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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people

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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2007, 21:10
2
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A
B
C
D
E

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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.

(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.

(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.

(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

Choice A, the best answer, indicates that younger children might be unable to tell whether the harm in the stories was produced intentionally. Thus, even if younger children do regard people’s intentions as relevant, they might be unable to apply this criterion here. Therefore, A undermines the conclusion’s support.

Choices B and E support the conclusion by suggesting that another factor — severity of harm — either possibly (choice B) or actually (choice E) motivated variations in the punishments assigned by younger children. Neither choice C nor choice D affects the conclusion. The conclusion concerns what children recognize about others’ behavior, not children’s own behavior (choice C). The similarity between older children’s and adult’s assignments (choice D) leaves open the question of why younger children’s assignments differed.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 14 Jan 2007, 23:17
1
AK47 wrote:
A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.
Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?
(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.
(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.
(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.
(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.


One way to weaken the argument is to establish that the young children were not able(mature enough) to understand/establish the intentions of the person who did the harm.

A provides a possibility for this scenario.
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Originally posted by ncp on 14 Jan 2007, 22:41.
Last edited by ncp on 14 Jan 2007, 23:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2007, 23:03
For some reason I find all answer choices out of scope except A

Thus, I go with A
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2007, 11:19
AK47 wrote:
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

Yes. The Arg concludes that younger children do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment. And that is what they base punishment on. However, if there was another factor contributing to their assigning punishment the arg would be weakened. Such as, the crimes done intentionally happened to also cause more severe harm. This could be the base of their judgement

(A) how they determined intentional/accident is irrelevant
(B) close but doesn’t say children regarded this highly.
(C) irrelevant
(D) older children compared to adults is irrelevant
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2007, 12:30
E says severity of harm considered
i.e. not intentions, supports conclusion

A it is
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2008, 13:19
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1
A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.
(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.
(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.
(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2008, 14:42
I would choose A. Since this options states that: listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally, and since younger children are not likely to have that skill developed, the argument that ''Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment'' is seriously weaken by the above conclusion.

What is the OA?

ttram wrote:
Please help me to explain this sentence:

A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.
(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.
(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.
(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2008, 15:25
JCLEONES wrote:
I would choose A. Since this options states that: listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally, and since younger children are not likely to have that skill developed, the argument that ''Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment'' is seriously weaken by the above conclusion.

What is the OA?

ttram wrote:
Please help me to explain this sentence:

A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.
(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.
(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.
(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

A is an answer. However, I still do not understand a little bit.

The premise says that "the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally".
The conclusion is that "Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment."

Thus, if A is right, it weakens the premise, not the conclusion. What is the point here? We should pick the answer which weakens the premise, or the conclusion? Please help me to explain, thanks.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2008, 07:29
pmenon wrote:
whats the deal with A ? It seems to contradict the conclusion



Well A is the right answer... and its simple why?

If the children are not able to ( not mature enough to ) interpret whether the crime was done intentionally or unintentionally then can't judge it on the basis of interpreation. therefore the conclusion that for younger children intention doesn't matter is untrue..
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2008, 09:58
Agreed, A it is.

it is supposed to contradict the conclusion because it weakens it the most, and weakening is the type of the question asked.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2011, 11:45
the source is OG10.

A weakens the conclusion by saying that younger children do not posses mature sense to determine whether the harm was produced intentionally or not.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2011, 22:28
Between A and D, A actually strengthens the conclusion.

D is the best.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2011, 10:38
D cannot be the answer as it talks about the older children...the argument talks about the younger ones.
At first read I was confused with the answer, but I was able to eliminate B, D and E.
Between A and C...C didn't make any sense... and I selected A as answer.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2012, 02:27
AimHigher wrote:
E says severity of harm considered
i.e. not intentions, supports conclusion

A it is


Yup so essentially E- gives an other reason that why young kiddos did so and so... but not the intentions bit so this choice kind of strengthen rather than weaken. working backward I could go to A. As other options do not seems viable enough.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2012, 01:05
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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.

(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.

(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.

(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2012, 02:48
PUNEETSCHDV wrote:
A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.
Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?
(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.
(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.
(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.
(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.


A is the correct answer here. The conclusion of the passage is that Young ChildrenE - awarded the punishment irrespective of weather the harm was done intentionally or accidentally unlike older children.
Stament A : Per this statement the listeners (both young and older) had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally which means both young and older were not able to percive correctly whether harm was done intentially or was accidental and thus it weakens the argument.
B - Talks about Severity. Not relevant
C -
D - talks about older children - Irrelevant
E - Again talks about Severity - Not Relevant
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 10 Dec 2012, 13:37
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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.

(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.

(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.

(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories
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Originally posted by carcass on 10 Dec 2012, 07:57.
Last edited by carcass on 10 Dec 2012, 13:37, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2012, 08:29
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Answer must be A.
D and E strengthen the argument.
A presents an alternate reason why the group of children gave random punishments. If it needs a high level of intellect to choose respective punishments, then the children were not capable enough to do so. We can't say that younger children do not regard people's intentions relevant to punishment. In other words A is an alternate cause.
C and B are nor relevant.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2012, 08:33
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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.


I got A by POE

E is the trap answer
The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

we don't know the severity of the harm done we only have 2 options intentionally or accidentally.

Also if you use !A > B
if we negate A we can arrive at B

In interpreting these stories, the listeners had NOT drawn on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally

what happens if they are mature then they can use that as a basis for punishment.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2012, 13:37
Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people   [#permalink] 10 Dec 2012, 13:37

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