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A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not

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Re: A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2011, 08:45
A and D are identical,
As D states the some circular argument are valid ( for this to happen then premise of argument has to be true which is what option A is also suggesting.

A is more direct in statement so A is my answer
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Re: A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2012, 06:42
Alas ! i chose (D).
good question though.
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Re: A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2012, 10:02
I have a question for option A:

How can a circular argument be valid if all of its premises are true. As, for a valid argument, it is not possible for all the premises to be true.
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Re: A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2012, 10:12
I think, even if the conclusion is true is will not make the argument valid. It becomes valid when no all its premises are true and the conclusion is true.

What A says is based just on conclusion being true.
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New post 22 Dec 2013, 00:37
A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not possible for all the premises to be true and the conclusion false. A circular argument is sometimes defined as one in which one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.

ARGUMENT SAYS THAT not possible for the conclusion TO BE false. IT MEANS THAT Conclusion has to be true.......
Now in circular argument - one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.
Hence, if the premise is true and identical to conclusion.....the conclusion is also true. This circular argument in which premise is true and conclusion true- is a valid argument as per definition above.....If other premises are also true( though not an essential requirement) the argument is still valid.

Only A correctly mentions this . Hence answer = A.
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Re: A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2014, 08:19
semwal wrote:
A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not possible for all the premises to be true and the conclusion false. A circular argument is sometimes defined as one in which one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.

ARGUMENT SAYS THAT not possible for the conclusion TO BE false. IT MEANS THAT Conclusion has to be true.......
Now in circular argument - one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.
Hence, if the premise is true and identical to conclusion.....the conclusion is also true. This circular argument in which premise is true and conclusion true- is a valid argument as per definition above.....If other premises are also true( though not an essential requirement) the argument is still valid.

Only A correctly mentions this . Hence answer = A.


'If other premises are also true( though not an essential requirement) the argument is still valid' -- i don't understand how does an argument turn out to be valid when all other premises are also try since the question states 'it is not possible for all the premises to be true'.

Could you please shed some light on that?
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A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2015, 08:30
durgesh79 wrote:
A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not possible for all the premises to be true and the conclusion false. A circular argument is sometimes defined as one in which one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.

From these definitions we can infer that...

(A) Every circular argument is valid as long as its premises are true.
(B) Every valid argument is circular.
(C) No circular argument is valid.
(D) Some circular arguments are valid, and some are not.
(E) Some circular arguments are not valid, and some valid arguments are not circular.



AS A RETHOUGHT........

how can A be right ?
(A) Every circular argument is valid as long as its premises are true..... IF ALL PREMISES ARE TRUE, THEN THE CONCLUSION IS TRUE AS THE CONCLUSION IS ONE OF THE PREMISES WHICH IS TRUE.........

BUT this argument cannot be valid as the definition of valid argument says that
condition 1. at least one premise has to be false.....THIS CONDITION IS NOT MET HERE......
condition 2. Conclusion cant be false.......THIS CONDITION IS MET......

But because of " CONDITION 1 NOT BEING MET" this circular argument cant be valid !!!!!!!

Request EXPERTS TO EXPLAIN whats wrong with this line of thought........
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Re: A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not  [#permalink]

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Re: A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not &nbs [#permalink] 24 Jan 2016, 19:35

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