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A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now

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Re: A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2018, 10:15
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kanthaliya

We identify the items compared from the comparison markers such as like, as many as, compared to, etc., Therefore what lies next to the comparatives becomes vital, In E. per se, 'as many as four years ago' is being now compared, The purpose of the question is to compare the number of computers with those four years ago. Can you see the incorrect comparison therein? Many comparison questions involve this trap. You may practice many from Gmatclub by selecting comparison questions.

'Every thirty-two pupils' is plural, unless you say every 'group,' 'batch,' or 'class' of thirty-two people. There is no such collective noun in this case.
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New post 17 Jul 2018, 10:55
daagh wrote:
kanthaliya

We identify the items compared from the comparison markers such as like, as many as, compared to, etc., Therefore what lies next to the comparatives becomes vital, In E. per se, 'as many as four years ago' is being now compared, The purpose of the question is to compare the number of computers with those four years ago. Can you see the incorrect comparison therein? Many comparison questions involve this trap. You may practice many from Gmatclub by selecting comparison questions.

'Every thirty-two pupils' is plural, unless you say every 'group,' 'batch,' or 'class' of thirty-two people. There is no such collective noun in this case.



A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now one microcomputer for every thirty-two pupils, four times as many than there were four years ago. every thirty-two pupils is followed by four time, so cant this four times consider 32 pupils for comparison


'Every thirty-two pupils' is plural, unless you say every 'group,' 'batch,' or 'class' of thirty-two people. There is no such collective noun in this case--> thank you very much. I am now clear with this :-)
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Re: A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2018, 22:51
Hi experts,

I'm still a bit confused about C, for whether “there were” or “there was” is correct.

Does the author try to explain that:
(1) The present ratio (1/32) is four times as that of the past (1/128), or
(2) The present ratio is 1/32, and the total computers now are four times as many as those of the past, no matter what the past ratio was (maybe 1/128, 1/64 or even 1/32)

If (2), “there were” is correct, but it seems a bit unreasonable to give a present ratio first and then compare the present total with the past total;
If (1), should it be “there is now one computer for every 32 pupils” and “there was one computer for every 128 pupils four years ago”, and should the correct sentence be “there is now one computer for every 32 pupils, four times as many as there was four years ago”?

And if we do want to express the (1), is there a better way to explain it more clearly?

Many thanks for your illustrations!

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New post 09 Apr 2019, 11:28
As per my analysis, another reason E is incorrect is that it is ambiguous in terms of meaning.. I think the sentence logically is telling us that the ratio now is 4 times the ratio that was 4 years ago.

As per option E, it is not clear whether the number of computers has increased or the entire ratio/average has improved.

daagh egmat GMATNinja .. correct me if I am wrong

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Re: A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2019, 06:01
Hi Expert,

In choice C, why "there were" not " there was" because the preceding clause is "there is now one ...." ?

Please explain.

Thanks.
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Re: A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2019, 18:05
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ballest127 wrote:
Hi Expert,

In choice C, why "there were" not " there was" because the preceding clause is "there is now one ...." ?

Please explain.

Thanks.

Here's the version created via the use of (C).

A recent national study of the public schools shows that there is now one microcomputer for every thirty-two pupils, four times as many as there were four years ago.

The structure of the sentence is a bit informal. The rationale for the use of the plural "were" in the closing modifier is that "one microcomputer for every thirty-two pupils" is understood to be a plural number of computers.

So essentially this version says

A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now enough computers that there is one microcomputer for every thirty-two pupils, four times as many as there were four years ago.

The sentence version created via the use of (C) is not ideal. It's just much better than the other versions.

One challenge that Sentence Correction question writers face is that of making correct answers not blatantly correct. In order to obscure the correctness of correct answers, Sentence Correction question writers often push, stretch, and even break the boundaries of what constitutes good writing.

In the case of this question, perhaps the writer wanted to make the question at least a little challenging, even though the incorrect answers are pretty blatantly incorrect. So, the writer wrote the correct answer, (C), in a way that could debatably be considered correct, but neither sounds right nor is entirely logical.

Alternatively, the writer may have just decided to be creative with language.

In any case, it's good to be prepared to see some weird and debatably incorrect constructions in the "correct" answers to Sentence Correction questions.
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Re: A recent national study of the public schools shows that there are now   [#permalink] 10 Apr 2019, 18:05

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