlikely to have developed a predisposition for adult criminal behavior.
[D] An adult criminal is likely to have been predisposed as a child to criminal behavior.
[E] Pre-teen children who are not predisposed to criminal behavior are unlikely to become adult criminals.

Am I wrong or is the OA wrong? Please help.

[Source: Peterson's, Master the GMAT 2013]

Official answer is D. The official explanation is as follows:

Based on the last sentence of the passage, we can conclude that juvenile criminals associate primarily with other juvenile criminals, and that adult criminals constitute the same group of people who were juvenile criminals. For choice (D) to not be readily inferable would require most adult criminals associate primarily with law-abiding peers as teenagers. But this contradicts what we know about adult criminals, based on the passage information. Thus, choice (D) is strongly inferable.

I find some of the reasoning here flawed. Juvenile criminals do associate with other juvenile criminals, BUT juvenile criminals might have had acted for or against their pre-teen conception of right and wrong. But (D) claims that they were predisposed. Or, to flip it around (as the OA does): for choice (D) to not be readily inferable would require adult criminals associate primarily with teenagers who had the correct conception of what constitutes a bad behavior (i.e. they knew that stealing was bad). That doesn't contradict anything, because no information is available on how other juvenile criminals were predisposed.

In other words, a child who knows that stealing is bad might be influenced to steal, become a juvenile criminal and influence another "good boy" to steal.

I think the only possible answer here is (B).
Current Student
User avatar
P
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done!!
Joined: 29 Aug 2012
Posts: 1116
Location: India
WE: General Management (Aerospace and Defense)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Inferrance - A child's conception of whether certain behavio  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Oct 2013, 23:32
Quote:
I think the only possible answer here is (B).[/spoiler]


Hi,

Actually an inference questions is where we have find "What else must be true from the given passage" ...

It may be restatement of the premise. With this i go for D. Which is correctly inferred from the passage.

As far as B is concerned- It is might be true scenario- This statement may be true sometimes, but not always (More like an assumptions)


To make it more clear. Please read this post --http://gmatclub.com/forum/inference-vs-assumption-146758.html .. This may helps you understand :)
_________________

Become a GMAT Club Premium member to avail lot of discounts

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Apr 2012
Posts: 375
Re: Inferrance - A child's conception of whether certain behavio  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2013, 05:55
1
Gnpth wrote:
Quote:
I think the only possible answer here is (B).[/spoiler]


Hi,

Actually an inference questions is where we have find "What else must be true from the given passage" ...

It may be restatement of the premise. With this i go for D. Which is correctly inferred from the passage.

As far as B is concerned- It is might be true scenario- This statement may be true sometimes, but not always (More like an assumptions)


To make it more clear. Please read this post --http://gmatclub.com/forum/inference-vs-assumption-146758.html .. This may helps you understand :)


I am having trouble with D,
B seems a lot more true, as it is written that the behavior can significantly change during the teenage years...
Current Student
User avatar
P
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done!!
Joined: 29 Aug 2012
Posts: 1116
Location: India
WE: General Management (Aerospace and Defense)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Inferrance - A child's conception of whether certain behavio  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2013, 06:57
ronr34 wrote:
I am having trouble with D,
B seems a lot more true, as it is written that the behavior can significantly change during the teenage years...



Hi,

What is actually i understood from both B and D.

B. we cannot predict that child whether he will be criminal when he becomes adult untill he turns to his teenage.

It is more like an assumptions. It may be true or may not be, He can be a normal child during his childhood days but a criminal now.

D. The fact that Adult criminal most likely has been exposed to criminal behavior during the child.

It is more like a re-statement of the final lines in passage.

Quote:
the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers and associated primarily with other teenagers who later became adult criminals


This doesn't say all adult criminals but majority of them, thats what option D also states. This is what i think.
_________________

Become a GMAT Club Premium member to avail lot of discounts

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 27 Oct 2013
Posts: 4
Re: Inferrance - A child's conception of whether certain behavio  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2013, 07:06
Gnpth wrote:
ronr34 wrote:
I am having trouble with D,
B seems a lot more true, as it is written that the behavior can significantly change during the teenage years...



Hi,

What is actually i understood from both B and D.

B. we cannot predict that child whether he will be criminal when he becomes adult untill he turns to his teenage.

It is more like an assumptions. It may be true or may not be, He can be a normal child during his childhood days but a criminal now.


It's not an assumption. It follows from the premise that regardless of pre-teen pre-disposition, the teenager can turn either way. It does not add new information to be an assumption.

Gnpth wrote:
D. The fact that Adult criminal most likely has been exposed to criminal behavior during the child.

It is more like a re-statement of the final lines in passage.

Quote:
the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers and associated primarily with other teenagers who later became adult criminals


This doesn't say all adult criminals but majority of them, thats what option D also states. This is what i think.


(D) would have been a restatement if it said: "[D] An adult criminal is likely to have been predisposed as a child to criminal behavior. a criminal teenager". Instead it states that those children with pre-disposition (according to the passage, it means "conception of right and wrong") are more likely to become teenage criminals. This is new information which we were not given, so it can't be inferred.
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 06 Sep 2013
Posts: 1765
Concentration: Finance
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 May 2014, 08:02
Can we have an expert kindly review this one and tell us the difference between A and D here?

Honestly, I went for A cause D didn't make much of a sense to me. It is not necessary that it will be that way. But anyways, just to check

Cheers!
J :)
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: PLAY HARD OR GO HOME
Joined: 25 Feb 2014
Posts: 150
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Finance
Schools: Mannheim
GMAT 1: 560 Q46 V22
GPA: 3.1
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Jul 2014, 12:10
jlgdr wrote:
Can we have an expert kindly review this one and tell us the difference between A and D here?

Honestly, I went for A cause D didn't make much of a sense to me. It is not necessary that it will be that way. But anyways, just to check

Cheers!
J :)


HELLO FRIEND..!
I thoroughly agree with u..although a child may b xposed to crim. bhaviour,wat if he has a very good company in teenage ..he will most probably mimic him and may not end upp being a criminal...whereas,in A..watever the experience tht child may have,he mostly b inclined to mimic his peers...wat say...!?
_________________

ITS NOT OVER , UNTIL I WIN ! I CAN, AND I WILL .PERIOD.

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 09 Mar 2013
Posts: 18
Location: Russian Federation
Concentration: General Management, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 550 Q43 V23
GMAT 2: 590 Q49 V22
GMAT 3: 690 Q49 V34
GMAT 4: 740 Q49 V41
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Dec 2014, 21:47
2
Let's see at the two main contenders here, A & D.

What does A say?
[A] A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong can change during the child's teenage years.
Does any sentence in the premise say or imply that a conception can change? No. The premise only says that a behavior, not a conception, is regularly influenced when a child sees how his peers commit crimes. In other words, a teenager who is predisposed to crimes can also commit a crime with higher probability. However it's not necessarily that he doesn't think such a behavior is bad. His behavior doesn't deny the fact that he has the same conception as he had when he was 10.

On the other hand the premise also says that "...the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers..."
This is exactly what D paraphrases.
[D] An adult criminal is likely to have been predisposed as a child to criminal behavior.
All we need is to presume that a child is not necessarily a person under 10, but also a teenager.

This is my first explanation. Don't judge me strictly :wink:
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 30 Dec 2017
Posts: 4
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Jan 2018, 05:18
vards wrote:
jlgdr wrote:
Can we have an expert kindly review this one and tell us the difference between A and D here?

Honestly, I went for A cause D didn't make much of a sense to me. It is not necessary that it will be that way. But anyways, just to check

Cheers!
J :)


HELLO FRIEND..!
I thoroughly agree with u..although a child may b xposed to crim. bhaviour,wat if he has a very good company in teenage ..he will most probably mimic him and may not end upp being a criminal...whereas,in A..watever the experience tht child may have,he mostly b inclined to mimic his peers...wat say...!?



Yes option A seems more relevant


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Sep 2016
Posts: 320
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Apr 2018, 21:08
Hello experts, Please shed some light on the correct answer choice.

I chose A. My reasoning- The teenagers have a significant influence on whether the person later acts in accordance with his predisposition. teenagers mimic their peer's behavior.

choice A states - His conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong CAN CHANGE ( not will change) during child's teenage years.

The CAN CHANGE verb allows the possibilty for no change too. Then how is it wrong.

Please explain why A is wrong.
Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 09 Mar 2016
Posts: 956
A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Apr 2018, 05:23
garazhaka wrote:
A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong, referred to as "behavioral pre-disposition," is fully developed by the age of 10. During a person's teenage years, other teenagers with whom the person associates regularly have a significant influence on whether the person later acts in accordance with his or her predisposition. In other words, teenagers tend to mimic their peers' behavior. It is interesting to note that the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers and associated primarily with other teenagers who later became adult criminals.

Which of the following conclusions can most properly be drawn from the information above?

[A] A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong can change during the child's teenage years.
Until a child becomes a teenager it is impossible to predict whether the child will eventually become an adult criminal.
[C] Law-abiding adults are unlikely to have developed a predisposition for adult criminal behavior.
[D] An adult criminal is likely to have been predisposed as a child to criminal behavior.
[E] Pre-teen children who are not predisposed to criminal behavior are unlikely to become adult criminals.

Am I wrong or is the OA wrong? Please help.

[Source: Peterson's, Master the GMAT 2013]

Official answer is D. The official explanation is as follows:

Based on the last sentence of the passage, we can conclude that juvenile criminals associate primarily with other juvenile criminals, and that adult criminals constitute the same group of people who were juvenile criminals. For choice (D) to not be readily inferable would require most adult criminals associate primarily with law-abiding peers as teenagers. But this contradicts what we know about adult criminals, based on the passage information. Thus, choice (D) is strongly inferable.

I find some of the reasoning here flawed. Juvenile criminals do associate with other juvenile criminals, BUT juvenile criminals might have had acted for or against their pre-teen conception of right and wrong. But (D) claims that they were predisposed. Or, to flip it around (as the OA does): for choice (D) to not be readily inferable would require adult criminals associate primarily with teenagers who had the correct conception of what constitutes a bad behavior (i.e. they knew that stealing was bad). That doesn't contradict anything, because no information is available on how other juvenile criminals were predisposed.

In other words, a child who knows that stealing is bad might be influenced to steal, become a juvenile criminal and influence another "good boy" to steal.

I think the only possible answer here is (B).



Hello friends :)

sinnce I have chosen answer D let me explain my reasoning.

here is conclusion:

It is interesting to note that the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers and associated primarily with other teenagers who later became adult criminals.

so you need to concentrate on conclusion - some trigger/indirrect key words in this question are as folows:

-the vast majority
- adult criminals


because question revolves around conclusion --- > Which of the following conclusions can most properly be drawn from the information above?

[b][A] A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong can change during the child's teenage years.

A option is totally wrong, because:
it concentrates on whole argument, and we need to concentrate on conclusion - in other words last sentence which puts emphasis on "vast majority od adult crimanals"


Until a child becomes a teenager it is impossible to predict whether the child will eventually become an adult criminal.

B option talks about prediction wether a child will become criminal adult or not, BUT conclusions main point is not a prediction BUT a FACT that vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers. So Option B, is out. we arlready know this.

[C] Law-abiding adults are unlikely to have developed a predisposition for adult criminal behavior.

C option talks about Law abiding adults which is irrelevant, and nowhere it is mentioned the word "law" Hence it is out .

[D] An adult criminal is likely to have been predisposed as a child to criminal behavior.

D option is correct Why ?

because, dont forget you need to concentrate on conclusion --
Conclusion says: It is interesting to note that the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers and associated primarily with other teenagers who later became adult criminals.



[E] Pre-teen children who are not predisposed to criminal behavior are unlikely to become adult criminals.

Option E wants to confuse you :) but if you read carefully you will understand that it is total nonsence :) We never know that [b]pre-teen children who are not predisposed to criminal behavior are unlikely to become adult criminals. you cant be sure of this because you dont have this information. hence it it out

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 11
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Apr 2018, 20:32
In the last line of argument, the word 'teenage' is used.

In option D, the word 'child' is used.

Is there some disconnection here?

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Sep 2017
Posts: 36
WE: Account Management (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Apr 2018, 20:56
[quote="garazhaka"]A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong, referred to as "behavioral pre-disposition," is fully developed by the age of 10. During a person's teenage years, other teenagers with whom the person associates regularly have a significant influence on whether the person later acts in accordance with his or her predisposition. In other words, teenagers tend to mimic their peers' behavior. It is interesting to note that the vast majority of adult criminals also committed crimes as teenagers and associated primarily with other teenagers who later became adult criminals.

Which of the following conclusions can most properly be drawn from the information above?

[A] A child's conception of whether certain behavior is right or wrong can change during the child's teenage years. Out of scope
[B] Until a child becomes a teenager it is impossible to predict whether the child will eventually become an adult criminal.—out of scope
[C] Law-abiding adults are unlikely to have developed a predisposition for adult criminal behavior.—Not mentioned in the passage
[D] An adult criminal is likely to have been predisposed as a child to criminal behavior. — in-line with our prethinking— correct
[E] Pre-teen children who are not predisposed to criminal behavior are unlikely to become adult criminals.— not mentioned in passage—irrelevant

Am I wrong or is the OA wrong? Please help.



Premise: right/wrong decision concious — 10yr old
Teenage—peers affect behaviour—mimic other teens’ behaviour
Adult criminals today also committed crimes as teenage and so did other adult criminals whom they grew up with

Prethinking: teenage peers play a major role in deciding how a person is going to turn out as an adult.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: A child's conception of whether certain behavior &nbs [#permalink] 15 Apr 2018, 20:56
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A child's conception of whether certain behavior

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.