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A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has

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Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2016, 11:44
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
sun01 wrote:
The argument also assumes that musicologist also knows about much of sugg's work and its style.

In light of this assumption, option D can also be a weakener.

Please correct my reasoning


No, it doesn't. Look at the argument again:

"The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers."

The argument doesn't say that the musicologist believes that the phrasing is similar to Suggs'... It says that the musicologist believes it is written by Suggs because the phrasing IS typical of Suggs' work. So it is given to be true that the phrasing is typical of Suggs' work.

Also note that (D) says "The musicologist is not familiar with ALL of Suggs' music."
This doesn't make a very strong case against the musicologist's knowledge. He may not know ALL of Suggs' work but he may know most of it. He may still be considered an expert.


Please if you can elaborate on D. I am not sure why D cannot be the answer. If the musicologist is not aware of ALL of Sugg's music, isn't the conclusion weakened. How can musicologist comment that the work is typical of Sugg's when he himself is not aware of ALL of Sugg's music? May be he makes a comment of what part of Sugg's music he knows about, thereby weakening the force behind the conclusion.

VeritasPrepKarishma please help. I don't get this at all.

Thank you.
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Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2016, 10:15
1
Keats wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
sun01 wrote:
The argument also assumes that musicologist also knows about much of sugg's work and its style.

In light of this assumption, option D can also be a weakener.

Please correct my reasoning


No, it doesn't. Look at the argument again:

"The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers."

The argument doesn't say that the musicologist believes that the phrasing is similar to Suggs'... It says that the musicologist believes it is written by Suggs because the phrasing IS typical of Suggs' work. So it is given to be true that the phrasing is typical of Suggs' work.

Also note that (D) says "The musicologist is not familiar with ALL of Suggs' music."
This doesn't make a very strong case against the musicologist's knowledge. He may not know ALL of Suggs' work but he may know most of it. He may still be considered an expert.


Please if you can elaborate on D. I am not sure why D cannot be the answer. If the musicologist is not aware of ALL of Sugg's music, isn't the conclusion weakened. How can musicologist comment that the work is typical of Sugg's when he himself is not aware of ALL of Sugg's music? May be he makes a comment of what part of Sugg's music he knows about, thereby weakening the force behind the conclusion.

VeritasPrepKarishma please help. I don't get this at all.

Thank you.


Option D implies that the musicologist is not aware of certain works of Suggs that may or may not match with the song in question. It actually does not matter whether that unknown part of Suggs' work matches with the song - the fact that the musicologist already found similarity with the part of Suggs' work that he knows is not weakened by the dissimilarity (if at all there is) of the unknown part, given that such a song is atypical of other composers.
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Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2017, 18:21
The discussion above about harmony doesn't seem to capture the logical reason answer C is not correct. It's not the case that harmony is 'irrelevant' here. Harmony could be very relevant, if harmony gave us some reason to think Suggs did not write the song. But that's not what we get from answer C. We have this argument, paraphrasing:

- the melodies in the song are similar to Suggs' melodies, but are not similar to other contemporaneous writers' melodies
- therefore Suggs probably wrote the song

We want to weaken this argument.

Answer C says, paraphrasing: 'the harmonies in the song are similar to Suggs' harmonies (and are similar to other writers' harmonies too)'

How could that possibly weaken the argument? We learn that the harmonies could very well have been written by Suggs. The information is perfectly consistent with the hypothesis that Suggs wrote the song. At worst, this information is neutral (I'd say it slightly strengthens the argument). If you wanted to weaken the argument, you'd instead want a statement like this:

'the harmonies in the song are different from any harmonies Suggs used in other songs'

Then you'd have a reason to think Suggs did not write the song - this would be a clear weakener, and would be the right answer choice if it were there.

Note that you don't even need to know what harmony is to see that C is wrong. The logical point is that you never weaken a hypothesis by finding information perfectly consistent with that hypothesis.
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Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

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New post 21 Nov 2017, 11:39
A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has come across a song published in the early 17th century that he believes was composed by the songwriter John Suggs (1619 - 1670), though Suggs' name is not given on the song sheet. The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers.

Which of the following, if true, would weaken the argument made by the musicologist?

Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers. -Correct. The musicologist took into account only 17 century musicians.
Publishers in the 17th century sometimes did not properly credit the composers of the songs they published. -We already have an unnamed song with us. Irrelevant at best.
The harmonies of the song are consistent with those used by Suggs and other 17th century songwriters. -We already know from the argument that Sugg's and other musicians' harmonies didn't match with those of this song. Incorrect.
The musicologist is not familiar with all of Suggs' music. -No one can be an absolute god who knows everything. Even if a person doesn't know everything about other person, the person can comment on other person's characteristics.
Several 18th century composers were deeply influenced by Suggs' melodic phrasing. -Out of scope
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Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2018, 05:24
JarvisR wrote:
A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has come across a song published in the early 17th century that he believes was composed by the songwriter John Suggs (1619 - 1670), though Suggs' name is not given on the song sheet. The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers.

Which of the following, if true, would weaken the argument made by the musicologist?

A. Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers.

B. Publishers in the 17th century sometimes did not properly credit the composers of the songs they published.

C. The harmonies of the song are consistent with those used by Suggs and other 17th century songwriters.

D. The musicologist is not familiar with all of Suggs' music.

E. Several 18th century composers were deeply influenced by Suggs' melodic phrasing.


VERITAS PREP OFFICIAL SOLUTION:



Correct Answer: A

The argument concludes that Suggs wrote the song. If, as choice A says, most songs published in the 17th century were composed by 16th century composers, this leaves open the possibility that this song was written by a 16th century composer whose melodic phrasing might have been very similar to Suggs', thereby weakening the argument. Choice B does not tell us whether Suggs wrote or didn't write this song. Choice C is incorrect because we're only interested in the melodic phrasing, not the harmonies. For answer D, it doesn't matter that the musicologist doesn't know all of Suggs' music. And in answer choice E, the 18th century is after the fact, and thus irrelevant. We are told that this song was published in the 17th century.
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Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has   [#permalink] 02 Jun 2018, 05:24

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