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Admissions Consulting Updates from Veritas Prep

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Essay Advice for the 2017-2018 Columbia MBA Application [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 18:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Essay Advice for the 2017-2018 Columbia MBA Application
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We are excited to deliver advice on Columbia Business School’s new MBA admissions essays. This is just a taste of what you can expect in addressing this year’s prompts. To skip right to the full version of our advice, click here.

Let’s look at each essay question individually:

Essay #1
Through your resume and recommendations, we have a clear sense of your professional path to date. What are your career goals over the next 3-5 years and what, in your imagination, would be your long-term dream job? (500 words)

The first essay essentially asks the applicant to describe their short term career goals and long-term dream job.  Quick advice: your goals should be researched, realistic, and real.

Essay #2
The full-time MBA experience includes academics, recruiting, and networking. What are your personal priorities and how do you anticipate allocating your time at Columbia Business School? (250 words)

The second essay asks the applicant to describe his or her personal priorities and how they plan to allocate his or her time at CBS.  Quick advice: go deep with your research before you start on this essay so you can show the admissions committee that you really understand what it’s like to be a Columbia Business School student, and that you know what you will be like as a member of the class and community.

Essay #3
Please select and answer one of the following essay questions: (250 words)

a. Please tell us what you feel most passionate about in life.

b. If you were given a free day and could spend it anywhere, in any way you choose, what would you do?

The third CBS essay gives you a choice between answering two prompts, but is basically trying to learn what makes you you, or what makes you interesting.  Quick advice: be genuine and be memorable.

Just a few quick thoughts on the new batch of admissions essays from Columbia Business School. To read all of our detailed advice on the Columbia essays, visit the Veritas Prep Essential Guide to Top Business Schools.

Applying to Columbia or other business schools? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or get free expert advice! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

The post Essay Advice for the 2017-2018 Columbia MBA Application appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Is It Incorrect to Use Multiple Verb Tenses in a Sentence? [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Is It Incorrect to Use Multiple Verb Tenses in a Sentence?
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Some GMAT test-takers wonder whether it is grammatically correct to use multiple tenses in a single sentence. Today we will discuss the cases in which this is acceptable and those in which this is not. The bottom line is this: there is no restriction on what tenses we can use and mix within a sentence, as long as they are appropriate for the context.

Take a look at this example sentence:

I have heard that Mona left Manchester this morning, and has already arrived in London, where she will be for the next three weeks.

Here, we have present perfect tense, simple past tense and simple future tense all in the same sentence, but they all make sense together to create a logical sequence of events.

The confusion over using multiple verb tenses in one sentence probably arises because we have heard that we need to maintain verb tense consistency. These two things are different.

Tense Consistency – We do not switch one tense to another unless the timing of the action demands that we do. We do not switch tenses when there is no time change for the actions.

Let’s take a look at some examples to understand this:

Example 1: During the match, my dad stood up and waved at me.

These two actions (“stood” and “waved”) happen at the same time and hence, need to have the same tense. This sentence could take place in the present or future tense too, but both verbs will still need to take on the same tense. For example:

Example 2: During my matches, my dad stands up and waves at me.

Example 3: During the match tomorrow, my dad will stand up and wave at me.

On the other hand, a sentence such as…

Example 4: During the match, my dad stood up and waves at me.

This sentence is grammatically incorrect. Since both actions (“stood” and “waves”) happen at the same time, we need them to be in the same tense, as shown in the variations of this sentence above. Consider this case, however:

Example 5: My dad reached for the sandwich after he had already eaten a whole pizza.

Here, the two actions (“reached” and “eaten”) happen at different times in the past, so we use both the simple past and past perfect tenses. The shift in tense is correct in this context.

Takeaway: The tenses of verbs in a sentence must be consistent when the actions happen at the same time. When dealing with actions that occur at different points in time, however, we can use multiple tenses in the same sentence.

Let’s look at an official GMAT question now to see how multiple tenses can be a part of the same sentence:

For the farmer who takes care to keep them cool, providing them with high-energy feed, and milking them regularly, Holstein cows are producing an average of 2,275 gallons of milk each per year.

(A) providing them with high-energy feed, and milking them regularly, Holstein cows are producing

(B) providing them with high-energy feed, and milked regularly, the Holstein cow produces

(C) provided with high-energy feed, and milking them regularly, Holstein cows are producing

(D) provided with high-energy feed, and milked regularly, the Holstein cow produces

(E) provided with high-energy feed, and milked regularly, Holstein cows will produce

This is a very tricky question. Let’s first shortlist our options based on the obvious errors.

The non-underlined part of the sentence uses the pronoun “them” to refer to the cows, so using “the Holstein cow” (singular) as the antecedent will be incorrect. The antecedent must be “Holstein cows” (plural) – this means answer choices B and D are out.

Also, we know for sure that “provide” and “milk” are parallel elements in the sentence, so they should take the same verb tense. Hence, answer choice C is also out.

Let’s look at A now. If we assume this option is correct, “providing” and “milking” act as modifiers to “keep them cool”. That certainly does not make sense since “providing with high energy feed” and “milking regularly” are not ways of keeping cows cool.

This means the correct answer is E, but we need to see how.

For the farmer who takes care to keep them cool, provided with high-energy feed, and milked regularly, Holstein cows will produce an average of 2,275 gallons of milk each per year.

Let’s break down the sentence:

For the farmer who takes care to keep them…

  • cool,
  • provided with high-energy feed,
  • milked regularly,
…Holstein cows will produce an average of 2,275 gallons of milk each per year.

Note that we use two different tenses here: “For the farmer who takes care…” and “cows will produce…”. The word “takes” is the present tense while “will produce” is the future, but that does not make this sentence incorrect. The context of the author could very well justify the use of the future tense. Perhaps the farmers have obtained Holstein cows recently, and hence, will see the produce of 2,275 gallons in the future, only.

A shift in the tense certainly doesn’t make the sentence incorrect. When you’re presented with multiple verbs in various tenses in a problem, check to determine whether the verbs convey a logical sequence of events.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? Check out one of our many free GMAT resources to get a jump start on your GMAT prep. And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter for more helpful tips like this one!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Is It Incorrect to Use Multiple Verb Tenses in a Sentence? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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The GRE Exam for Law School? [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 10:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: The GRE Exam for Law School?
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Update: On August 7, 2017, Northwestern University’s Pritzker School of Law and Georgetown Law also announced that they will begin accepting the GRE or the LSAT for admissions. With this news, it seems all the more inevitable that the GRE will soon be universally accepted among top law schools. Read on…”

Harvard Law is the oldest continually-operating law school in the United States. It is consistently ranked as one of the top law schools in the world, and is also the largest law school in the U.S., with about as many students as Yale, Stanford and Chicago combined. So when Harvard Law makes news other law schools are likely to follow.

And Harvard Law recently announced some big news: starting next fall the GRE exam will be accepted as an alternative to the LSAT exam. Surveys suggest that nearly half of all law schools were not opposed to accepting GRE exam scores even before Harvard made its announcement, so this is probably just the beginning of a trend.

The upshot of all of this is that beginning next fall those prospective law students applying to Harvard Law can submit a GRE score instead of, or in addition to, an LSAT score. The University of Arizona Law School has already begun accepting the GRE score from applicants, and if the results from those law schools are as positive as expected, then additional law schools will likely join them in the very near future.

LSAT vs. GRE
I have taught the LSAT and currently teach the GRE and (as well as the GMAT), and have earned a perfect 170/170 on the GRE and a near-perfect 176 on the LSAT. Here are my thoughts on the LSAT versus the GRE:

The LSAT has long been the dreaded gatekeeper to law school admissions and the exam definitely rewards a certain type of test taker with a certain background. So, should you consider taking the GRE instead of the LSAT? Maybe you should!

First, who does not benefit from this development? Those who plan on applying exclusively to law school in the next couple of years should stick with the LSAT to have the most flexibility in the application process. As Harvard and Arizona are currently the only law schools that accept GRE scores from applicants, you’ll want to have a good LSAT score under your belt in case you decide to apply to any other JD programs.

Everyone else should at least consider the GRE. The Dean of Harvard Law School, Martha Minow, listed a few of the groups of students who might benefit from being able to use the GRE instead of the LSAT: “international students, multidisciplinary scholars, and joint-degree students…” I would add to that list students who have strong math skills, who have different possible career paths, or who have less time to devote to the process of preparing for an exam.

Advantages of Taking the GRE
Flexibility: The GRE is accepted for admission to nearly all graduate and business schools in addition to Harvard Law School and Arizona Law School (and hopefully a growing list of law schools). For anyone considering a variety of career options, the GRE is the best exam to take as it gives the test-taker the most flexibility. Even a great GMAT score is not accepted by law schools or graduate schools, and a perfect LSAT score will not get you into business or grad school. The GRE is the universal key that can open many doors – this is the number one reason to make the GRE your first choice.

Time Commitment: For many students, the LSAT is the exam that requires the most hours of preparation. The sheer variety of critical reasoning questions and “logic games” requires a student to master a huge range of information. On the other hand, the GRE tests skills that a student is more likely to possess already or can learn more readily through a preparation course or self-study. This is not to say that the GRE is not a challenge, it just may be a more reasonable challenge than the LSAT.

Credit for Your Strengths: Maybe you are strong in Quantitative areas… This can give you an important head start on the GRE, as math is not tested on the LSAT.

Convenience: The GRE is offered in convenient locations around the world on a continuous basis, with times generally available in the morning, afternoon and evening, making it easy to fit the GRE into your schedule. By comparison, the LSAT exam is only offered 4 times per year, usually at 8:00am. With the LSAT, you have to arrange your life around the exam, which can be difficult for test-takers with busy schedules.

Reasonable Retakes: If for any reason you do not earn the LSAT score that you hoped for, then you have to wait anywhere from two to four months before you can retake the exam. On the other hand, you can retake the GRE after just 21 days and you can take the exam 5 times in a year.

Advantages of Taking the LSAT
No Math Required: The LSAT exclusively tests skills that fall on the “Verbal” side of the GRE, meaning that you won’t have to memorize the Pythagorean Theorem, practice working with algebra, or brush up on your multiplication tables before you take it.  If you’re a student who hasn’t studied math in a while, the LSAT allows you to engage your logical thinking (philosophy, political science, literature) brain without having to dig back into high school math skills.

Applicable to All Law School Applications: While what Harvard says typically filters down to nearly all schools eventually, right now the GRE is only accepted at a few law schools.  If you plan to take the GRE to apply to Harvard and a few other elite JD programs, you’ll end up having to take the LSAT for those other applications, anyway.

Availability of Official Practice Problems: The LSAT has been administering essentially the same exam for decades, and has to retire its questions after each administration. The result? It has thousands of official exam questions to sell you for practice.  By comparison the GRE underwent an overhaul in 2011 and has some official test questions for sale, but the LSAT provides several times as much authentic practice material.

Is the GRE Easier Than the LSAT?
It is not easy to get into Harvard or any of the other top law schools. The average LSAT score for the most recent class at Harvard Law is above the 99th percentile, so an applicant’s GRE score would need to be near-perfect to be competitive.

Please understand that if you do plan to take the GRE for admission to law school, business school, or a competitive graduate school program, you will need to earn the best score that you are capable of achieving. Taking the GRE is not a short cut or an “easy way” to get into a top law school (or business school). But it is another option and – for some people – a better option.

My advice is this: Unless you are committed to applying to law school in the next couple of years, consider taking the GRE. The GRE gives you the most options (graduate school, business school, law school) and its scores are reportable for 5 years. This means that if you take the GRE this year your scores will still be good for applications submitted in 2022.

Considering taking the GRE? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions to jump start your GRE prep, or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

David Newland has scored in the 99th percentile on both the LSAT and the GMAT, and holds a perfect 170/170 score on the GRE.  He taught the LSAT for nearly ten years for a leading firm, and has taught the GRE and GMAT for Veritas Prep since 2006.  In 2008 he was named Veritas Prep’s Worldwide Instructor of the Year, and he has been a senior contributor to the Veritas Prep GRE and GMAT lesson materials. David holds a Juris Doctorate from the University of Michigan Law School and teaches live online classes from a film studio in northern Vermont.

The post The GRE Exam for Law School? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Re: Admissions Consulting Updates from Veritas Prep [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2017, 02:33
Hello Thank you so much for helping us with this.
I have a 690 in GMAT and 3.75 yrs of work experience in an Oil Company in India.
I have some social work under my belt and am working on a NGO of my own.
I have a 7.87 CGPA from a top university in India.
I have worked with international vendors and have worked in projects that value nearly 100M USD.
Target schools include INSEAD, HEC and IE.
Any suggestions to improve my profile or mold it to the requirements of the above schools?
Thank you.

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The Third Type of GMAT Quant Question [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2017, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: The Third Type of GMAT Quant Question
We all know that GMAT Quant questions are of two types: Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency.

But, if we look carefully, we will see a third type of question – combination of the two. There are a few statements given in them (like in Data Sufficiency questions) and five options to choose from (like in Problem Solving questions). But since we know how to solve both these question types, we shouldn’t really have a problem in solving this third type, or so one would think!

In any GMAT question, it is very important to know two things:

  • What is given
  • What is asked
Now, one might think that it is a very obvious distinction and why are we even trying to discuss it in a post. In this third question type, this exact distinction is far harder to explain because here the statements do NOT represent the data given. Here the statements actually ask “Is this true?” and many test-takers find it hard to make that switch. To clarify, let’s discuss the structure of the three question types.

Problem Solving Question:

Question: A and B are given, what is X?

(A) X is …

(B) X is …

(C) X is …

(D) X is …

(E) X is …

Data Sufficiency Question:

Question: A and B are given, what is X?

I. We are given that X and Y are related.

II. We are given that X and Z are related.

“Which of the following must be true?” Question:

Question: A and B are given, which of the following must be true about X?

I. Is this true about X?

II. Is this true about X?

III. Is this true about X?

(A) I is true

(B) I and II are true

and so on…

We hope you see that the statements in a Data Sufficiency question are different from the statements in this third type of question.

We will elaborate with the help of an example now:

Question: If |x| > 3, which of the following must be true?

I. x > 3

II. x^2 > 9

III. |x – 1| > 2

(A) I only

(B) II only

(C) I and II only

(D) II and III only

(E) I, II, and III

Solution:

We are given that |x| > 3

This implies that x is a point at a distance of more than 3 from 0. So x could be greater than 3 or less than -3. Before we go any further, let’s think about the values x can take: 3.00001, 3.5, 4.2, 5.7, 67, 1000, -3.45, -4, -8, -100 etc. The only values it cannot take are -3 <= x <= 3

Which of the following must be true?

I. x > 3

This is a question even though it looks like a statement.

Is it necessary that x > 3?

For every value that x can take, must x be greater than 3? No. As discussed above, x could take values such as 3.00001, 3.5, 4.2, 5.7, 67, 1000 but it could also take values such as  -3.45, -4, -8, -100.

So this is not necessarily true.

II. x^2 > 9

Again, this is a question even though it looks like a statement.

Taking square root on both sides since they are positive, we get

Sqrt(x^2) > Sqrt(9)

|x| > 3

This is what we are given, hence it certainly is true.

III. |x-1|>2

Yet again, we are asked: Is |x – 1| > 2?

What does |x – 1|> 2 imply?

The distance of x from 1 must be greater than 2. So x is either greater than 3 or less than -1. Now, recall all the values that x can take.

So this is the question now: Is every value that x can take greater than 3 or less than -1?

Recall the values that x can take (discussed above)

3.00001 : x is greater than 3

3.5 : x is greater than 3

4.2 : x is greater than 3

5.7 : x is greater than 3

67 : x is greater than 3

1000 : x is greater than 3

-3.45 : x is less than -1

-4 : x is less than -1

-8 : x is less than -1

-100 : x is less than -1

For every value that x can take, x will be either greater than 3 or less than -1. Note that we are not saying that every value less than -1 must be valid for x. We are saying that every value that is valid for x (found by using |x| > 3) will be either greater than 3 or less than -1 since any value less than -3 is obviously less than -1 too. Hence |x-1|>2 must be true for every value that x can take.

Answer (D)

We hope you are quite clear about how to handle this third question type now!

Getting ready to take the GMAT? Check out one of our many free GMAT resources to get a jump start on your GMAT prep. And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter for more helpful tips like this one!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post The Third Type of GMAT Quant Question appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How to Prepare for Your Business School Interview [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2017, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Prepare for Your Business School Interview
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For many applicants the notification of an interview invite from your dream school is an exciting next step after an arduous application process. All of your hard work has finally boiled down to some initial success. However, typically the excitement soon turns to anxiety as candidates begin to realize they have no idea how to prepare for an admissions interview for business school. “Is it just like a regular job interview?” “What type of questions do they ask?” are just some of the common initial questions that can arise once an interview invitation is received.

The business school interview should not be viewed as anything new to you. It is more similar to the traditional job interview than you might expect. Just like a regular interview you are aiming to impress and the majority of the interview will be focused on YOU! The key difference with this interview is really just the goal, which in this case is admission to the MBA program of your dreams.

I would recommend preparing for your MBA interview the same way you prepare for any job interview, it starts with knowing your own personal background inside and out along with your motivations for that target business school. Then it’s researching your target school and identifying the aspects that make the school uniquely attractive to you. A nice way to do this is to pair up school-specific offerings of interest with an adjoining explanation for why that offering is uniquely attractive to you. This includes academic offerings, extracurricular activities/professional clubs, career support/recruiting strengths, etc.

Next I would identify common MBA questions like…

  • What Are Your Career Goals?
  • Why an MBA?
  • Why School X?
  • Walk Me Through Your Resume
As well as other common situational business school questions that address interpersonal skills like leadership, teamwork, and maturity. For the most part, these interviews have very few surprises, and you will know what’s coming, which makes the prep all the more important. Preparing conversational responses in a script format to each of the common interview questions can be a method for those that prefer a more structured approach to their interview prep. But make sure to incorporate elements of your personality into your script to avoid coming off as too rehearsed.

Also, breakthrough candidates will make sure to incorporate the “I” of what they accomplished into their script. Make sure to connect the dots with regards to the steps you’ve taken in your career, and remain structured in your responses. Utilizing the S.T.A.R format (Situation-Task-Action-Result) and talking in buckets – “There are 3 Reasons Why I Want to Go to Fuqua” are other tactics one can sneak into their preparation for the interview.

Finally, take particular note of how the interview style of certain schools can affect your responses. Some schools like Kellogg have “blind” interviews so the interviewer will not have seen your application, so they will not have access to important information like GPA, GMAT, essays etc. Other styles can be influenced by the type of interviewer (Alum vs. Student vs. Admissions) or the location (On Campus vs. Off Campus) which can dictate the type of information you are prepared to share as well as list on your resume for the interview.

Don’t let the interview be the end of your business school journey, prepare accordingly and come decision day you will be all smiles!

Want to craft a strong application? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or sign up for a free admissions consultation. Let’s get started!

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants.

The post How to Prepare for Your Business School Interview appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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You Just Submitted Your MBA Applications… Now What? [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2017, 15:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: You Just Submitted Your MBA Applications… Now What?
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After all those months of hard work, you have finally submitted all of your business school applications! Congratulations!

With that burden off of your back, what else should you be doing after you submit your application. Let’s explore a few action items to tick off your to-do list post-submission:

Finish Other Applications

Most MBA applicants don’t apply to only one school, so don’t bask too long in your finished application – there are probably plenty more where that came from. Keep the momentum going, buckle down and get moving on the rest of your applications. Make sure you leverage what you have learned from your previously-submitted application to make each version even better than the last.

Thank Your Recommenders

Recommenders play a huge role in the success of your application. Make sure you acknowledge their hard work, especially if they are providing recommendations for multiple schools. Also, don’t be afraid to send your thanks after each submitted application, or take them out for lunch to show your appreciation of their contribution to your success.

Interview Prep

The best time to prepare for an interview is when all of the information relating your application is still relevant. Some schools can have upwards of 2-3 months in between the application deadline and when they eventually begin interviewing candidates, so try to begin your prep for a potential interview early. Business school application interviews can have a major impact on your candidacy, so getting an early start on your preparation is never a bad thing.

Apply for Scholarships

Business school is not cheap and with very few full scholarships available, it is important to consider all alternatives to paying for your education. External merit-based scholarships are a great way to pay for all or a portion of your MBA. Many of the deadlines for these scholarship opportunities are much earlier in the application cycle than you would expect, so don’t wait until you are admitted to figure out how you will pay for school. There is a lot of money out there, so use your post-submission time to give yourself the best chance at securing some funding.

Relax

Relax! Applying to business school is stressful so it is very important to find pockets of time to relax. For those who still have additional applications to churn out relaxing may be difficult, but if you have submitted all your applications, enjoy the brief break and rest up for the next phase of the process.

Want to craft a strong application? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or sign up for a free admissions consultation. Let’s get started!

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants.

The post You Just Submitted Your MBA Applications… Now What? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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McKinsey’s Chief Learning Officer Encourages You to Develop These 10 C [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2017, 15:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: McKinsey’s Chief Learning Officer Encourages You to Develop These 10 Critical Job Skills
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If you’re getting ready to attend college or graduate school, then you’re probably very interested in building a career or accelerating your current one. A lot of the value that comes from earning a degree is in the prestige of the program and the network that you build, but of course much of the value comes from the actual hard job skills that an education helps you develop. The jobs landscape is changing quickly these days, probably more rapidly than ever. Some skills that virtually guaranteed you a job just two decades ago may now be close to irrelevant. What the heck are you supposed to do to ensure that you can survive — and maybe even thrive — in this environment?

In a recent talk at Darden, Nick van Dam, global chief learning officer at McKinsey & Co., listed out what he thinks are the 10 most critical job skills of the future. Without further ado, they are:

  • Complex problem-solving
  • Critical thinking
  • Creativity
  • People management
  • Coordinating with others
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Judgment and decision-making
  • Service orientation
  • Negotiation
  • Cognitive flexibility
Notice that no specific skills such as “writing code” or “great writing skills” are on the list. Those are undoubtedly the kinds of abilities that will help keep you employed for a long time, but Van Dam’s focused on more general, descriptive skills here. Problem-solving, creativity, cognitive flexibility… If you have these abilities, then there probably isn’t a lot that you can’t do. And, if you can’t do something, then odds are that you’re probably able to learn it pretty quickly. If you can learn and adapt quickly like this, then lifelong learning — something that Van Dam stresses is important — should come relatively easily for you.

We sometimes use the phrase “mental agility” around here at Veritas Prep to describe the same sort of skills. Taking it back to test prep for a moment (we couldn’t help ourselves), that’s why we always urge our students to understand the bigger picture when we teach them how to solve a question. It’s one thing to “learn the trick,” but on test day, when the test presents you with a question that’s sort of similar, but not quite, will you freeze? Or will you have the mental agility to adapt in the moment and solve the problem?

Also, note that there are many others on the list that one would call “soft skills,” such as people management, emotional intelligence, and negotiation. The more that repetitive, measurable tasks are replaced by automation, the more that these soft skills — the kind that a robot can’t do, at least not any time soon! — will matter as you try to move up in the workforce. Either you learn how to write the code, or you learn how to effectively manage the person doing the writing. And, when “write the code” gets replaced by another skill in 20 years, you’ll have the mental agility to learn that skill… or manage that new person with the new skill!

By Scott Shrum.

The post McKinsey’s Chief Learning Officer Encourages You to Develop These 10 Critical Job Skills appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Planning for the “Plan” Questions on the GMAT Critical Reasoning Secti [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2017, 19:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Planning for the “Plan” Questions on the GMAT Critical Reasoning Section
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At Veritas Prep, we are often asked to discuss how to handle the “plan” Critical Reasoning questions test takers are asked on the GMAT. Here is how these questions are different from your regular strengthen/weaken questions – instead of a conclusion, we are given situations and plans to remedy a particular problem. We are then asked to evaluate the success of the plan or identify a weakness in the plan or an assumption of the plan.

Note that a plan question is very similar to a strengthen/weaken/assumption question. The main difference between them is that instead of being given a conclusion, you are asked to strengthen/weaken the possibility of a plan working out or an assumption made in the plan (looking at a few example questions will make this clearer). Let’s look at some examples of each of the three types of “plan” questions you are likely to come across on the GMAT exam:

Example 1 (the most common one): Which of the following will help us in evaluating the success of the plan?

In the country of Bedenia, officials have recently implemented a new healthcare initiative to reduce dangerous wait times at emergency rooms in the country’s hospitals. This initiative increases the number of available emergency nurses and doctors in urban settings: scholarships and no-interest loans are being offered to prospective students in these fields if they work in major city hospitals, relocation packages to urban centers are being offered for current emergency practitioners, and immigration rules are being changed to enable foreign emergency doctors and nurses to more easily move to Bedenia’s major cities.

Which of the following would be most important to determine in assessing whether the initiative will be successful?

(A) What percentage of current nurses and doctors work in emergency medicine.

(B) Which hospitals in Bedenia have dangerous wait times in their emergency rooms.

(C) Whether a career in emergency medicine pays substantially less than other types of medicine.

(D) Whether wait times could be reduced by means other than increasing the number of available nurses and doctors.

(E) Whether many foreign doctors and nurses are currently not allowed to enter Bedenia.

Plan: Reduce the dangerous wait time by increasing the availability of emergency nurses and doctors in urban settings by providing scholarships, offering relocation packages and changing immigration rules.

We need to find out whether this given plan will actually reduce wait time. Note that we are not worried about what else could reduce the dangerous wait time or what else this plan could do. The only point of concern for us is whether this plan will reduce the wait time.

This plan intends to increase the availability of emergency nurses and doctors in urban settings, so ask yourself this question: is this actually what is required? Do the urban hospitals have dangerous wait times? What if only rural hospitals have wait times and that is where the impetus is required? Answer choice B addresses exactly this question and, hence, will allow us to determine whether or not the initiative will be successful. Therefore, the answer is B.

Now look at our second example:

Example 2: Which of the following provides an argument against the plan?

In the last two years alone, nearly a dozen of Central University’s most prominent professors have been lured away by the higher salaries offered by competing academic institutions. In order to protect the school’s ranking, Central University’s president has proposed increasing tuition by 10% and using the extra money to offer more attractive compensation packages to the most talented and well-known members of its faculty.

Which of the following provides the most persuasive argument against the university president’s proposed course of action?

(A) It is inevitable that at least some members of the faculty will ultimately take jobs at other universities, regardless of how much Central University offers to pay them.

(B) Other universities are also looking for ways to provide higher salaries to prominent members of the faculty.

(C) Central University slipped in the last year’s ranking of regional schools.

(D) The single most important factor in ranking a university is its racial and socioeconomic diversity.

(E) The president of Central University has only been in office for 18 months and has never managed such a large enterprise.

Plan: Protect the school’s ranking by retaining its most prominent members by increasing their compensation.

We need to find a persuasive argument against the given plan – something that leads us to believe the plan should not be implemented. Here, test takers often become confused between options B and D. Let’s break down each answer choice in detail to determine which one is correct:

(B) Other universities are also looking for ways to provide higher salaries to prominent members of the faculty.

This option supports the given plan. It is a reason to actually implement the plan since if more disparity gets created, more prominent professors will leave. Remember, we are looking for an option that is against the plan, so B cannot be our answer.

(D) The single most important factor in ranking a university is its racial and socioeconomic diversity.

This is an argument against the plan. It states that the single most important factor in ranking is “racial and socioeconomic diversity,” so trying to retain prominent professors is not likely to retain ranking. Hence, the correct answer would be D.

Now let’s look at our final example:

Example 3: Which of the following is an assumption of the plan?

The general availability of high-quality electronic scanners and color printers for computers has made the counterfeiting of checks much easier. In order to deter such counterfeiting, several banks plan to issue to their corporate customers checks that contain dots too small to be accurately duplicated by any electronic scanner currently available; when such checks are scanned and printed, the dots seem to blend together in such a way that the word “VOID” appears on the check.

A questionable assumption of the plan is that

(A) in the territory served by the banks the proportion of counterfeit checks that are made using electronic scanners has remained approximately constant over the past few years.

(B) most counterfeiters who use electronic scanners counterfeit checks only for relatively large amounts of money.

(C) the smallest dots on the proposed checks cannot be distinguished visually except under strong magnification.

(D) most corporations served by these banks will not have to pay more for the new checks than for traditional checks.

(E) the size of the smallest dots that generally available electronic scanners are able to reproduce accurately will not decrease significantly in the near future.

Plan: To deter counterfeiting, issue checks that contain dots too small to be accurately duplicated (which will form the word VOID) by any electronic scanner currently available.

We need to find an assumption that this given plan makes. Note that the plan is based on the capabilities of the currently available scanners and assumes that their capabilities will not improve in the near future. Hence, E is an assumption.

Some test takers get confused with  answer choice C:

(C) the smallest dots on the proposed checks cannot be distinguished visually except under strong magnification

This option is actually not an assumption. Even if the dots can be distinguished visually, they don’t form the word VOID. Only when current scanners scan the checks and then we print them do the dots merge to form the word. Thus, our answer is E.

We hope you have understood how to handle various “plan” questions on the GMAT. The most important aspect of such questions to remember is to first identify the plan and what one hopes to achieve through it.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? Check out one of our many free GMAT resources to get a jump start on your GMAT prep. And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter for more helpful tips like this one!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Planning for the “Plan” Questions on the GMAT Critical Reasoning Section appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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How to Write a Strong Common App Essay [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2017, 15:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Write a Strong Common App Essay
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Over 700 American Colleges and Universities utilize the Common Application system to streamline the application process. Among the many elements of the application itself, you will have to choose ONE of seven Personal Statement prompts to respond to, and you’ll have 250-650 words for your narrative.

When you’re staring at the seven Common App essay prompts, the choices can seem overwhelming, and the stakes are high.  Depending on the prompt that you select, you’ll need to write something that is informative and emotionally compelling, but not a cliché. You need to be unique and demonstrate character, while also proving you’ll add insight and experiences to the incoming freshman class. You need to talk about your leadership and accomplishments, but stay humble.  You need to be yourself while also keeping your voice professional.  It’s a lot to convey your authentic self in 650 words or less, but Veritas Prep has you covered with our Personal Statement Guide.

Our College Admissions Consultants all have formal admissions decision-making experience, and they have reviewed each of the seven Personal Statement prompts to provide guidance on how to respond to each of the options.  Best of luck!

Prompt #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Read advice>

Prompt #2: The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Read advice>

Prompt #3: Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Read advice>

Prompt #4: Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma – anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. Read advice>

Prompt #5: Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. Read advice>

Prompt #6: Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Read advice>

Prompt #7: Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you’ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. Read advice>

Do you need more help navigating the college admissions process? Fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

The post How to Write a Strong Common App Essay appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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How to Write a Yale Supplemental Essay [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2017, 15:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Write a Yale Supplemental Essay
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For the 2017-2018 application season, Yale has asked all applicants to answer to several Yale-specific short answer questions in addition to the Personal Statement. To see a list of all Yale-specific essay prompts, click here.

Additionally, Veritas Prep had one of our college admissions expert review one of Yale’s supplemental essay prompts. Take a look at our tips for writing a winning Yale-specific essays here.

Responses to school-specific essays help admissions committee understand why you are a good fit for the school, and why the school is a good fit for your personal goals! It’s imperative to think strategically about your responses to each school-specific essay, as they play a crucial role in admissions decisions. If you’d like expert guidance on how to write strong essays for all of the schools on your list, check out our admissions consulting services here.

Do you need more help navigating the college admissions process? Fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

The post How to Write a Yale Supplemental Essay appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: To Learn To-Infinitives [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2017, 17:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: To Learn To-Infinitives
In our previous posts, we have discussed two types of Verbals (a verb that acts as a different part of speech) – Gerunds and Participles. Today we will take a look at the third type – to-Infinitives

Note that the infinitive is the base form of a verb. The infinitive has two forms:

• the to-infinitive = to + base

• the zero infinitive = base

We will discuss the to-infinitive form, a verbal. It can work as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb

The to-infinitive form is used in many sentence constructions, often expressing the purpose of something or someone’s opinion about something. The to-infinitive is used following a large collection of different verbs as well such as afford, offer, refuse, prepare, undertake, proceed, propose, promise etc

The function of a to-infinitive in a sentence could be any of the following:

I. To show the purpose of an action: In this case “to” has the same meaning as “in order to” or “so as to”. It follows a verb in this case.

For Example: She has gone to complete her homework.

II. To indicate what something can or will be used for: It follows a noun or a pronoun in this case.

For Example: I don’t have anything to wear. This is the right thing to do.

III. After adjectives

For Example: I am happy to be here.

IV. The subject of the sentence

For Example: To visit Paris is my lifelong dream.

V. With adverbs: It is used with the adverbs too and enough to express the reasoning behind our satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The pattern is that too and enough are placed before or after the adjective, adverb, or noun that they modify in the same way they would be without the to-infinitive. We then follow them by the to-infinitive to explain the reason why the quantity is excessive, sufficient, or insufficient.

For Example: He has too many books to carry on his own.

VI. With question words: The verbs ask, decide, explain, forget, know, show, tell, & understand can be followed by a question word such as where, how, what, who, & when + the to-infinitive.

For Example: I am not sure how to use the new washing machine.

We are likely to see infinitive phrases in GMAT sentence correction questions. An infinitive phrase is made up of the infinitive verb with its object and modifiers.

Let’s take a look at how we could see an infinitive in a GMAT question.

Question: Twenty-two feet long and 10 feet in diameter, the AM-1 is one of the many new satellites that is a part of 15 years effort of subjecting the interactions of Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces to detailed scrutiny from space.

(A) satellites that is a part of 15 years effort of subjecting the interactions of Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces

(B) satellites, which is a part of a 15-year effort to subject how Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces interact

(C) satellites, part of 15 years effort of subjecting how Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces are interacting

(D) satellites that are part of an effort for 15 years that has subjected the interactions of Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces

(E) satellites that are part of a 15-year effort to subject the interactions of Earth’s atmosphere, ocean, and land surfaces

Solution:

First let’s try to understand the basic structure of the sentence.

… AM-1 is one of the many new satellites “that/which clause”

“that/which clause” modifies the noun “satellites” in four of the given five options. Note that “satellites” is plural so we need to use the verb “are”. So options (A) and (B) are out.

(C) is also incorrect. It looks like “part of 15 years … from space” is a bad attempt at writing an absolute phrase. Absolute phrases modify the entire clause but here we need to modify “satellites” only. Satellites are a part of a 15 year effort to subject A to detailed scrutiny and hence we should use a that/which clause.

(D) is incorrect too. It uses another “that clause” – that has subjected the interactions …

This “that clause” modifies the noun “effort”, not “15 years”. The effort has subjected A to detailed scrutiny.

There is a better way of writing this sentence such that the “that clause” comes immediately after “effort”

(E) is correct. Note how it uses the infinitive form immediately after the noun “effort” to indicate how the effort is being used. It is being used to subject A to detailed scrutiny.

Hope now you will be able to recognise the different verbals and use them correctly.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? Check out one of our many free GMAT resources to get a jump start on your GMAT prep. And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter for more helpful tips like this one!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: To Learn To-Infinitives appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How to Write a Strong Common App Essay [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2017, 11:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Write a Strong Common App Essay
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Over 700 American Colleges and Universities utilize the Common Application system to streamline the application process. Among the many elements of the application itself, you will have to choose ONE of seven Personal Statement prompts to respond to, and you’ll have 250-650 words for your narrative.

When you’re staring at the seven Common App essay prompts, the choices can seem overwhelming, and the stakes are high.  Depending on the prompt that you select, you’ll need to write something that is informative and emotionally compelling, but not a cliché. You need to be unique and demonstrate character, while also proving you’ll add insight and experiences to the incoming freshman class. You need to talk about your leadership and accomplishments, but stay humble.  You need to be yourself while also keeping your voice professional.  It’s a lot to convey your authentic self in 650 words or less, but Veritas Prep has you covered with our Personal Statement Guide.

Our College Admissions Consultants all have formal admissions decision-making experience, and they have reviewed each of the seven Personal Statement prompts to provide guidance on how to respond to each of the options.  Best of luck!

Prompt #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Read advice>

Prompt #2: The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Read advice>

Prompt #3: Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Read advice>

Prompt #4: Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma – anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. Read advice>

Prompt #5: Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. Read advice>

Prompt #6: Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Read advice>

Prompt #7: Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you’ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. Read advice>

Admissions deadlines are approaching! Do you need more help navigating the college admissions process? Fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

The post How to Write a Strong Common App Essay appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Breaking Down the Scale Method for Weighted Averages [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2017, 11:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Breaking Down the Scale Method for Weighted Averages
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Before you dive into this post, make sure you are are familiar with the Scale Method for weighted averages, which we have discussed in previous posts.

We know that the scale formula of weighted averages is the following:

w1/w2 = (A2 – Aavg)/(Aavg – A1)

One point of confusion for many test takers regarding this formula is figuring out what A1, A2, w1 and w2 actually are.

Here is the simple answer: they can be anything. You can choose to set up the solution as you want. The only thing is that it must be consistent across. A1 and w1 could be the parameters of either solution; A2 and w2 will be the parameters of the other solution. We could also work with the concentration of either ingredient of the solution. We will illustrate this point with an example GMAT question:

A container holds 4 quarts of alcohol and 4 quarts of water. How many quarts of water must be added to the container to create a mixture that is 3 parts alcohol to 5 parts water by volume?

(A) 4/3

(B) 5/3

(C) 7/3

(D) 8/3

(E) 10/3

Now, we have been given two solutions that we have to mix:

  • A container holding 4 quarts of alcohol and 4 quarts of water
  • Water (which means it has no alcohol in it)
When these solutions are mixed together, they give us a mixture that is 3 parts alcohol to 5 parts water by volume.

So, what are A1, w1, A2, w2 and Aavg? We can work with the concentration of either alcohol or water. Let’s first see how we can work with the concentration of water:

Method 1:

A1 is the concentration of water in the solution of 4 quarts of alcohol and 4 quarts of water. So A1 = 4/8.

w1 is the volume of this solution.

A2 is the concentration of water in the solution of water only. So A2 = 8/8 (we want to write this in the same format that we write A1 in.)

w2 is the volume of this solution.

Aavg is the concentration of water in the final solution i.e. 5/8

w1/w2 = (A2 – Aavg)/(Aavg – A1)

w1/w2 = (8/8 – 5/8)/(5/8 – 4/8)

w1/w2 = 3/1

So 3 parts of the solution with alcohol and water should be mixed with 1 part of pure water.

Method 2:

A1 is the concentration of water in pure water. So A1 is 8/8

w1 is the volume of this solution.

A2 is the concentration of water in the solution of 4 quarts alcohol and 4 quarts water. So A2 is 4/8

w2 is the volume of this solution.

Aavg is the concentration of water in the final solution i.e. 5/8

w1/w2 = (A2 – Aavg)/(Aavg – A1)

w1/w2 = (4/8 – 5/8)/(5/8 – 8/8)

w1/w2 = 1/3

So 1 part of water should be mixed with 3 parts of the solution with alcohol and water (same result as above).

Now we will see how to work with the concentration of alcohol. Of course the result will be the same.

Method 3:

A1 is the concentration of alcohol in the solution of 4 quarts alcohol and 4 quarts water. So A1 is 4/8.

w1 is the volume of this solution.

A2 is the concentration of alcohol in the solution of water only. So A2 is 0/8 (to write in the same way as above)

w2 is the volume of this solution.

Aavg is the concentration of alcohol in the final solution i.e. 3/8

w1/w2 = (A2 – Aavg)/(Aavg – A1)

w1/w2 = (0/8 – 3/8)/(3/8 – 4/8)

w1/w2 = 3/1

So 3 parts of the solution with alcohol and water should be mixed with 1 part of pure water (same as above).

Method 4:

A1 is the concentration of alcohol in pure water. So A1 is 0/8

w1 is the volume of this solution.

A2 is the concentration of alcohol in the solution of 4 quarts alcohol and 4 quarts water. So A2 is 4/8.

w2 is the volume of this solution.

Aavg is the concentration of alcohol in the final solution i.e. 3/8

w1/w2 = (A2 – Aavg)/(Aavg – A1)

w1/w2 = (4/8 – 3/8)/(3/8 – 0/8)

w1/w2 = 1/3

So 1 part of pure water should be mixed with 3 parts of the solution with alcohol and water (same result as above).

Hope there will be no confusion about this in future.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? Check out one of our many free GMAT resources to get a jump start on your GMAT prep. And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter for more helpful tips like this one!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Breaking Down the Scale Method for Weighted Averages appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Why We Need to Redraw GMAT Geometry Figures [#permalink]

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New post 08 Dec 2017, 11:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Why We Need to Redraw GMAT Geometry Figures
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Many test takers, though good at Math find Data Sufficiency difficult. They are much more used to the straight forward Problem Solving pattern. The very principles behind the two question types are very different.

In Problem Solving questions, our target is to find just one solution. For example, when we have questions involving percentages, we assume some values and get the answer. No matter what values we assume, we will always get the same answer as long as the integrity of the data is maintained.

In Data Sufficiency questions, our target is to find multiple possible solutions  after using all the given data and arrive at answer (E). If we are unable to find more than 1 solution using either statement (1) and/or statement (2), we arrive at answers (A), (B), (C) or (D).

The aim is diametrically opposite in the two cases. Therefore, our strategies in the two cases would also be different and they are. Consider Geometry questions with figures in them. In Problem Solving questions, we try to make the figures as symmetrical as possible under the given constraints. With symmetrical figures, it is easier to get an answer. One answer is all we need.

In Data Sufficiency questions, we try to make the figures as extreme as possible. Only the given data should hold in such a figure and no symmetry should exist in the other dimensions. Only then will we be able to really figure out whether the given information is enough to arrive at a unique answer.

Let’s explain this using two examples:

Problem Solving Question

 

PSvsDSQuesPS1.jpg ********************************

 

In the figure above, the area of square PQRS is 64. What is the area of triangle QRT?

(A) 48

(B) 32

(C) 24

(D) 16

(E) 8

This is a Problem Solving question.

All we are given is that PQRS is a square. Note that the location of point T is not defined. It is just any point on side PS. We can place it anywhere we like as long as it is on PS. At what point will it be easy for us to calculate the area of triangle QRT? Of course, T could be the middle point of PS (bringing in symmetry) and we could calculate the area of the triangle or we could make it coincide with S so that QRT is a right triangle half of square PQRS. Then, the area of triangle QRT will simply be half of 64, i.e. 32.

Note that we don’t necessarily need to do this. We can assume T to be a random point, drop an altitude from T to QR, find that the length of the altitude will be same as the side of the square, find that side of the square will be √(64) = 8 and area of triangle QRT will be (1/2)*8*8 = 32

We will arrive at the same answer of course! But, assuming a better position for point T (but only because it is not defined) will cut the calculations and help us arrive directly at 32 from 64.

Data Sufficiency Question

 

PSvsDSQuesDS1.jpg ********************************

 

If AD is 6 and ADC is a right angle, what is the area of triangular region ABC?

Statement 1: Angle ABD = 60°

Statement 2: AC = 12

Looking at the figure, many test takers are tempted to think that the altitude AD will bisect BC. Note that that may not be the case.

According to the data given in the question stem alone, the figure could very well look something like this:

 

PSvsDSQuesDS2.jpg ********************************

 

All we know is that ADC is a right angle and the length of the altitude is 6. We don’t know whether any of the sides are equal, etc. Hence, it is a good idea to redraw the figure with extreme proportions – one side much greater than the other.

Now we can use the given statements to re-adjust the proportions.

Area of triangle ABC = (1/2)*AD*BC

We know that AD is 6. But we don’t know BC. Let’s examine each of the statements separately.

Statement 1: Angle ABD = 60°

This statement tells us that triangle ABD is a 30-60-90 triangle. Knowing the length of AD will give us the length of the other two sides too. But here is the problem – to know BC, we need to know length of CD too. That we cannot find from this statement alone. This statement alone is not sufficient to answer the question.

Statement 2: AC = 12

We know that ADC is a right angled triangle. Knowing AC and AD, we can find the length of CD using Pythagorean Theorem. But we cannot find BD using this statement and that is needed to get the length of BC. This statement alone is also not sufficient to answer the question.

Using both statements, we can find the lengths of both BD and CD, and hence, can find the length of BC. This will give us the area of the triangle. Therefore, our answer is C.

Note here that if we mistakenly assume that D is the mid point of BC, we might come to the conclusion that each statement alone is sufficient and might mark the answer as D, instead of C. Hence, it is a good idea to redraw the given figure in a Data Sufficiency question to ensure that it has as little symmetry as possible.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? Check out one of our many free GMAT resources to get a jump start on your GMAT prep. And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter for more helpful tips like this one!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

 

The post Why We Need to Redraw GMAT Geometry Figures appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Marisa

Veritas Prep | Veritas Prep Representative

Save $100 on live Veritas Prep GMAT Courses

Veritas Prep Reviews

Kudos [?]: 171 [0], given: 2

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