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A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If

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A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If the cost of each shovel was $14 and the cost of each rakes was $9, what was the total cost of the shovels and rakes purchased by the store?

(1) The ratio of the number of shovels to the number of rakes purchased by the store was 2 to 3
(2) The total number of shovels and rakes purchased by the store was 50.

Originally posted by blog on 31 Jan 2008, 20:12.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Jun 2019, 02:47, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic.
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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2008, 21:53
blog wrote:
A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If the cost of each shovel was $14 and the cost of each rakes was $9, what was the total cost of the shovels and rakes purchased by the store?

1. The ratio of the number of shovels to the number of rakes purchased by the store was 2 to 3
2. The total number of shovels and rakes purchased by the store was 50.


1: ratio of 2/3 no help here we could have an infinite amount of rakes and shovels so long as the ratio is 2/3

2: We don't know how many rakes were bought or how many shovels, the price would be different.

5x=50 x=10 so 2(14)+3(9) --> 28+27 = 55$*10 --> 550$.


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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2008, 07:32
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GMATBLACKBELT wrote:
blog wrote:
A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If the cost of each shovel was $14 and the cost of each rakes was $9, what was the total cost of the shovels and rakes purchased by the store?

1. The ratio of the number of shovels to the number of rakes purchased by the store was 2 to 3
2. The total number of shovels and rakes purchased by the store was 50.


1: ratio of 2/3 no help here we could have an infinite amount of rakes and shovels so long as the ratio is 2/3

2: We don't know how many rakes were bought or how many shovels, the price would be different.

5x=50 x=10 so 2(14)+3(9) --> 28+27 = 55$*10 --> 550$.


C


i made the very silly mistake of thinking that the ratio by itself was enough. note to self: you need absolute numbers for things like this because the numbers can be very different but still maintain the same ratio.
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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2013, 05:56
isn't A sufficient for this question/

9X + 14Y / X + Y we have to find this out given X / Y = 2/3
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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2013, 07:24
fozzzy wrote:
A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If the cost of each shovel was $14 and the cost of each rakes was $9, what was the total cost of the shovels and rakes purchased by the store?

(1) The ratio of the number of shovels to the number of rakes purchased by the store was 2 to 3
(2) The total number of shovels and rakes purchased by the store was 50.

isn't A sufficient for this question/

9X + 14Y / X + Y we have to find this out given X / Y = 2/3


Consider this:

If shovels=2 and rakes=3, then the total cost is 2*14+3*9.
If shovels=4 and rakes=6, then the total cost is 4*14+6*9.

So, the first statement is not sufficient.

Hope it's clear.
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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2015, 21:50
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Hi All,

Questions on the GMAT are always carefully worded, so you have to respect that level of detail and do the necessary work to get the answer to the question THAT IS ASKED. In DS questions, even with the same information, a difference in the wording of the question can lead to a different correct answer.

Here, we're given the price of each shovel ($14) and each rake ($9) and we're asked for the TOTAL COST of ALL the shovels and rakes purchased in the store.

To figure out TOTAL COST, we need to know the number of shovels and the number of rakes.

The math involved in solving this problem has already been explained by gmatblackbelt, so I won't rehash that here. Instead, consider how the answer changes when I just change the question.

What if the prompt asked: "Is the total cost of the shovels greater than the total cost of the rakes?" (Hint: the answer would NOT be C).
How about if it asked: "Is the combined cost of the shovels and rakes greater than $100?" (Hint: the answer is also NOT C.)

The math involved in most DS questions is not difficult, which is why DS questions aren't really there to test math skills. DS questions test you on a number of other skills that matter though, including organization, accuracy, attention-to-detail, thoroughness, the ability to PROVE that you've correct, etc. Don't let pride get in the way of picking up easy points on the GMAT - take the notes, do the necessary work and you can pick up all of these easy points.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich
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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2017, 23:41
EMPOWERgmatRichC wrote:
Hi All,

Questions on the GMAT are always carefully worded, so you have to respect that level of detail and do the necessary work to get the answer to the question THAT IS ASKED. In DS questions, even with the same information, a difference in the wording of the question can lead to a different correct answer.

Here, we're given the price of each shovel ($14) and each rake ($9) and we're asked for the TOTAL COST of ALL the shovels and rakes purchased in the store.

To figure out TOTAL COST, we need to know the number of shovels and the number of rakes.

The math involved in solving this problem has already been explained by gmatblackbelt, so I won't rehash that here. Instead, consider how the answer changes when I just change the question.

What if the prompt asked: "Is the total cost of the shovels greater than the total cost of the rakes?" (Hint: the answer would NOT be C).
How about if it asked: "Is the combined cost of the shovels and rakes greater than $100?" (Hint: the answer is also NOT C.)

The math involved in most DS questions is not difficult, which is why DS questions aren't really there to test math skills. DS questions test you on a number of other skills that matter though, including organization, accuracy, attention-to-detail, thoroughness, the ability to PROVE that you've correct, etc. Don't let pride get in the way of picking up easy points on the GMAT - take the notes, do the necessary work and you can pick up all of these easy points.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich



Great Insight Rich...
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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2018, 05:18
I have question. What is GMAT trying to testing through such a simple question? My problem is, when I take my mocks, I waste time thinking if there's something I'm missing because the answer can't be this easy. Anyone else who feels the same? Or, any am I approaching this all wrong?
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Re: A garden store purchased a number of shovels and a number of rakes. If   [#permalink] 03 Sep 2018, 05:18
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