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A translation invariably reflects the writing style of the

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A translation invariably reflects the writing style of the  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 02:09
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A translation invariably reflects the writing style of the translator. Sometimes when a long document needs to be translated quickly, several translators are put to work on the job, each assigned to translate part of the document. In these cases, the result is usually a translation marked by different and often incompatible writing styles. Certain computer programs for language translation that work without the intervention of human translation can finish the job faster than human translators and produce a stylistically uniform translation with an 80 percent accuracy rate. Therefore, when a long document needs to be translated quickly, it is better to use a computer translation program than human translators.

Which one of the following issues would be LEAST important to resolve in evaluating the argument?
(A) whether the problem of stylistic variety in human translation could be solved by giving stylistic guidelines to human translators
(B) whether numerical comparisons of the accuracy of translations can reasonably be made
(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style
(D) whether the computer translation contains errors of grammar and usage that drastically alter the meaning of the text
(E) how the accuracy rate of computer translation programs compares with that of human translators in relation to the users’ needs


Dont know why OA is that OA? :-D

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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 02:20
D by POE
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 02:55
IMO B. Using yes-no question technique from power score gmat critical bible

A translation invariably reflects the writing style of the translator. Sometimes when a long document needs to be translated quickly, several translators are put to work on the job, each assigned to translate part of the document. In these cases, the result is usually a translation marked by different and often incompatible writing styles. Certain computer programs for language translation that work without the intervention of human translation can finish the job faster than human translators and produce a stylistically uniform translation with an 80 percent accuracy rate. Therefore, when a long document needs to be translated quickly, it is better to use a computer translation program than human translators.

Which one of the following issues would be LEAST important to resolve in evaluating the argument?
(A) whether the problem of stylistic variety in human translation could be solved by giving stylistic guidelines to human translators --> if human translators can be given stylistic guidelines, they can do the work as good as computer trans programs do. If not, compuetr programs are still better. So drop this
(B) whether numerical comparisons of the accuracy of translations can reasonably be made --> numerical comparison of the accuracy plays no role to evaluate whether computer or human translators are better. So the best
(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style --> if each have their own styles, using computer translator won't be reliable anymore because with each computer translator program, we have a different translation of a document. If each don't have, computer trans programs are still better. So drop this
(D) whether the computer translation contains errors of grammar and usage that drastically alter the meaning of the text --> if yes, a computer trans programs won't be reliable anymore. If not, they are still better -->drop
(E) how the accuracy rate of computer translation programs compares with that of human translators in relation to the users’ needs --> if 100% comparable to that of human translator, they are still better because they are faster and more accurate. If not 100% comparable to that of human translators, although they are faster and more accurate, they are still worse in the practicality in that users will use human translators rather than computer translator

Additionally, what is POE ??? I already know OA and OE, but not yet POE
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 11:21
I will take a crack at this. I go with C. What is the source of the question btw?

Conclusion: Therefore, when a long document needs to be translated quickly, it is better to use a computer translation program than human translators.

Question - which has the least relevance in evaluating the argument?

(A) whether the problem of stylistic variety in human translation could be solved by giving stylistic guidelines to human translators

This is relevant - if this is done, it fixes the human translation issue then we can't use the Computer translation program.

(B) whether numerical comparisons of the accuracy of translations can reasonably be made
This is relevant - if you can't compare % of accuracy between computer and human translators, then you can't evaluate the argument.

(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style

This is NOT relevant. Who cares if I use one computer program vs another program. I'm comparing a computer program versus a human translator. I'm not comparing a computer program to another computer program.

(D) whether the computer translation contains errors of grammar and usage that drastically alter the meaning of the text

This is relevant - if the computer program screws up the meaning of the text, then we can't really use it, can we?

(E) how the accuracy rate of computer translation programs compares with that of human translators in relation to the users’ needs

This is relevant - this is somewhat to D) If the program screws up the meaning of the text, and the users can't understand it, then it is relevant.

sondenso wrote:
A translation invariably reflects the writing style of the translator. Sometimes when a long document needs to be translated quickly, several translators are put to work on the job, each assigned to translate part of the document. In these cases, the result is usually a translation marked by different and often incompatible writing styles. Certain computer programs for language translation that work without the intervention of human translation can finish the job faster than human translators and produce a stylistically uniform translation with an 80 percent accuracy rate. Therefore, when a long document needs to be translated quickly, it is better to use a computer translation program than human translators.

Which one of the following issues would be LEAST important to resolve in evaluating the argument?
(A) whether the problem of stylistic variety in human translation could be solved by giving stylistic guidelines to human translators
(B) whether numerical comparisons of the accuracy of translations can reasonably be made
(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style
(D) whether the computer translation contains errors of grammar and usage that drastically alter the meaning of the text
(E) how the accuracy rate of computer translation programs compares with that of human translators in relation to the users’ needs


Dont know why OA is that OA? :-D
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 11:29
bigfernhead wrote:
I will take a crack at this. I go with C. What is the source of the question btw?

Conclusion: Therefore, when a long document needs to be translated quickly, it is better to use a computer translation program than human translators.

Question - which has the least relevance in evaluating the argument?

(A) whether the problem of stylistic variety in human translation could be solved by giving stylistic guidelines to human translators

This is relevant - if this is done, it fixes the human translation issue then we can't use the Computer translation program.

(B) whether numerical comparisons of the accuracy of translations can reasonably be made
This is relevant - if you can't compare % of accuracy between computer and human translators, then you can't evaluate the government.

(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style

This is NOT relevant. Who cares if I use one computer program vs another program. I'm comparing a computer program versus a human translator. I'm not comparing a computer program to another computer program.

(D) whether the computer translation contains errors of grammar and usage that drastically alter the meaning of the text

This is relevant - if the computer program screws up the meaning of the text, then we can't really use it, can we?

(E) how the accuracy rate of computer translation programs compares with that of human translators in relation to the users’ needs

This is relevant - this is somewhat to D) If the program screws up the meaning of the text, and the users can't understand it, then it is relevant.

sondenso wrote:
A translation invariably reflects the writing style of the translator. Sometimes when a long document needs to be translated quickly, several translators are put to work on the job, each assigned to translate part of the document. In these cases, the result is usually a translation marked by different and often incompatible writing styles. Certain computer programs for language translation that work without the intervention of human translation can finish the job faster than human translators and produce a stylistically uniform translation with an 80 percent accuracy rate. Therefore, when a long document needs to be translated quickly, it is better to use a computer translation program than human translators.

Which one of the following issues would be LEAST important to resolve in evaluating the argument?
(A) whether the problem of stylistic variety in human translation could be solved by giving stylistic guidelines to human translators
(B) whether numerical comparisons of the accuracy of translations can reasonably be made
(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style
(D) whether the computer translation contains errors of grammar and usage that drastically alter the meaning of the text
(E) how the accuracy rate of computer translation programs compares with that of human translators in relation to the users’ needs


Dont know why OA is that OA? :-D


i would go with C too coz here we are talking about a long doc. and a computer can translate a long doc.at a time so it doesn't matter whether the writing styles of machine is different coz at a time only one writing style would be there and we want that only.
OA please?? Source Please.. nice ques.
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 11:38
Minheequang wrote:
IMO B. Using yes-no question technique from power score gmat critical bible

A translation invariably reflects the writing style of the translator. Sometimes when a long document needs to be translated quickly, several translators are put to work on the job, each assigned to translate part of the document. In these cases, the result is usually a translation marked by different and often incompatible writing styles. Certain computer programs for language translation that work without the intervention of human translation can finish the job faster than human translators and produce a stylistically uniform translation with an 80 percent accuracy rate. Therefore, when a long document needs to be translated quickly, it is better to use a computer translation program than human translators.

Which one of the following issues would be LEAST important to resolve in evaluating the argument?
(A) whether the problem of stylistic variety in human translation could be solved by giving stylistic guidelines to human translators --> if human translators can be given stylistic guidelines, they can do the work as good as computer trans programs do. If not, compuetr programs are still better. So drop this
(B) whether numerical comparisons of the accuracy of translations can reasonably be made --> numerical comparison of the accuracy plays no role to evaluate whether computer or human translators are better. So the best
(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style --> if each have their own styles, using computer translator won't be reliable anymore because with each computer translator program, we have a different translation of a document. If each don't have, computer trans programs are still better. So drop this
(D) whether the computer translation contains errors of grammar and usage that drastically alter the meaning of the text --> if yes, a computer trans programs won't be reliable anymore. If not, they are still better -->drop
(E) how the accuracy rate of computer translation programs compares with that of human translators in relation to the users’ needs --> if 100% comparable to that of human translator, they are still better because they are faster and more accurate. If not 100% comparable to that of human translators, although they are faster and more accurate, they are still worse in the practicality in that users will use human translators rather than computer translator

Additionally, what is POE ??? I already know OA and OE, but not yet POE


POE = process of elimination.
I have a feeling you are right on B, I should stop doing CR at 2:30am
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 17:03
Should be B

"and produce a stylistically uniform translation with an 80 percent accuracy rate" - That's the premise. It's about the accuracy of the stylistic uniformity.

Option B talks about 'comparison of accuracy between computers and humans' - not about the comparison of accuracy of stylistic uniformity.
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 17:20
sondenso, pls post OA
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2009, 21:29
bigfernhead wrote:
(C) whether computer translation programs, like human translators, each have their own distinct writing style

This is NOT relevant. Who cares if I use one computer program vs another program. I'm comparing a computer program versus a human translator. I'm not comparing a computer program to another computer program.


Thanks all guys for disccusion

Bigfernhead's reasonings definitely persuded me!

OA is C
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Re: Translation documents  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2009, 05:07
I'm with C too.

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Re: Translation documents &nbs [#permalink] 09 Jun 2009, 05:07
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