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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people

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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 12 Sep 2018, 23:52
7
13
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

62% (01:47) correct 38% (02:00) wrong based on 407 sessions

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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.

(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.

(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.

(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

Choice A, the best answer, indicates that younger children might be unable to tell whether the harm in the stories was produced intentionally. Thus, even if younger children do regard people's intentions as relevant, they might be unable to apply this criterion here. Therefore, A undermines the conclusion's support.

Choices B and E support the conclusion by suggesting that another factor — severity of harm — either possibly (choice B) or actually (choice E) motivated variations in the punishments assigned by younger children. Neither choice C nor choice D affects the conclusion. The conclusion concerns what children recognize about others' behavior, not children's own behavior (choice C). The similarity between older children's and adult's assignments (choice D) leaves open the question of why younger children's assignments differed.

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Originally posted by carcass on 10 Dec 2012, 07:57.
Last edited by hazelnut on 12 Sep 2018, 23:52, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2012, 08:29
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Answer must be A.
D and E strengthen the argument.
A presents an alternate reason why the group of children gave random punishments. If it needs a high level of intellect to choose respective punishments, then the children were not capable enough to do so. We can't say that younger children do not regard people's intentions relevant to punishment. In other words A is an alternate cause.
C and B are nor relevant.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2012, 08:33
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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.


I got A by POE

E is the trap answer
The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

we don't know the severity of the harm done we only have 2 options intentionally or accidentally.

Also if you use !A > B
if we negate A we can arrive at B

In interpreting these stories, the listeners had NOT drawn on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally

what happens if they are mature then they can use that as a basis for punishment.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2013, 23:25
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Hi,

I got a PM to respond to this question. Please find the response below:



Let me know if it helps.

-Rajat
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2013, 07:15
egmat wrote:
Hi,

I got a PM to respond to this question. Please find the response below:



Let me know if it helps.

-Rajat


I too marked A, But i am unable to rule out E. Can you please explain how you ruled out E?

My reasoning for E is

When the younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories then the Younger children regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment. so it might weaken the conclusion

Please correct me if i am wrong
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2013, 10:35
Quote:
My reasoning for E is

When the younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories then the Younger children regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment. so it might weaken the conclusion

Please correct me if i am wrong


There is no relationship between severity of harm and intention. Lets say I hit someone while driving my car at 70 mph. The severity of harm would be the same whether I hit the person intentionally or by accident. Since there is no relationship between severity of harm in intention, this choice is OFS (out of scope)

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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2014, 21:46
Marcab wrote:
Answer must be A.
D and E strengthen the argument.
A presents an alternate reason why the group of children gave random punishments. If it needs a high level of intellect to choose respective punishments, then the children were not capable enough to do so. We can't say that younger children do not regard people's intentions relevant to punishment. In other words A is an alternate cause.
C and B are nor relevant.


Hi Marcab,
Can u please elaborate a lil more on A is weakening.What I can make out of it is that A says that since a high level of intellect is needed, younger kids are unable to decide on punishment, hence its supporting the argument! Please guide.
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2014, 04:04
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maggie27 wrote:
Marcab wrote:
Answer must be A.
D and E strengthen the argument.
A presents an alternate reason why the group of children gave random punishments. If it needs a high level of intellect to choose respective punishments, then the children were not capable enough to do so. We can't say that younger children do not regard people's intentions relevant to punishment. In other words A is an alternate cause.
C and B are nor relevant.


Hi Marcab,
Can u please elaborate a lil more on A is weakening.What I can make out of it is that A says that since a high level of intellect is needed, younger kids are unable to decide on punishment, hence its supporting the argument! Please guide.



A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.

Premise: Children read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally.When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones
Conclusion: Younger children do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.

Quote:
In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

The option states that to interpret these stories, listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.Maturity comes with a age and children might not be mature enough to interpret these stories.

This undermines the conclusion because children didn't disregard the intentions in fact they couldn't understand the intentions of people i.e whether ppl did crimes intentionally or accidentally.


press kudos if it helps
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2014, 10:13
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carcass wrote:
A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to punishment.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.

Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.

The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.

The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.



Good Question+1
Gmatprep questions are just awesome...

Clearly this is a Weaken question and the conclusion is that Younger children do not consider intent (whether accidental or intentional) of people while deciding a punishment..and why is that? Because the study showed that Younger people gave same punishment whether person's intent was accidental or intentional..

Gap in Logic : Younger children do not regard intent of the people (In Conclusion) where as facts presented tells about same punishment was given by younger people..irrespective of intent

A gives you the logic that it is not that younger children do not consider intent of the doer but just that they don't have enough knowledge to differentiate between harm produced intentionally or accidentally.. and thus an alternate reason for giving the same punishment..

For a weaken question...always consider the argument to be weak(When you are reading) and before going to answer try come with an answer on your own...Picking the correct answer choice becomes easier thereafter...
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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people  [#permalink]

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Re: A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people &nbs [#permalink] 02 Jul 2018, 11:15
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