It is currently 15 Dec 2017, 04:29

Decision(s) Day!:

CHAT Rooms | Wharton R1 | Stanford R1 | Tuck R1 | Ross R1 | Haas R1 | UCLA R1


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

2 KUDOS received
Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 05 Nov 2012
Posts: 529

Kudos [?]: 669 [2], given: 606

Concentration: Technology, Other
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Sep 2014, 04:38
2
This post received
KUDOS
20
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

55% (01:14) correct 45% (01:34) wrong based on 919 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has come across a song published in the early 17th century that he believes was composed by the songwriter John Suggs (1619 - 1670), though Suggs' name is not given on the song sheet. The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers.

Which of the following, if true, would weaken the argument made by the musicologist?

Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers.
Publishers in the 17th century sometimes did not properly credit the composers of the songs they published.
The harmonies of the song are consistent with those used by Suggs and other 17th century songwriters.
The musicologist is not familiar with all of Suggs' music.
Several 18th century composers were deeply influenced by Suggs' melodic phrasing.

Lets discuss the reasoning for the provides choices.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

--------------------------------------------------------
Regards :)

Kudos [?]: 669 [2], given: 606

Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jul 2013
Posts: 92

Kudos [?]: 220 [0], given: 14

Schools: ISB '17 (A), IIMC (A)
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V32
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2014, 05:57
None of the options (including the correct one) makes sense to me.
A says "Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers." Doesn't it actually strengthen the argument that as Suggs also belonged to 16th century, he might have actually written it?
_________________

Sometimes standing still can be, the best move you ever make......

Kudos [?]: 220 [0], given: 14

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Sep 2014
Posts: 18

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2014, 15:46
A:Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers.
" atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers"...so these songs might have been written by composers in 16th Century that can't be use to support his point

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 May 2014
Posts: 94

Kudos [?]: 107 [0], given: 43

Location: India
Concentration: Technology, General Management
Schools: HKUST '15, ISB '15
GMAT Date: 12-26-2014
GPA: 3
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2014, 00:31
aadikamagic wrote:
None of the options (including the correct one) makes sense to me.
A says "Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers." Doesn't it actually strengthen the argument that as Suggs also belonged to 16th century, he might have actually written it?


Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers.
The only reasoning that Author gave is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers.The reasoning can be strengthened only if Suggs work was unique and original i.e not inspired from others. But what if the Sugg work itself was inspired from others and the original work inspired many other composers also ? Then the authors reasoning will fail
_________________

Success has been and continues to be defined as Getting up one more time than you have been knocked down.

Kudos [?]: 107 [0], given: 43

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2013
Posts: 49

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 151

Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2014, 11:14
I choose d - a seems strengthening the argument need expert advice in this......

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 151

Expert Post
6 KUDOS received
GMAT Tutor
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1347

Kudos [?]: 2044 [6], given: 6

Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2014, 13:04
6
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
JarvisR wrote:
A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has come across a song published in the early 17th century that he believes was composed by the songwriter John Suggs (1619 - 1670), though Suggs' name is not given on the song sheet. The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers.
Which of the following, if true, would weaken the argument made by the musicologist?
Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers.


The musicologist argues as follows:

- The song is typical of Suggs.
- The song is unlike the songs of other 17th century composers
- Therefore the song is by Suggs

The musicologist has only considered the possibility that the song was written by a composer working in the 17th century. If instead the song might have been written in the 16th century, but published much later (in the 17th century), then perhaps the song is not by Suggs at all. That's why A is correct here.
_________________

GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com

Kudos [?]: 2044 [6], given: 6

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2013
Posts: 49

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 151

A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2014, 16:25
Sir

I am still not understanding why is A correct here- as arguments clearly mention - PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY, REASON OF BELIEF MELODY OF SNUGGS WORK BUT ATYPICAL OF OTHER 17TH CENTURY COMPOSER.
SO OPTION CONFIRMS THAT - SONG PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY WERE COMPOSED IN 16TH CENTURY Therefore it could be composed by SNUGG.

Is extreme word MANY and 16th cnetury composers - generalizing the point made in the argument -stating it can be any composed by any 16th century composer and not certainly snugg.

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 151

Expert Post
10 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 7800

Kudos [?]: 18133 [10], given: 236

Location: Pune, India
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2014, 21:58
10
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
3
This post was
BOOKMARKED
taleesh wrote:
Sir

I am still not understanding why is A correct here- as arguments clearly mention - PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY, REASON OF BELIEF MELODY OF SNUGGS WORK BUT ATYPICAL OF OTHER 17TH CENTURY COMPOSER.
SO OPTION CONFIRMS THAT - SONG PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY WERE COMPOSED IN 16TH CENTURY Therefore it could be composed by SNUGG.

Is extreme word MANY and 16th cnetury composers - generalizing the point made in the argument -stating it can be any composed by any 16th century composer and not certainly snugg.


Responding to a pm:

I think this is where you are lost:

17th century means the 1600s (1601 to 1700). Suggs lived in the 17th century (1619 - 1670)
16th century means the 1500s.

Since the song was published in the 17th century, the author is assuming that it was written in the 17th century (by Suggs). It is possible that the song was written in the previous century by someone else but published much later. So option (A) weakens our argument that the song was written by Suggs.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Kudos [?]: 18133 [10], given: 236

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 May 2014
Posts: 94

Kudos [?]: 107 [1], given: 43

Location: India
Concentration: Technology, General Management
Schools: HKUST '15, ISB '15
GMAT Date: 12-26-2014
GPA: 3
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2014, 22:01
1
This post received
KUDOS
taleesh wrote:
Sir

I am still not understanding why is A correct here- as arguments clearly mention - PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY, REASON OF BELIEF MELODY OF SNUGGS WORK BUT ATYPICAL OF OTHER 17TH CENTURY COMPOSER.
SO OPTION CONFIRMS THAT - SONG PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY WERE COMPOSED IN 16TH CENTURY Therefore it could be composed by SNUGG.

Is extreme word MANY and 16th cnetury composers - generalizing the point made in the argument -stating it can be any composed by any 16th century composer and not certainly snugg.


Argument :
A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has come across a song published in the early 17th century that he believes was composed by the songwriter John Suggs (1619 - 1670),

As mentioned in the question stem , John Suggs lived 1619 - 1670. 16xx is actually 17th century.So, John was born in early 17th century and cannot be a 16th century composer.

Why A is correct :
Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers.
The only reasoning that Author gave is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers.The reasoning can be strengthened only if Suggs work was unique and original i.e not inspired from others. But what if the Sugg work itself was inspired from others and the original work inspired many other composers also ? Then the authors reasoning will fail
_________________

Success has been and continues to be defined as Getting up one more time than you have been knocked down.

Kudos [?]: 107 [1], given: 43

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2013
Posts: 49

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 151

Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2014, 09:19
Thank you very much for Veritasprepkarishma and Varun Bhardwaj - for clarifying my doubt.

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 151

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10203

Kudos [?]: 277 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2016, 08:05
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 277 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 15 May 2010
Posts: 188

Kudos [?]: 35 [0], given: 65

Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
WE: Engineering (Manufacturing)
Reviews Badge
A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jan 2016, 01:00
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
taleesh wrote:
Sir

I am still not understanding why is A correct here- as arguments clearly mention - PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY, REASON OF BELIEF MELODY OF SNUGGS WORK BUT ATYPICAL OF OTHER 17TH CENTURY COMPOSER.
SO OPTION CONFIRMS THAT - SONG PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY WERE COMPOSED IN 16TH CENTURY Therefore it could be composed by SNUGG.

Is extreme word MANY and 16th cnetury composers - generalizing the point made in the argument -stating it can be any composed by any 16th century composer and not certainly snugg.


Responding to a pm:

I think this is where you are lost:

17th century means the 1600s (1601 to 1700). Suggs lived in the 17th century (1619 - 1670)
16th century means the 1500s.

Since the song was published in the 17th century, the author is assuming that it was written in the 17th century (by Suggs). It is possible that the song was written in the previous century by someone else but published much later. So option (A) weakens our argument that the song was written by Suggs.



Teacher,

The argument also assumes that musicologist also knows about much of sugg's work and its style.

In light of this assumption, option D can also be a weakener.

Please correct my reasoning

Kudos [?]: 35 [0], given: 65

Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 7800

Kudos [?]: 18133 [2], given: 236

Location: Pune, India
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jan 2016, 22:46
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
sun01 wrote:
The argument also assumes that musicologist also knows about much of sugg's work and its style.

In light of this assumption, option D can also be a weakener.

Please correct my reasoning


No, it doesn't. Look at the argument again:

"The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers."

The argument doesn't say that the musicologist believes that the phrasing is similar to Suggs'... It says that the musicologist believes it is written by Suggs because the phrasing IS typical of Suggs' work. So it is given to be true that the phrasing is typical of Suggs' work.

Also note that (D) says "The musicologist is not familiar with ALL of Suggs' music."
This doesn't make a very strong case against the musicologist's knowledge. He may not know ALL of Suggs' work but he may know most of it. He may still be considered an expert.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Kudos [?]: 18133 [2], given: 236

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
D
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 5352

Kudos [?]: 6134 [0], given: 121

Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jan 2016, 00:09
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
sun01 wrote:
The argument also assumes that musicologist also knows about much of sugg's work and its style.

In light of this assumption, option D can also be a weakener.

Please correct my reasoning


No, it doesn't. Look at the argument again:

"The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers."

The argument doesn't say that the musicologist believes that the phrasing is similar to Suggs'... It says that the musicologist believes it is written by Suggs because the phrasing IS typical of Suggs' work. So it is given to be true that the phrasing is typical of Suggs' work.

Also note that (D) says "The musicologist is not familiar with ALL of Suggs' music."
This doesn't make a very strong case against the musicologist's knowledge. He may not know ALL of Suggs' work but he may know most of it. He may still be considered an expert.



Hi karishma,
I read the Q first time and was convinced with reasoning for A, so no Questions on that..
But the point which struck me the time was going through the para was word 'EARLY 17th century"...
mr john suggs, a hypothetical name I believe, was born in 1619. Although not specified anywhere about the decades in early , mid and late century, the early part should be first 25-30 years of the century. So, logically, mr john would be only 10-15 years when the poem was published. Wouldn't it be slightly early for him to start publishing/ writing poems.

again its not finding faults, the Q is perfect in reasoning. He could have been born slightly earlier,say 1602 or so, if its a hypothetical name.
_________________

Absolute modulus :http://gmatclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-210849.html#p1622372
Combination of similar and dissimilar things : http://gmatclub.com/forum/topic215915.html

Kudos [?]: 6134 [0], given: 121

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 06 Apr 2012
Posts: 50

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 25

Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jan 2016, 03:03
chetan2u wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
sun01 wrote:
The argument also assumes that musicologist also knows about much of sugg's work and its style.

In light of this assumption, option D can also be a weakener.

Please correct my reasoning


No, it doesn't. Look at the argument again:

"The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers."

The argument doesn't say that the musicologist believes that the phrasing is similar to Suggs'... It says that the musicologist believes it is written by Suggs because the phrasing IS typical of Suggs' work. So it is given to be true that the phrasing is typical of Suggs' work.

Also note that (D) says "The musicologist is not familiar with ALL of Suggs' music."
This doesn't make a very strong case against the musicologist's knowledge. He may not know ALL of Suggs' work but he may know most of it. He may still be considered an expert.



Hi karishma,
I read the Q first time and was convinced with reasoning for A, so no Questions on that..
But the point which struck me the time was going through the para was word 'EARLY 17th century"...
mr john suggs, a hypothetical name I believe, was born in 1619. Although not specified anywhere about the decades in early , mid and late century, the early part should be first 25-30 years of the century. So, logically, mr john would be only 10-15 years when the poem was published. Wouldn't it be slightly early for him to start publishing/ writing poems.

again its not finding faults, the Q is perfect in reasoning. He could have been born slightly earlier,say 1602 or so, if its a hypothetical name.


no i dont think its too early. check this list out - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... _prodigies :shock:

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 25

Expert Post
Director
Director
User avatar
B
Joined: 17 Dec 2012
Posts: 623

Kudos [?]: 548 [0], given: 16

Location: India
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Mar 2016, 19:49
The right choice should say something against the song being typical of Sugg or say something against song being atypical of 17th century songs.

Choice A says songs published in 17th century are composed in 16th century. So song attributed to Sugg is typical of 16th century or in other words 17th century songs.
_________________

Srinivasan Vaidyaraman
Sravna
http://www.sravnatestprep.com/regularcourse.php

Premium Material
Standardized Approaches

Kudos [?]: 548 [0], given: 16

Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1199

Kudos [?]: 907 [0], given: 75

Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 May 2016, 06:39
A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has come across a song published in the early 17th century that he believes was composed by the songwriter John Suggs (1619 - 1670), though Suggs' name is not given on the song sheet. The reason for the musicologist's belief is that the phrasing of the melody is typical of Suggs' work and atypical of songs written by other 17th century composers.

Which of the following, if true, would weaken the argument made by the musicologist?

A. Many songs published in the early 17th century were composed by 16th century composers.......This is the only choice that weakens the argument.
B. Publishers in the 17th century sometimes did not properly credit the composers of the songs they published.........whether they credited or not does no explain why it is Sugg's work or not.
C. The harmonies of the song are consistent with those used by Suggs and other 17th century songwriters.........This is a strengthener. Opposite
D. The musicologist is not familiar with all of Suggs' music...........all plays the spoilsport here driving the choice to extremity.
E. Several 18th century composers were deeply influenced by Suggs' melodic phrasing..........this refers to effect after the publishing the document. OFS
_________________

The only time you can lose is when you give up. Try hard and you will suceed.
Thanks = Kudos. Kudos are appreciated

http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-in-verbal-gmat-forum-134642.html
When you post a question Pls. Provide its source & TAG your questions
Avoid posting from unreliable sources.


My posts
http://gmatclub.com/forum/beauty-of-coordinate-geometry-213760.html#p1649924
http://gmatclub.com/forum/calling-all-march-april-gmat-takers-who-want-to-cross-213154.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/possessive-pronouns-200496.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/double-negatives-206717.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-greatest-integer-function-223595.html#p1721773
https://gmatclub.com/forum/improve-reading-habit-233410.html#p1802265

Kudos [?]: 907 [0], given: 75

2 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Sep 2015
Posts: 109

Kudos [?]: 36 [2], given: 612

GMAT 1: 610 Q43 V31
GMAT 2: 610 Q47 V27
GMAT 3: 650 Q48 V31
GMAT 4: 700 Q49 V35
WE: Project Management (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jul 2016, 23:33
2
This post received
KUDOS
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
taleesh wrote:
Sir

I am still not understanding why is A correct here- as arguments clearly mention - PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY, REASON OF BELIEF MELODY OF SNUGGS WORK BUT ATYPICAL OF OTHER 17TH CENTURY COMPOSER.
SO OPTION CONFIRMS THAT - SONG PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY WERE COMPOSED IN 16TH CENTURY Therefore it could be composed by SNUGG.

Is extreme word MANY and 16th cnetury composers - generalizing the point made in the argument -stating it can be any composed by any 16th century composer and not certainly snugg.


Responding to a pm:

I think this is where you are lost:

17th century means the 1600s (1601 to 1700). Suggs lived in the 17th century (1619 - 1670)
16th century means the 1500s.

Since the song was published in the 17th century, the author is assuming that it was written in the 17th century (by Suggs). It is possible that the song was written in the previous century by someone else but published much later. So option (A) weakens our argument that the song was written by Suggs.


Hi Karishma,

Option A- implies that the song might have been written in another century. but this is not a must.

Notice that option C works on that same logic.

Option C p implies that another parameter that characterize the song is a possible indicator that it has been written by someone else. This is a possible weakener as well since it might weaken the argument.

Hence, i find this question flawed :)

Kudos [?]: 36 [2], given: 612

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Jun 2014
Posts: 56

Kudos [?]: 19 [0], given: 105

Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2016, 22:25
AlexGenkins1234 wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
taleesh wrote:
Sir

I am still not understanding why is A correct here- as arguments clearly mention - PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY, REASON OF BELIEF MELODY OF SNUGGS WORK BUT ATYPICAL OF OTHER 17TH CENTURY COMPOSER.
SO OPTION CONFIRMS THAT - SONG PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY WERE COMPOSED IN 16TH CENTURY Therefore it could be composed by SNUGG.

Is extreme word MANY and 16th cnetury composers - generalizing the point made in the argument -stating it can be any composed by any 16th century composer and not certainly snugg.


Responding to a pm:

I think this is where you are lost:

17th century means the 1600s (1601 to 1700). Suggs lived in the 17th century (1619 - 1670)
16th century means the 1500s.

Since the song was published in the 17th century, the author is assuming that it was written in the 17th century (by Suggs). It is possible that the song was written in the previous century by someone else but published much later. So option (A) weakens our argument that the song was written by Suggs.


Hi Karishma,

Option A- implies that the song might have been written in another century. but this is not a must.

Notice that option C works on that same logic.

Option C p implies that another parameter that characterize the song is a possible indicator that it has been written by someone else. This is a possible weakener as well since it might weaken the argument.

Hence, i find this question flawed :)



Im on the same page as you are. I was thinking and thinking for a long time, and finaly voted for C, because A talks about MANY, and here the assumption is that this particular song is in the group of many, and MANY meanas not "0" or anything from 1 to the end.

at option C it talks particularly about the song in question, here says that the harmonies of the song are consistent with Suggs AND OTHER 17 century songwriter,
so this infact beats the premise that it is typical for songs of other writers. what can be more weakener than to refute the premise.

or bottom line is this question needs revision by the authors.

Kudos [?]: 19 [0], given: 105

Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 7800

Kudos [?]: 18133 [0], given: 236

Location: Pune, India
Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Sep 2016, 00:23
AlexGenkins1234 wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
taleesh wrote:
Sir

I am still not understanding why is A correct here- as arguments clearly mention - PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY, REASON OF BELIEF MELODY OF SNUGGS WORK BUT ATYPICAL OF OTHER 17TH CENTURY COMPOSER.
SO OPTION CONFIRMS THAT - SONG PRODUCED IN 17TH CENTURY WERE COMPOSED IN 16TH CENTURY Therefore it could be composed by SNUGG.

Is extreme word MANY and 16th cnetury composers - generalizing the point made in the argument -stating it can be any composed by any 16th century composer and not certainly snugg.


Responding to a pm:

I think this is where you are lost:

17th century means the 1600s (1601 to 1700). Suggs lived in the 17th century (1619 - 1670)
16th century means the 1500s.

Since the song was published in the 17th century, the author is assuming that it was written in the 17th century (by Suggs). It is possible that the song was written in the previous century by someone else but published much later. So option (A) weakens our argument that the song was written by Suggs.


Hi Karishma,

Option A- implies that the song might have been written in another century. but this is not a must.

Notice that option C works on that same logic.

Option C p implies that another parameter that characterize the song is a possible indicator that it has been written by someone else. This is a possible weakener as well since it might weaken the argument.

Hence, i find this question flawed :)


Note what a typical songwriter does - create lyrics and melody of the song.

(C) The harmonies of the song are consistent with those used by Suggs and other 17th century songwriters.
Option (C) talks about the harmony - the notes that support the melody - of the song. We are not discussing the harmonies, who creates harmonies, which songwriters use which harmonies etc. The argument talks about the songwriters only.

Hence, (C) is irrelevant to our question.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Kudos [?]: 18133 [0], given: 236

Re: A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has   [#permalink] 16 Sep 2016, 00:23

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 35 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

A musicologist doing research in an early music archive in London has

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.