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School Profile: Is the Liberal Arts Lifestyle at Colby Colle [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2014, 09:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: School Profile: Is the Liberal Arts Lifestyle at Colby College Right for You?
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Colby College, a private liberal arts school, is set high atop Mayflower Hill overlooking picturesque Waterville, Maine. The 714-acre Georgian Revival-style campus is home to the nation’s first college-based anti-slavery society, first Greek society, and was the first to enroll women. Colby College is the 12th oldest liberal arts college in the United States, and today serves around 1,800 students. Campus highlights include a 128-acre arboretum and wildlife refuge, a student-run organic garden that produces two tons of vegetables annually, the largest American art museum in Maine, and a biomass-fueled heating facility that makes Colby one of four carbon-neutral colleges in the country. Colby College ranks #50 among schools in the Veritas Prep Elite College Rankings.

Colby College has a unique 4-1-4 academic calendar that features two semesters separated by a winter session called “Jan Plan,” which is an opportunity for a single focused experience from hundreds of choices like a travel course, internship, research, field study, or an intensive course. Three Jan Plan sessions are required, however, most students love them enough to do four.

There are 55 majors and 31 minors from 38 academic departments at Colby; many students pursue double majors, and over half pursue a major/minor combination. The most popular degrees are social sciences, multi/interdisciplinary studies, biological and biomedical sciences, and English language and literature. Students can also participate in dual-degree programs in engineering with Columbia University or Dartmouth College.

The Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement offers a plethora of opportunities for learning from thought leaders in civic engagement, debate, and service. The Peace Corps ranked Colby College among the top 25 colleges with the most Peace Corps volunteers. If you are driven to connect with like-minded people around issues of social justice, civic engagement, and environmental stewardship, Colby is a good choice.

Campus life at Colby College is guided by the Colby 360 residential plan that promotes principles of life skills development, human diversity, civic responsibility, healthy living, and leadership. All residence halls, except one, are coed and integrate all four classes of students. Students can further choose from specialty housing or dialogue housing.

Colby offers three dining halls to students during the academic sessions; Dana, Foss, and Roberts. Each has its own personality and menus are posted on the college website to help you decide where your next meal will be. The Joseph Family Spa at the Pulver Pavilion in Cotter Student Union offers students salads, sandwiches, beverages, and desserts for sale. The Caporale Lounge, also located in the Pavilion, has boxed lunch offerings that are part of the student meal plan. The Marchese Blue Light Pub provides appetizers and alcoholic beverages for students who are over 21. Monday through Wednesday, students who are under 21 may order late night non-alcoholic beverages and snacks.

Colby College athletes play on one of 16 men’s and 17 women’s NCAA Division III teams in the New England Small College Athletic Conference, one of the toughest D3 conferences in the country. White Mule student-athletes have earned titles in alpine skiing, basketball, and crew. Colby consistently produces All American Division III athletes across a number of sports. The school’s primary football rival is Bates College, a fellow Consortium school.

Colby has a number of state-of-the-art athletic facilities on and off campus. The College also offers club sports, and iPlay is the active intramural program. Colby athletics has been supported by C Club, an organization of alumni and others, for over 100 years. The Colby Magazine helps keep students and alumni connected with Colby’s rich history, alumni achievements, and current news.

Traditions at Colby college include raucous cafeteria tray sledding. Every Colby student is expected to steal a cafeteria tray from one of the dining halls to sled down Chapel Hill at least once in their college career. As you might expect, they go super-fast, so be careful! Doghead is a Colby tradition around St. Patrick’s Day that is an all-day drinking extravaganza. Loudness Weekends are music and party events at the beginning and end of each semester. Mr. Colby is an annual beauty pageant featuring male student contestants. First prize is Mr. Colby, second is Mr. Bates, and third goes to Mr. Bodoin. On a more serious note, the Miller Steps in front of Miller Library mark the beginning and end of a student’s academic career at Colby. New arrivals gather there for a welcoming event, and four years later, commencement exercises are held there.

If you consider yourself socially conscious and you want to help make the world a better place, you prefer the intimacy of a small college, and you thrive in a challenging academic environment, keep Colby College on your list.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Top MBA Programs with Application Deadlines and Essays for t [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2014, 11:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Top MBA Programs with Application Deadlines and Essays for the 2014-2015 Application Season
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Business school application season is among us. You are working hard to find the right references for letters of recommendation, get GMAT scores up, and finalize your essays.

Let us save you some time!

Here are the application deadlines and essays for the coming 2014-2015 application season for many of the top MBA programs.

 

Harvard Business School: Round 1 Deadline – September 9, 2014

Stanford GSB: Round 1 Deadline – October 1, 2014

The Wharton School: Round 1 Deadline – October 1, 2014

Columbia Business School: January 2015 Entry – October 8, 2015

MIT Sloan: Round 1 Deadline – September 23, 2014

Michigan’s Ross School of Business: Round 1 Deadline – October 6, 2014

Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business: Early Action – October 8, 2014

Fuqua School of Business at Duke University: Early Action – September 17, 2014

Kellogg School of Management: Round 1 Deadline – September 24, 2014

Booth School of Business: Round 1 Deadline – September 25, 2014

NYU Stern: Round 1 Deadline – October 15, 2014

Check back soon for UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, Yale School of Management, and UCLA Anderson.

Learn more about these schools in our Essential Guides. If you want help crafting the perfect application, call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today. Click here to take our Free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

By Colleen Hill
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How to Approach Mimic the Reasoning GMAT Questions [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2014, 09:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Approach Mimic the Reasoning GMAT Questions
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The GMAT is known to be a demanding exam. Most students recognize that a lot of preparation is required in order to get the best score possible. Most students undertaking the GMAT are also used to studying for tests and have worked out their own strategies and their own methods of preparation. Indeed, people overwhelmingly study the GMAT in an orderly and structured way. This is a positive thing, but it can have its drawbacks.

Usually, order is a positive thing that gives structure to what we’re doing. Today I’m studying reading comprehension, tomorrow I will study algebra. This method allows our brains to classify different concepts and keep them neatly separated in our minds. The alternative is to have things haphazardly stored in our memories and try to recall the information as it comes up. It’s the same principle as a library. If the books are stored by alphabetical order, then it’s easy to find the book you’re looking for (say Fifty Shades of Gray), whereas a pile of books scattered on the floor may or may not contain the book you want.

However, with this order comes some level of compartmentalization, which can be problematic on compound problems. For example, if a question deals with geometry, it may also contain some elements of algebra. Typically, when you see a triangle, your brain is busy scanning through the properties it recognizes (area, isosceles rules, etc), and doesn’t bother with perfect squares or exponent rules. More difficult questions require you to combine seemingly disparate concepts and utilize them on the same question. This becomes difficult because it breaks the order we’ve neatly established and requires us to sometimes jumble information.

This phenomenon is not limited to math problems. Indeed, it shows up very frequently on “Mimic the Reasoning” questions, in which we’re asked to construct a similar argument to the one in the question stem. The problem is the logic is almost never in the same order in the answer choices as in the question stem. Let’s review one and see how we can approach these questions:

Some political observers believe that the only reason members of the state’s largest union supported Senator Hughes in his recent re-election campaign was that the union’s leaders must have been assured by Hughes that, if elected, he would stay out of their coming negotiations with the union’s national leadership, whose members have been financial backers of several close associates of Hughes. More likely, the union’s members believed that Hughes deserved to serve another term in office.

Which of the following best parallels the method of argument used by the author?

(A) The popularity of Deap, a powerful carpet cleaning system that can be used by the homeowner is, some industry observers say, due to an agreement made by a leading professional carpet cleaning company to supply Deap with the chemicals that are sold as accessories. This does not, however, fully explain the sudden popularity of the product in the last three months.

(B) After a rocky start, Shade, a new cosmetics line, is now selling briskly. The reason for the turnaround is almost certainly that Shade is now being marketed to women in their twenties, not just to teens. This has helped the product achieve a more sophisticated appeal, which has translated into greater sales in every age group.

(C) The Shakelight, a small flashlight that can be powered for several minutes by a shaking motion, has once again proven a popular gift item this holiday season. Other similar devices are available, but none has been as successful, and the reason is simple: the cost of The Shakelight has fluctuated so that it has always been at least one dollar less than that of any competitor. The manufacturers’ claim that they have a better product is nonsense.

(D) The continued success of the Daddo line of toys is due to the simple appeal that these toys have for kids between three years of age and six. Others disagree. One industry journal ascribed the brand’s popularity to a deal made with a major toy retailer guaranteeing that the retailer would carry the coming line of Daddo products exclusively for three months.

(E) As with last year, this year’s best selling foreign policy journal is World Opinion. It may be that the content in World Opinion is simply more exhaustive and better presented than that of similar publications, or it may be that the journal’s publishers have the substantial support of their parent company, which has been a good friend to bookstores and other outlets.

One of the uncontestable issues with a question like this is that it’s very long. A quick word count reveals that this question is over 400 words, but thankfully we’re skimming the answer choices looking for a match to the original argument. The passage states that there are two potential reasons for the re-election of a certain Senator, one that’s more conspiracy-oriented and one that’s more straight forward (we may want Occam’s Razor for this). We must now peruse the other answer choices looking for a similar pattern of reasoning.

Answer choice A only gives one explanation and then elaborates on how this may not actually be correct because it doesn’t explain everything. No alternative is given. The logic is not the same and therefore this choice can be eliminated.

Answer choice B similarly gives one explanation and then defends it as the only plausible choice. While this is a reasonable logic to follow, it does not mimic that of the passage.

Answer choice C is a little closer. The Shakelight is known to be a popular gift, and there is one reason given. Another possible reason is mentioned, but ignored out of hand because it is preposterous. This choice at least presents the illusion of two possibilities, even if one of them is never seriously considered. The logic is not the same as the original passage, but it is closer than the two previous choices.

Answer choice D is essentially the same logic as that of the passage. Two possible choices are given, and one is more likely than the other. Both choices are considered, even if one choice is given more credence. This is a good match to the original passage and answer choice D is the correct answer.

For completion’s sake, let’s also look at answer choice E. This logic is not that far from the original, but it is in the opposite direction from answer choice C. Two possibilities are given, but neither one is decreed to be more likely than the other. This logic is again similar to the original passage, but not exactly the same.

This question somewhat mirrors the goldilocks parable. Answer choice E postulates that either possibility could be good (too big), while answer choice C completely disregards the second option (too small). Only answer choice D (just right) correctly mirrors the logic in the original passage, albeit in a different order. It is important on the GMAT to be able to see the logic in the statements, even if it’s presented in a different order than you’re used to. The exam rewards those test takers who demonstrate mental agility and can correctly decode order from the chaos.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Ron Awad is a GMAT instructor for Veritas Prep based in Montreal, bringing you weekly advice for success on your exam.  After graduating from McGill and receiving his MBA from Concordia, Ron started teaching GMAT prep and his Veritas Prep students have given him rave reviews ever since.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Get Creative on Your College Essay: Part 4 [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2014, 10:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Get Creative on Your College Essay: Part 4
ImageLet’s get back to getting creative on your college essay. First take a look at Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 of this blog series. Once you have brainstormed, refined your ideas, and finally gotten them down on the page, the most taxing part of the creative process is arguably behind you. No longer must you stare into the infinite void of a blank page. However, the fun doesn’t end with the first draft.

The finished product you ultimately send to the college admissions committees ought to be something you are proud of. Not only are you communicating to the college about your background, life experience, and perspective, you are demonstrating how adept you are as a writer—a skill that happens to be immeasurably important for any college student.

On the most basic level, your essay must be polished and wholly devoid of grammar and spelling errors. These sorts of errors can be “automatic fails” when it comes to the college essay, but they can be easily fixed with careful review (your computer’s spell check is far from sufficient).

More importantly, you will need to transform the rough-draft content of your essay into a more coherent, well structured, engaging piece of writing without losing your personal voice and narrative style. How can this be done? One of the best ways to see whether your draft makes sense is to show it to another reader. Many college counselors recommend showing it to people who know you well because they will be able to tell how well the essay reflects you as a person.

However, beware of feedback and be sure to stay true to your voice. The people who know you have an outsider perspective on what you are like. In other words, they know what it is to know you, but not to be you. As a result, they can steer you in a direction that isn’t as genuine as your work originally was. The more people that offer their opinions on your essay, the greater the risk of your essay being taken in multiple, perhaps conflicting directions. When you show your essay to a reader, no matter who it is or how trusting you are of their opinions, listen to their advice with a critical ear. You’re writing your own story and are the best judge of how it ought to be told.

When reading over your essays, make sure to be equally critical of word choice and the way your paragraphs are structured. In all likelihood, your finished product will have morphed time and time again from the initial seed that was your rough draft.

I leave you with a quote. Walt Whitman was a firm believer in the importance of maintaining the self and identity:

“Not I, nor anyone else can travel that road for you.

You must travel it by yourself.

It is not far. It is within reach.”

- Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

Best of luck to you in your college application process!

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Michael Rothberg is a Veritas Prep SAT instructor. He began tutoring his freshman year of college and is excited to help students conquer the SAT by unlocking their academic potential. Currently a rising sophomore at Harvard University, he is a Cognitive Neuroscience and Evolutionary Psychology major and Staff Reporter at the Harvard Crimson.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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GMAT Tip of the Week: The 2 Most Important Lessons You Will  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2014, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: The 2 Most Important Lessons You Will Learn from Mrs. Doubtfire
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For those considering higher education this week, Robin Williams’ memory looms large. The lessons he taught in Dead Poets’ Society and Good Will Hunting have made their way around the internet more quickly and in more contexts than even Williams’ genie character from Aladdin could throw out references.

But for GMAT test-takers, perhaps the greatest lessons a Robin Williams character can teach come from Mrs. Doubtfire.

 

Mrs. Doubtfire Lesson One: Look at Verbs! 

Why was Mrs. Doubtfire even called Mrs. Doubtfire? Fans of the movie will remember – when Williams’ character was on the phone applying to be the nanny for his children, he needed a fake name and looked at the newspaper on the table. The San Francisco Chronicle headline that caught his eye: Police Doubt Fire Was Accidental.

And your favorite movie from your childhood could have been called “Mrs. Firewas” or “Mrs. Accidental” or even “Mrs. Crumrise” (trivia question: what was the name of the author of that article?). But Robin Williams – once an English teacher at a New England prep school, then a professor at MIT – knew what GMAT test-takers need to know on Sentence Correction:

Look for the verb.

He looked for the verb – “doubt” – and hence movie history was made. Mrs. Doubtfire became an instant classic, and if you’d like to meteorically rise to prominence at elite New England schools like so many Williams characters, you, too, should learn to look for the verb. Why? Because verbs come with two extremely common and extremely actionable GMAT decision points: verb tense and subject-verb agreement. You can become an expert on those two items much more easily than you can become an expert on other, more nuanced facets of grammar, so look for the verb first. For example:

So devastating the fire, so specific its victim, that police doubt the fire was accidental.

(A) So devastating the fire, so specific its victim, that police doubt the fire was accidental.

(B) The fire was so devastating and had such a specific victim that police doubts the fire was accidental.

(C) So devastating was the fire and its specific victim that police doubted it is accidental.

(D) So devastating the fire, so specific its victim, that police had doubted it accidentally.

(E) The fire was so devastating, its victim so specific, that police doubts it was accidental.

If you read this sentence from left to right, you may well dislike the initial wording (So X, So Y, that…) and try to fix that. But you’re likely not an expert on “unique grammatical structures” – the structure in the original sentence is, indeed, valid (called anaphora). But you don’t need to know that, either – if you look to the verbs (doubt/doubts/doubted and was/is) toward the right hand side of each answer choices, you’ll notice that B and E screw up the subject-verb agreement and C and D botch the tense/timeline. The verb decisions are much easier to make than the structure decision, and if you use the verbs properly the only structure left is A. So learn from Mrs. Doubtfire – look for the verb!

Mrs. Doubtfire Lesson Two: GMAT Questions Often Dress In Drag (or at least in disguise).

Just as Robin Williams donned a mask, wig, and dress in order to appear more kind, friendly, and nurturing, so many GMAT questions are designed to look calming and “easy” when in fact they’re quite difficult. So while your instinct when you see an “easy” problem may well be to rush through it and create some doubt about how you’re performing on the computer-adaptive test, make sure you keep Mrs. Doubtfire in the back of your mind – the question that seems like Mary Poppins might actually be a little darker and scarier (like Williams’ character in One Hour Photo). Paraphrasing Williams’ Good Will Hunting co-star Matt Damon in his Rounders role “if you can’t spot the sucker in the first short while, you probably are the sucker.” Meaning that easy questions – those you might see as absolutely no problem and be able to answer in 30 seconds or so – may deserve a second look. Behind that comforting exterior might well be a trickier question (or your ex-husband who hates Pierce Brosnan).

Consider as an example:

Because he’s taxed by his home planet, Mork pays a tax rate of 40% on his income, while Mindy pays a rate of only 30% on hers. If Mindy earned 3 times as much as Mork did, what was their combined tax rate?

(A) 32.5%

(B) 34%

(C) 35%

(D) 36%

(E) 37.5%

If your mind immediately thought “the average of 30% and 40% is 35% – C!” you’re not alone…but you may be falling for the old Mrs. Doubtfire routine, mistaking a more-difficult question for one that’s sweet, nurturing, and easy. Because Mork & Mindy don’t earn the same amount, their average must be weighted, meaning that the correct answer is A (since Mindy’s income carries 3/4 of the weight, the weighted average will be 3/4 of the way toward her income). And the lesson – when a GMAT question seems a bit too easy, don’t merely assume that it’s easy and that you’re doing poorly. Think about Mrs. Doubtfire playing soccer in the park and Aerosmith singing “Dude Looks Like Lady” (or “Hard Looks Like It’s Easy”…same rhythm) and see if you’re falling for a hard problem disguised as an easy one.

Robin Williams will be remembered for the many ways he inspired us and the many lessons he taught us. While, sadly, you won’t be able to have a conversation with him on a park bench in Boston Common, remembering his Mrs. Doubtfire character on the GMAT will help you on your quest to find similarly-inspiring professors of your own.

Thank you, O’ Captain.

Are you studying for the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

By Brian Galvin
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How to Go from a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part IV [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2014, 09:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Go from a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part IV
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To take a look at the previous posts of this thread, check: Part I, Part II and Part III.

Another point to keep in mind while targeting Q50+ in GMAT: don’t buy complex official solutions. Most GMAT questions can be solved in a few steps. The point is that sometimes it is hard to identify those “few steps” and we keep going round and round in circles for a while till we arrive at the answer. The way to hit 51 is to look for simple solutions for difficult questions. The best example of this would be question number 148 of Official Guide 12. The question is tough, no doubt about it but just because it is tough, don’t think that the solution needs to be tough too – you don’t have to live with the solution provided.

If, even after reading the solution a couple of times, you know that if you try the question again in a week, you won’t be able to solve it on your own, this means you need to review either the concept or the solution. If the given solution is too complex and you almost have to learn it up step by step, it means you need a better solution. The next step of the solution should be apparent to you – you should be able to solve it on your own within two minutes.

Also, even if one method looks good, try to find other ways of solving the question. Often, there are multiple good ways of solving a particular question.

Here is a question similar to question number 148 of OG12. Let me give a few good methods of solving it:

Question: If x, y, and k are positive numbers such that {x/(x+y)}*20 + {y/(x+y)}*40 = k, and if x < y, which of the following could be the value of k?

(A) 15

(B) 20

(C) 25

(D) 35

(E) 40

Solution: One solution you have in the OG. Three more are provided here:

Method 2: Algebra

Note the “could be” in the question. This means that k can take multiple values and one of them is provided here.

20*x/(x+y) + 40*y/(x+y) = k

20(x+2y)/(x+y) = k

20*{(x + y)/(x + y) + y/(x + y)} = k

20*{ 1 + y/(x + y)} = k

Now since y is greater than x,  y/x+y  will be more than 1/2 but definitely less than 1 (x and y are positive numbers).

So the value of k will lie in the range 20*{1 + 1/2} < k < 20*{1 + 1}

i.e. 30 < k < 40

Only option (D) falls in this range.

Answer (D)

Method 3: Weighted Average

Does this equation remind you of something: 20*x/(x+y) + 40*y/(x+y) = k?

If you are a weighted average fan like me, you will notice that this is just the weighted average formula applied:

Cavg = (C1*w1 + C2*w2)/(w1 + w2)

Where Cavg = k

C1 = 20

C2 = 40

w1 = x

w2 = y

k = (20*x + 40*y)/(x + y)

It might be hard to see this on your own but the point is that if you do see it, the return is very high.

We know that the average of two quantities will lie in between them. So k must lie between 20 and 40. Also, we are given that x is less than y i.e. weight given to 20 is less than the weight given to 40. So the weighted average will lie toward 40. Between 30 and 40, there is only option (D)

Hence, answer (D).

Method 4: Plugging Numbers

Now, what if neither of the above given methods work for you during the test and your mind goes blank? Then you can pick some numbers to get an idea of the kind of values you will get. This is absolute brute force and may not always work out but it will give you a fighting chance of getting the correct answer.

20*x/(x+y) + 40*y/(x+y) = k

- Say, x = 1, y = 3 (x and y are positive numbers and x < y)

Then 20*1/(1+3) + 40*3/(1+3) = k = 35

- Say, x = 2, y = 3 (when you assume numbers, assume those which make the denominator a factor of 20 and 40 for ease of calculations. So assume numbers such that x+y is 4 or 5 or 10 etc)

Then 20*2/(2+3) + 40*3/(2+3) = k = 32

- Say, x = 1, y = 4

Then 20*1/(1+4) + 40*4/(1+4) = k = 36

Even if you do not get 35, note that the other values of k lie in the 30s. So your best bet would be to mark answer as (D).

Hope you see that there are many different ways of solving a given question, so you don’t usually require complex solutions. Practice on!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!
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School Profile: Develop Your Own Academic Path at Hamilton C [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2014, 13:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: School Profile: Develop Your Own Academic Path at Hamilton College
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The college motto, Know Thyself, succinctly demonstrates the philosophy of education at Hamilton College. The core belief is that all students should explore their individuality and develop an academic path that leads to their greatest expression in the world.  Ranked #41 among colleges on the Veritas Prep Elite College Rankings, Hamilton College was chartered in 1812 and named after statesman Alexander Hamilton, one of its first Board of Trustees members. The beautiful 1,350 acre campus sits high on a hill overlooking the quaint village of Clinton, New York.

Over 1,800 students pursue Bachelor of Arts degrees in over 50 areas of study at Hamilton College. What is unique about the Hamilton academic philosophy is that they put the responsibility for course selection squarely on the shoulders of students. While each student is given an academic advisor to help them see the connections between disciplines and offer guidance, there is no required core curriculum that students must follow other than three writing intensive courses specific to their chosen field of study. Their reasoning for this approach is that students are choosing classes that make sense to them and move them toward their personal educational goals, therefore their attendance in class and what they get from their education is personalized and self-motivating.

Students may also choose hands-on internships from among three off-campus destinations: Washington, D.C., New York City, and Boston. Hamilton has international affiliates for study abroad in China, France, Spain, and India where students can choose immersion in the academic and cultural opportunities of their host school. The Hamilton promise to each student is, “At Hamilton you can study what interests you, be accepted for who you are and what you believe, and prepare to be the person you were meant to become.” The school boasts two Nobel laureates and 85 Fulbright recipients.

First year students at Hamilton have six housing choices among residence halls: Major, Keehn, South, North, Wallace Johnson, and Wertimer House. The college website has done an excellent job of giving an overview and personality description of the freshmen living choices, as well as details about the housing lottery system. Wertimer House houses 42 freshmen in 21 double rooms, so if you’re looking for immediate camaraderie with a small community, this could be a good option. There are also single-sex, substance-free, and other specialty housing options for students.

Greek housing does not exist on campus, although the Greek community thrives, but in an inclusive way. Greek parties are typically open to the entire campus. Students report that campus social life, like all aspects of life, is what you make it. The rural environment appeals to many students who feel it encourages community on campus; others, who are used to a more urban environment, could find it problematic. The Scroll is the school’s moderated social media aggregator, so students can keep up with what’s happening on campus.

Hamilton College is represented by 29 men’s and women’s NCAA Division III teams in the New England Small College Athletic Conference. In 2008, the women’s lacrosse team won the school’s first NCAA national title. Since then, Hamilton has accumulated 14 national titles, 13 of which are individual titles in track and field, swimming, and diving. Thirty percent of students participate in varsity, intramural, or club sports, even though it is not a requirement. This school offers the opportunity for student-athletes who play for the love of the game to continue playing through their college years at each of these levels. The Hamilton Continental’s biggest football rivalry is with Middlebury College. The winning team from the annual matchup takes home the Mac-Jack Rocking Chair.

Hamilton College traditions include the Citrus Bowl, which is the first hockey game of the season; FebFest, which is a mid-semester week-long music, food, and social event; and May Day Music Festival, which is an outdoor music festival. Each school year ends with Class and Charter Day, and the accompanying HamTrek tradition. On the last day of classes there is a campus-wide party with a picnic and school sponsored concert. HamTrek is a swim-bike-run triathlon on Class and Charter Day where students participate for prizes; it is also a charitable event that benefits the Shawn Grady Memorial Fund.

If you are looking for a college where you can be yourself and feel fully supported, you appreciate a small campus in a rural environment, and you know what you want out of your education, Hamilton College could be a good match for you.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
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School Profile: Are You the Next Boston College Academic Ath [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2014, 09:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: School Profile: Are You the Next Boston College Academic Athlete?
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Boston College is #53 among the Veritas Prep Elite College Rankings. Located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, its campus is often referred to as “the Heights” due to its hilltop location and Collegiate Gothic architecture that includes the iconic Gasson Tower. Founded by the Society of Jesus in 1863, Boston College is a private research university dedicated to the traditions of its Jesuit Catholic origins where research, academic exchange, faith, and culture intersect.

Students enrolling as undergraduates at Boston College can choose majors from among five schools, College of Arts and Sciences (34), Lynch School of Education (3), Carroll School of Management (12), Connell School of Nursing (1), Woods College of Advancing Studies (14), or interdisciplinary programs (18). Twenty academic majors across both undergraduate and graduate schools have an international focus in keeping with the global Jesuit liberal arts tradition since the 16th century. The most popular majors by enrollment are economics, communications, and biology. The student faculty ratio is 1:14, and 94% of the faculty have doctoral degrees.

Students can take advantage of eight research libraries on Boston College campus. When you need a place to do all that late night studying, you will want to make your way to the study tables of Gargan Hall on the second floor of Bapst Library, the fine arts library. They’re open 24 hours a day Thursdays through Sundays and are regarded as the quietest place on campus. The bonus is the hall’s Harry Potter style Gothic environment.

There are fewer than 10,000 undergraduates on campus at Boston College of which 85% live on campus. Freshmen are required to live on campus; most options are 2-person rooms, although there are some singles and some with three or four students per unit. Freshmen female students can apply to The Women’s Experience in Kostka Hall on Upper Campus. Any freshman can apply to the Shaw Leadership Program in Shaw House, or the Multicultural Learning Experience floors. Other options include Healthy Alternatives for substance-free living, or Honors House for honor students. There is no Greek life on campus.

There are regular dining hall options on campus plus specialty choices like Hillside Café for Starbucks and sandwiches, Eagle’s Nest deli in McElroy, organic food at The Loft in Corcoran, The Shack for outdoor dining—also in Corcoran, The Chocolate Bar in Stokes Hall serving Peet’s coffees and teas plus every chocolaty dessert you can think of, and three On The Fly mini-marts. You’ll never go hungry at Boston College.

The NCAA Division I Boston College Eagles compete on 14 men’s and 17 women’s teams, most of which are played in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The football team has won a number of bowl games in the past, won one national title, and produced over 20 NFL players including Doug Flutie and Matt Ryan. Men’s basketball made the NCAA Elite Eight three times. Men’s hockey teams are five time National Champions. Women’s basketball made the NCAA Sweet 16 three times. Boston College athletes are also often among the most academically successful in the country.

Boston College has ten athletic facilities for competitive sports including Alumni Stadium and Conte Forum. A 144,000-square-foot recreation center serves Boston College students and offers tennis, racquetball, fitness, aquatics, and more. The Flynn Recreational Complex also offers 21 club sports and intramurals for students who want to play competitive sports, but not at the varsity level.

Other than the Jesuit tradition of the school, Boston College doesn’t seem to be big on unofficial or frivolous traditions. They have a fight song and a mascot like most colleges, but other than sports traditions, this isn’t an area where the school or student body focus attention. The Boston College Marching Band performs pre-game concerts called “Peptacular!” on the steps of Conte Forum; they perform a pre-game show inside the stadium, lead the enthusiasm in the stands during the games, and play the alma mater at the end of games. One of the oldest unofficial traditions at Boston College is taking the 16-hour trip in a fan RV from Boston to South Bend, Indiana for football game day against Notre Dame.

If you are looking for an academically strong research university dedicated to its Irish Catholic roots in the ultimate college town, Boston College could be just the place for you.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
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You Should Apply for Early Action to Business School If... [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2014, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: You Should Apply for Early Action to Business School If...
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Here’s a good, basic rule of thumb for when during the application season you should apply to b-school:  go for round one if you can, but only if your application is at its best.  This rule will serve you well, particularly if you fall into either one of two categories:  you have several different schools you would be thrilled to get into, and you consider yourself to be a fairly competitive candidate.

If, however, you have one school you favor very strongly and/or if you feel you have weaknesses in your application which could potentially hinder your chances, you should take a serious look at a third option which often flies under the radar for many applicants:  the early action deadline.  What is early action?  Not every school offers it, but those that do, provide “extra consideration” for candidates who 1) apply early in the process (typically a few weeks before round one), and 2) can commit to attending their program if they are offered admission.

The rules are different for various schools who offer this option, ranging from a requirement that all other applications be withdrawn upon an offer of admission, to simply posting a tuition deposit to reserve your spot, which would be forfeited if you change your mind.  Checking with each school individually about this is important, since you definitely don’t want to hinder your chances at other schools, particularly if you ended up getting into your reach school.

But if you would be happy attending University X and you feel you could benefit from some of this “extra consideration” for making a commitment up front, you could really be pleasantly surprised by leveraging early action.  The bonus upshot?  You find out far before your friends whether or not you are admitted, which makes for a much more relaxing holiday season at yearend.

So let’s summarize the when to apply strategy.   Go for round one if your application is ready and you want to take a chance on your dream school, or go for round two if you feel delaying your application will make it better, and go for early action if you can muster a firm commitment to your chosen school and you could also use a bit of special attention in the process due to a weakness.

One final note:  early action is definitely not a way for underqualified candidates to gain admission to schools for which they would normally not have a chance.  It’s simply a way to tease out an offer from a school which prefers to book applicants early and therefore avoid the dreaded waiting game for folks to make up their minds on which school to pledge before the normal spring deposit deadline.

Learn about top MBA programs by downloading our Essential Guides! Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or click here to take our Free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter.

Scott Bryant has over 25 years of professional post undergraduate experience in the entertainment industry as well as on Wall Street with Goldman Sachs. He served on the admissions committee at the Fuqua School of Business where he received his MBA and now works part time in retirement for a top tier business school. He has been consulting with Veritas Prep clients for the past six admissions seasons. See more of his articles here.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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SAT Tip of the Week: How to Embrace Your Endurance During th [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2014, 09:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: How to Embrace Your Endurance During the Exam
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There are few tasks in life that require as much concentrated, uninterrupted, and intense focus as the SAT. In its current format, the test lasts 3 hours and 45 minutes. Even with the brief breaks during the exam, it can feel like a mental marathon. Like top endurance runners, you can use certain strategies to improve your performance and prevent your focus from wavering at any point during the test.

Given the stringent time limits, zoning out for even a minute can stunt your pace and cause you to hear “pencils down” before you’re finished. With a perfect score within reach, leaving questions blank that you otherwise could have answered will drain precious points from your score. Here’s a few strategies to stay on task during the SAT …

Keep an eye on the clock:

Even in the span of a 25-minute math section or even a 10-minute writing section, it’s easy to lose track of how much time you are spending on each question. Wear a wristwatch and quickly remind yourself when the section ends and is halfway over. This strategy serves two purposes: First, by checking in on the time periodically, you can adjust your pace accordingly. Second, and perhaps even more important, the act of checking your watch can momentarily interrupt the monotony of standardized testing which can keep your more alert.

Mind your own business:

When the proctor announces, “you may now begin,” there tends to be a mad rush to start the test, like horses out of the starting gates. The sounds of eager students vigorously flipping through their test booklets can certainly be nerve-wrenching, especially for first-time testers. It’s best to avoid looking around at the other students (a typical reaction to this initial testing scramble) and concentrate on your own test. Looking at your neighbors will only make you anxious, the proctor suspicious, and time run dry. A relaxed test taker is more focused and effective than an anxious one.

Stretch and walk around during breaks:

In general, during a long test like the SAT, when you’re not physically moving around, your mind begins to move around and drift off in random directions. Some deal with this by fidgeting, twirling their pencils or tapping their feet, but doing so can be noisy and distracting. Luckily, the folks at College Board mandated that there must be a few breaks during the testing session, which are the perfect times to get all your jitters out, stretch, and walk around.

Get more sleep:

This is probably something you’ve heard before many times, but that’s because it’s important. You must get enough sleep (≥ 8 hours) during the nights leading up to the test. No matter how much coffee you drink, sleep deprivation before the SAT is a recipe for disaster. Exhaustion clouds the mind, inhibits memory, stifles critical thinking, and hinders ambition, so why risk it?

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Michael Rothberg is a Veritas Prep SAT instructor. He began tutoring his freshman year of college and is excited to help students conquer the SAT by unlocking their academic potential. Currently a rising sophomore at Harvard University, he is a Cognitive Neuroscience and Evolutionary Psychology major and Staff Reporter at the Harvard Crimson.
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This Kind of Leadership Will Get You into Business School [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2014, 12:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: This Kind of Leadership Will Get You into Business School
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One of the most stressful moments in an applicant’s trek through the business school due diligence process is when they realize they have done very little engaging with anyone or anything outside of work.  Let’s face it—life gets busy, and while you may have been in every club and organization you could get your hands on in college, once out in the real world, you may have found it very easy to simply go to work and come home at night without doing much else.

Needless to say, this is not the kind of “next generation of leadership” the top schools are seeking to fill their seats.  Business schools desire to build a body of students who are able to make an impact both at work and in their community.  In fact, it’s not even really enough to be a volunteer anymore.  Business schools ideally will see strategic leadership outside of your day job where you have demonstrated a high level of impact and a lasting mark on someone, something or someplace.

This doesn’t necessarily mean you must be Chairman of the Board in a local non-profit, or a city councilman, although those things can sometimes give you an edge, by proving that you not only take the time, but are also recognized by others in the community as a leader.  Schools know it’s all too easy to run out and volunteer at a soup kitchen or hand out cups of water in the local 5K race.  What they are looking for is your being involved, deeply involved in some area you care about and in the process, have influenced or impacted an organization.

If you think about it, it’s actually easier sometimes to do this than it is to lead in the workplace.  Volunteer or community organizations are hungry for people who are willing to devote time, energy and ideas.  If you do this, you will likely find yourself quickly rising and perhaps even being given an actual leadership role.  At work, promotions are fewer and farther between.

If you find yourself in a place in your career where you have not been engaged in anything but the job, you need to work quickly to plug in somewhere.  Perhaps you should spend some time reflecting on what you really care about and see if there are any opportunities to engage locally.   If you get stuck, you can always think back to things you did in college as a volunteer and see if you can reinvent or re-engage the same or similar activities now.  This has the added benefit of appearing more like a long-term commitment or passion than something you ran out and did for application purposes.

In the end, business schools want to be bringing in future business leaders of tomorrow—people who are passionate, engaging and care about their broader community.   Sometimes even postponing your application window is necessary to make sure you can do enough soul-searching to ensure you are the kind of person who will give back.  But it’s never too soon to start doing so.

Learn about top MBA programs by downloading our Essential Guides! Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or click here to take our Free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter.

Scott Bryant has over 25 years of professional post undergraduate experience in the entertainment industry as well as on Wall Street with Goldman Sachs. He served on the admissions committee at the Fuqua School of Business where he received his MBA and now works part time in retirement for a top tier business school. He has been consulting with Veritas Prep clients for the past six admissions seasons. See more of his articles here.
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School Profile: You Can Be the Next Wonder Woman at Barnard  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 09:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: School Profile: You Can Be the Next Wonder Woman at Barnard College
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Barnard College, a private women’s liberal arts college in New York City, is #51 among schools in the Veritas Prep Elite College Rankings and is one of the most selective women’s colleges in the United States. Founded in 1889, the four-acre urban campus is adjacent to Columbia University in New York City’s Manhattan neighborhood. Barnard has a complicated relationship with Columbia University, being both a wholly independent entity with its own governance, and also a college within Columbia. Barnard students graduate with Columbia University diplomas that are signed by the Presidents of both colleges.

The academics at Barnard College offer students a traditional liberal arts education, putting the emphasis on exploring the world from a wide variety of perspectives in a multitude of disciplines. The objective for a Barnard student is to develop her individual vision of how she can uniquely shape the world, and help her determine what her role could be within that vision. Barnard teaches their students how to think critically both inside and outside of the classroom in the sciences, humanities, social sciences, the arts, and world languages. This is an academic program for brave young women who constantly exchange ideas without being afraid to take risks both intellectually and creatively.

The most unique thing about academics at Barnard College is the “Nine Ways of Knowing”, which is the foundation of students’ success. With these unique requirements students get a deep understanding of world issues and the academic relationships necessary to solve them. Internships, research opportunities, and traveling abroad are just a few of the ways students can enhance their education. As an extension of Columbia University, students also get access to the University’s resources and social experiences, and Columbia students can enjoy Barnard resources.

Student life at Barnard College is unlike most; because it is an extension of Columbia University and students have access to both campuses. This dual access literally doubles the number of activities in all areas of student life; couple that with a New York City location, and you’ll find yourself always doing something. Every student at Barnard is part of the Student Government Association. There are multiple groups, clubs, associations, and resources offered on both campuses where students can participate in everything from the University radio station or magazine to joining a language club or theatre troupe.

Greek Life at Barnard would be non-existent if they did not have access to Columbia University, as sororities were banned at Barnard in 1913. Students can participate in Greek life at Columbia and join one of five sororities. Greek life is not that popular for students at either school, and many wouldn’t even know it existed if it wasn’t for Greek Week, where the various houses compete with each other on the Columbia campus. During Rush Week, fraternity pledges serenade the Barnard quad on one evening.

Barnard College is the only all-female school to play at the NCAA Division I level. Barnard student athletes are part of the Columbia-Barnard Athletic Association and play on Columbia University’s fifteen varsity women’s teams in the Ivy League Conference. Many students in online forums have a “We have sports here?” attitude toward varsity athletics, saying that it is difficult for college sports to compete with everything else there is to do in the Big Apple. Fair point. In fact, many of the teams have achieved only a modicum of success. Besides varsity sports, Barnard women can also compete on more than 30 popular club sports teams like sailing, hiking, and skiing. For those women who play for the love of the game over the love of competition, there are several intramural sports teams to join like dodge ball, floor hockey, or squash.

Barnard has a number of traditions including the ever popular Big Sub, where students help build and then eat a submarine sandwich which grows a foot each year and nearly spans the length of the campus. Orgo Night is another tradition Barnard students enjoy; the Columbia Marching Band plays in the Barnard Quad on the eve of the Organic Chemistry final. Midnight Breakfast, another hit with students, marks the beginning of every finals week when the college trustees, deans, and President serve food from theme-based menus to roughly 1000 students. Other traditions include Take Back the Night march, WBAR barbecue, Spirit Day, Night Carnival, Barnard Build-a-Bear, Bling Night, and more.

If you are looking for the intimate environment of a small, women’s liberal arts college in arguably the most happening city in the country, Barnard College is your place.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Should You Double Check Your Answer Choices on the GMAT? [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 16:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Should You Double Check Your Answer Choices on the GMAT?
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A common mantra heard when studying for the GMAT is that you have to be fast when answering questions. This is absolutely true, as the exam is testing not only your reasoning skills but also your time management skills. This does not, however, necessarily mean that you must solve every question quickly. Indeed, there may be times where you feel fairly confident in the answer choice you’ve selected, but you don’t feel 100% certain (maybe a strong 60%). In these situations, it’s perfectly acceptable to double check your answer manually.

Needless to say, having a sound understanding of the theory and logic of a question is ideal. Completely understanding the possibilities, rules and potential traps of a certain topic regularly leads you to select the correct answer choice. However, it is almost inevitable that a topic, notion or concept will come up that you don’t fully comprehend (or comprehend at all). In that case, it’s often best to try and determine a logical answer and double check it with some manual verification.

Obviously, if an answer asks you to sum all the integers from 1 to 150, you hopefully have a better strategy than simple brute force. Solving such a question without a calculator in less than 2 minutes is a fool’s errand. If you begin adding 1 to 2 to 3 to 4, you know you’re in trouble (unless you’re 5½ years old). Nonetheless, many questions can be solved via brute force within the given time constraints, if only with the help of a little bit of logic to narrow down the answer choices.

Let’s look at a Data Sufficiency problem that highlights these issues:

If P and Q represent the hundreds and tens digits, respectively, in the four-digit number x=8PQ2, is x divisible by 8?

(1) P = 4

(2) Q = 0

(A) Statement 1 alone is sufficient but statement 2 alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

(B) Statement 2 alone is sufficient but statement 1 alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

(C) Both statements 1 and 2 together are sufficient to answer the question but neither statement is sufficient alone.

(D) Each statement alone is sufficient to answer the question.

(E) Statements 1 and 2 are not sufficient to answer the question asked and additional data is needed to answer the statements.

This is a fairly straight forward divisibility question asking about whether a certain number is divisible by 8. However, there is one caveat: two of the digits can change. This question allows for different tens and hundreds digits, and this oscillation allows for no fewer than 100 distinct options to consider for divisibility. A brute force approach would take far too long, so we need to undertake a logical approach to a divisibility rule that is often overlooked because it is uncommon (as opposed to mythic rare).

To be divisible by 8, the rule you might know is that the last 3 digits must be divisible by 8. This essentially truncates anything bigger than the hundreds, and is due to the fact that 1,000 is divisible by 8, so any multiple of 1,000 can be ignored as it is necessarily also divisible by 8. Knowing this, we can ignore the “8” at the beginning of the number and concentrate on the 3-digit PQ2. Determining the divisibility of the last 3 digits isn’t too hard if those numbers are static. If they vary, though, the answer may be harder to pinpoint.

Let’s start with statement 1: P=4. If this is true, then we’ve turned the abstract question into the more straight forward determination of whether 4Q2 is divisible by 8, which really is just asking if {402, 412, 422, …, 492} are all divisible by 8. This is small enough that we can brute force it, especially if we recognize that 400 is divisible by 8 (the quotient would be exactly 50). 402 is then logically not divisible by 8, since it is only 2 away from a known multiple of 8. 412 is similarly not divisible by 8, and neither is 422. However, 432 is divisible by 8 (yielding a quotient of 54). This means that we have at least one value that is divisible by 8 (432) and at least one value that is not (402). Statement 1 will thus be insufficient.

Logically, this inconsistency should make sense. We are taking an even number and adding 10 to it. While 10 is not divisible by 8, multiples of 10 will be divisible by 8, and we’ll eventually cycle through a few numbers that are perfectly divisible by 8. Even if we can’t easily see this logic on test day, a strategic brute force will confirm these suspicions. There are only 10 numbers to check in the worst case, and we can stop whenever we can confidently say whether the statement is sufficient or not. This leaves only answer choices B, C and E possible.

Let us now look at statement 2: Q = 0. This ultimately means we must check the divisibility of P02, which is {102, 202, 302, …, 902}. This is not necessarily trivial, but if we check for 102, we know that 80 is divisible by 8, thus so is 88, 96 and 104. Since 102 falls in the gap between two multiples, it is not a multiple of 8. Next we can check 202, and if you recognize that 200 is a multiple of 8 (8×25), you’ll know fairly quickly that 202 is not a multiple. You can check the remaining eight choices quickly if you use your logic and start from numbers you know to be divisible by 8 (400, 600, 800). Even using this painstaking method, you can determine that all ten choices are not divisible by 8 within a minute. If none of the choices work, then we can confidently assert that this statement is sufficient to get a consistent answer of no on this question. Answer choice B is correct.

There are more logical tenets that help guide you on these types of questions, but they’re not necessarily well known. For example, any number that is divisible by 8 must also be divisible by 4, meaning that dividing by 4 can be used as an easy filter (like coloring inside the lines). Any number that ends in 02 will not be divisible by 4, no matter what the hundreds digit is. Therefore, this statement will always produce an answer of no. Even if you utilized this property and were leaning towards answer choice B, it doesn’t hurt to double check your answers manually. Often, double checking your answers can lead to double digit improvements on your GMAT score.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Ron Awad is a GMAT instructor for Veritas Prep based in Montreal, bringing you weekly advice for success on your exam.  After graduating from McGill and receiving his MBA from Concordia, Ron started teaching GMAT prep and his Veritas Prep students have given him rave reviews ever since.
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Your Simple Study Guide to the SAT [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2014, 10:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Your Simple Study Guide to the SAT
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There are only three more SAT test dates remaining for 2014! Be sure to visit www.collegeboard.org to register and review your resources in your student account. The upcoming dates are as follows:

  • Saturday, October 11
  • Saturday, November 8
  • Saturday, December 6
With only a few months to prepare, you will want to follow some general guidelines before you take test. Here are some basics to consider as you prepare for the SAT.

BASELINE SCORE. Within your College Board student account, take an official SAT practice test to get your baseline score. You will want to see where you need to focus and once you know your strengths and challenges, purchase the SAT 2400 book and start reviewing test taking strategies.

CONSISTENT SCHEDULE. Plan to study a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 4 days per week. Begin with your weakest subject and carve out a specific time daily to devote to your studies. Memorize two vocabulary words per day (minimum) and do the College Board’s SAT Question of the Day. Set up reasonable goals so that you can chip away at your weaknesses. Gauge yourself by doing practice problems to monitor your improvement. Frequently reviewing in small doses will maximize your memorization and help you to progress quickly.

PREP LOCATION. It is critical that you can concentrate so you don’t passively learn test taking strategies. Study in a quiet location with plenty of workspace – coffee shop, library, or school. It is beneficial to be away from home so you don’t get distracted. This includes the virtual world as well – set aside your iPhone so that Facebook, Twitter, and texting don’t pull you away from precious study time.

MOVE, STUDY, SLEEP. Your mind needs clarity and physical activity to function at peak performance. Embrace a healthy lifestyle; go outside and get moving. Opt for the salad instead of the steak. If you’ve been studying at the same table at Starbucks, stand up and walk around. Movement and short breaks will help you study more efficiently. Don’t fall for “cramming” by drinking four cups of coffee the night before the test. Get a full 8 hours of sleep before taking the SAT; this will improve your well being and make you more effective on the test.

PRACTICE POSITIVITY. Set aside time to prepare yourself psychologically for the SAT. The power of positive thinking has been proven over and over again to work wonders when it comes to stress and test anxiety. Through optimistic self-talk, you can overcome the challenge of the exam and look at the situation as an opportunity. Take on the SAT with a positive mentality and you will handle the reading, writing, and math sections calmly and coherently.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

By Shay Davis
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GMAT Tip of the Week: Come On,Commas! 3 Reasons You Should L [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2014, 16:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: Come On,Commas! 3 Reasons You Should Look Forward To Commas On Sentence Correction
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Admit it – perhaps your favorite thing about the social media revolution is that you’re (or is it “your”?) almost done having to think about punctuation ever again. Hashtags don’t allow for punctuation, and with only 140 characters to express your point of view or challenge three friends to dump water on their heads, who can afford to waste a character on a comma or semicolon?

But regardless of how you feel about punctuation in your own writing, you should look forward to seeing a certain type of punctuation on GMAT Sentence Correction questions. Why?

Commas are clues.

While you’re doing Sentence Correction problems, commas can alert you to three very important Decision Points or strategic uses:

1) Commas help you identify Modifier errors.

Consider this sentence, which comes straight from the Official Guide for GMAT Review:

Architects and stonemasons, huge palace and temple clusters were built by the Maya without the benefit of the wheel or animal transport.

That comma should jump off the screen at you – when a comma appears in the first 10 words of a sentence and is underlined or touches the underlined portion, there’s an incredibly high likelihood that you’re dealing with a Modifier error in at least a couple answer choices. Even more so, if the comma is at the beginning or end of the underline, that probability creeps up to almost 100% – most modifiers are set off by commas, and the most hard-and-fast rules for modifiers apply toward the beginnings of sentences (participial and appositive modifiers get to take some liberties toward the ends of sentences), so in a case like this you should be salivating when you see that comma after the third word and touching the underline. Since “Architects and stonemasons” is a modifier here, it has to logically be able to describe the next noun, and here it cannot (palaces and temple clusters can never be architects), so you have not only eliminated A but also identified the “game” in the sentence – now you have to go find a proper modifier or continue to eliminate flawed ones.

2) Commas signal nonessential modifiers, helping you lighten your load.

What if the sentence above were changed to:

Architects and stonemasons, the most respected of early Mayan craftsmen, were built without the benefit of the wheel or animal transport.

That comma in the same place still alerts you to a modifier, but in this case “the most respected of early Mayan craftsmen” can logically modify “Architects and stonemasons.” So you can’t eliminate this sentence. But since you have identified a *valid* modifier, you have another tool at your disposal – you can ignore it! We call this the “Use It or Lose It” modifier strategy. When you see a modifier, if you don’t “Use It” to eliminate the answer choice (because the modifier is flawed) then “Lose It” – that modifier just adds extra description that isn’t totally necessary to the meaning of the sentence, so you can stop reading at the first comma and start reading again at the second, making the sentence:

Architects and stonemasons were built without the benefit…

And there you should see the mistake – logically that doesn’t work, since architects aren’t “built.” The modifier in this iteration of the sentence is there to distract you from the subject of the sentence, but by identifying commas that set apart a valid modifier, you can lift out that part of the sentence and more quickly cut to the chase.

3) Commas signify lists (which in turn need to be parallel).

Consider another sentence from the GMAT Prep Question Pack:

Displays of the aurora borealis, or “northern lights,” can heat the atmosphere over the arctic enough to affect the trajectories of ballistic missiles, induce electric currents that can cause blackouts in some areas and corrosion in north-south pipelines.

In this sentence, look at that underlined comma next to “induce.” “Induce” is a verb and is not used here as a description, so that comma-verb combination should jump out at you as a clue. This may well be setting up a list of verbs that all stem from one subject or action, like “the race requires competitors to swim in frigid waters, bike across rugged terrain, and run along challenging trails” in which the list of verbs “swim, bike, and run” all must be parallel.

Here, notice that the verb prior to “induce” is “to affect” – this should show you that the displays of the northern lights heats the atmosphere enough to do at least two things:

*affect (the trajectories)

*induce (electric currents)

*and…anything else?

That comma before “induce” should have you on a hunt for that third item in the list, preceded by the word “and” – if you can’t find it, the sentence is wrong. You can’t say “Tonight I plan to exercise, eat dinner.” It has to be “…exercise, eat dinner, and (third verb)” or “…exercise and eat dinner.” So when you see that comma before the verb, you should check to see if you’re dealing with a list, and then make sure that the list is complete (with a connector like “and” or “or” before the last item) and parallel.

Commas may be going the way of bookstores and newspapers, a bit outdated for the social media generation, but at least on GMAT Sentence Correction they’re still important. So in your question for a GMAT score that’s well above “comma” it will pay to look for the comma.

Are you studying for the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

By Brian Galvin
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2 Simple GMAT Quant Questions That Will Help You Score Highe [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2014, 10:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: 2 Simple GMAT Quant Questions That Will Help You Score Higher
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Let’s discuss races today. It is a very simple concept but questions on it tend to be tricky. But if you understand how to handle them, most questions can be done easily.

A few points to remember in races:

1. Make a diagram. Draw a straight line to show the track and assume all racers are at start at 12:00. Then according to headstart, place the participants.

2. There are two types of head starts: Time and distance

Say there is a 1000 feet race between A and B which starts at 12:00.

Time – A gives B a headstart of 1 min means B starts running at 12:00 and A waits at the start point. Then A starts running from the start point at 12:01.

Distance – A gives B a headstart of 10 feet means A starts from the start point but B starts from the point 10 feet ahead (and hence runs only 990 feet to complete the race)

3. A dead heat is a race in which both the participants finish exactly at the same time. Most races in race questions end in a dead heat!

4. There are two ways in which a participant can beat another: Time and distance

Say A beats B in the 1000 feet race in which both start from the start point at 12:00.

Distance – If A beats B by 20 feet,  it means A finishes the race (full 1000 feet) and at that time, B is 20 feet away from the finish line.

Time – If A beats B by 2 mins, it means that if A finished at 12:10, B is still 2 mins away from the finish line i.e. at his/her speed, B takes 2 mins to reach the finish line.

That is all! Now let’s look at some questions:

Question 1: A’s speed is 20/17 times that of B. If A and B run a race, what part of the length of the race should A give B as a head start, so that the race ends in a dead heat?

(A)   1/17

(B)   3/17

(C)   1/10

(D)   3/20

(E)    3/10

Solution: We have the ratio of A’s speed and B’s speed. This means, we know how much distance A covers compared with B in the same time.

This is what the beginning of the race will look like:

(Start) A_________B______________________________

If A covers 20 meters, B covers 17 meters in that time. So if the race is 20 meters long, when A reaches the finish line, B would be 3 meters behind him. If we want the race to end in a dead heat, we want B to be at the finish line too at the same time. This means B should get a head start of 3 meters so that he doesn’t need to cover that. In that case, the time required by A (to cover 20 meters) would be the same as the time required by B (to cover 17 meters) to reach the finish line.

So B should get a head start of 3/20th of the race.

Answer (D)

This question was relatively very straight forward and we gave it only to help you apply the concepts discussed above. Let’s make it slightly tricky now.

Question 2: A’s speed is 20/17 times that of B. If A and B run a race, what part of the length of the race should A give B as a head start, so that B beats A by 20% of the length of the race?

(A)   15%

(B)   20%

(C)   28%

(D)   32%

(E)    35%

Solution: Again, we have ratio of A’s speed and B’s speed given as 20:17. If A covers 20 meters, B covers 17 meters in that time. This time, let’s assume that the length of the race is 25 meters.

At the beginning, this is what the 25 meter track will look like with a head start to B:

(Start ) A_________B_______________________________

Since A will give B a head start so A must start from the start line while B will start from ahead.

Since A should cover only 80% of the length of the race, when B reaches the finish line, A should still have 20% of the track leftover.

20% of the track will be (20/100)*25 = 5 meters. So A should be at 20 meters when B is at the finish line.

So this is what the finish of the race will look like:

____________20_________________A____5_____B (Finish)

A will cover a total of 20 meters when B should be at the finish line. In this time, B will cover only 17 meters. But the total track is of 25 meters. So the rest of the 25-17 = 8 meters, B should get as a head start.

Head start will be 8/25 *100 = 32% of the race.

Answer (D)

If you found it tricky, we would suggest you to practice some more races questions. It is usually easy to “figure out” the answer logically and the calculations required are minimum.

Now try this official question. We will solve it for you next week.

Question 3: A and B run a race of 2000 m. First, A gives B a start of 200m and beats him by 30 seconds. Next, A gives B a start of 3mins and is beaten by 1000m. Find the time in minutes in which A and B can run the race separately.

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!
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How to Understand Your GMAT Practice Test Results and Score  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2014, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Understand Your GMAT Practice Test Results and Score Higher Next Time
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Panic starts to creep in.

“How could this have happened? I was doing so well!”, you think. “What do I do now?”

A bad practice test can happen to anyone. In isolation, it’s certainly not the end of the world, but you should use the result to diagnose what went wrong and how to fix it moving forward. There are several potential causes worth considering. Let’s look at a few:

1. Mental/Physical

In many respects, the GMAT is as much a psychological exam as a content exam. Your mental state going into the test can set you up for success or failure.

Were you fatigued or stressed before the exam started? If so, your ability to pick up on subtle clues and notice testmaker tricks and traps was likely not at its usual level. Even if you felt fine to start the test, you may have “hit the wall” midway through the test. Many students have performed normally through the first part of the test, only to run out of gas towards the end of the quant section or in the verbal section.

If this is you, consider how you can improve your pre-test condition. Are you sleeping and eating well?  Are work and other responsibilities taking a toll? Obviously, quitting your job to study for the GMAT is not a winning proposition, but recognize that there may be situations in which taking a practice test is counterproductive. If you don’t feel great when you’re about to start the test, push it back by a day or two.

2. Technical

GMAT writers are masterful at asking the same question in multiple ways. You may know how to handle a question when asked one way, but when the test asks you to solve in a different way, you’re not as comfortable.

Thanks to the adaptive nature of the exam, you can see a practice test where specific question types (such as exponents or weighted average) are asked in a way that fits what you’re good at, and you do well on them. Conversely, you may see the same concepts asked in a way that exploits your conceptual weaknesses, and you struggle more than expected.

If this is you, consider what gave you trouble. If you notice that your understanding of triangles or ratios isn’t as thorough as you thought, you now know what to address to improve going forward.  Having a strong grasp of multiple approaches will make you more prepared to handle a question type, regardless of how it is set up.

3. Tactical

Even if your conceptual knowledge is strong, it’s still possible to run into issues with test strategy. Allow stubbornness to creep in on a few early questions, and your pacing may be off for the rest of the section. If you get away from your standard approach for a specific question type (such as Data Sufficiency or Sentence Correction), you may open yourself up to errors you wouldn’t make on homework questions.

If this is you, review your overall approach to the exam. How are you keeping track of pacing? If this is a consistent struggle, find a way to make sure you stay on track. Can you get better at letting go of questions that got away from you? Work on recognizing when to make a guess and move on to save time for questions you can get right. Are you finding ways to answer questions more easily or quickly?  When you review practice problems, look for clues in the question and answers that could’ve led to a more efficient solution.

A bad result is a perfect opportunity for self reflection. You have time to come up with a plan of attack, and with this new information you can tailor your approach to the areas that need improvement. After all, it’s much better to have your weaknesses exposed by a practice test than the real thing!

Are you studying for the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

By Bill Robinson
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School Profile: Give Back and Become a Global Citizen at Mac [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2014, 11:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: School Profile: Give Back and Become a Global Citizen at Macalester College
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Macalester College, a small private liberal arts college in the Midwest, is ranked #54 among the Veritas Prep College Rankings. Located in an elegant old residential neighborhood, it is just minutes from the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. The Twin Cities is a lively metropolitan area that boasts museums, eclectic restaurants, Fortune 500 hundred companies, a variety of shows, and much more.

This is the perfect place for students to get top-of-the-line internships, delve into cultural experiences, immerse themselves in the arts, and find meaningful ways to give back and create positive change. Macalester provides its students with excellent academic programs, athletic opportunities, and cultural diversity.

Macalester is a small liberal arts college that was founded in 1874; its continued devotion to improving academics programs, hiring exceptional faculty, and providing top notch resources and opportunities is what allows Macalester students to thrive. The success of the students who attend Macalester starts with the faculty, where more than ninety percent hold the highest degrees in their field, or have doctorates. The school combines an elite faculty with small class sizes that provide students an exceptional, personalized academic experience. Students can choose from over 35 majors and 63 areas of study, with more than 800 courses in over 30 departments.

One of the most notable aspects of Macalester is their dedication to Global Citizenship. They have one of the highest percentages of international students in the nation. Students are encouraged to partake in internships and service learning opportunities both nationally and internationally, tackling some of the world’s most complex issues in their prospective professions. Macalester puts an emphasis on multiculturalism, service to society, and internationalism within their academic programs, creating global citizens in their desired fields.

Macalester College, an NCAA Division III college, competes in the MIAC where both men and women compete in roughly ten different sports. For those who do not wish compete on varsity teams, there are club and intramural sports for the entire student body. These teams develop leadership skills and confidence in a healthy and fun environment. Fitness is important at Macalester; staff in the campus fitness center create strength training and conditioning programs for individuals based on scientific training methods and principles. Whether you want the thrill of competition or to maintain a healthy lifestyle, Macalester has the tools and resources to assist you.

Like many colleges Macalester requires students to live on campus for the first two years. This requirement is the perfect way for students to grow socially and be surrounded by like-minded people. While there is no Greek life at Macalester, there are language houses as well as hobby and lifestyle houses that allow students with similar interests to connect. There are a wide variety of clubs offered at Macalester from Bio Club to Climbing Club and everything in between. Civic engagement opportunities are abundant locally, nationally, and internationally allowing students to find projects they are passionate about and give back to a multitude of communities. Student publications and the arts also play an important role on campus.

One of the biggest traditions at Macalester is a game of pushball usually done in March where students separate by class and compete against each other. Pushball is simply trying to push a giant ball across a goal. The winning team will usually take on the staff and faculty team; while not every student participates, many come out to cheer on their respective classes. Other favorite traditions at Macalester include Fall Harvest Fest and Spring Fest. Harvest Fest is celebrated in November where students eat delicious potluck food, listen to old timey folk music, and contra dance. Spring Fest is all about music; students enjoy talented local musicians and even the school band.

Macalester could be a great choice for you if you embrace Midwest values, love a good garage band, and feel comfortably confident in the rec room or the board room.

Do you need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
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Laughter is the Best Medicine When You're Agonizing Over the GMAT [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2014, 10:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Laughter is the Best Medicine When You're Agonizing Over the GMAT
Steven Wright is a comedian known for his deadpan delivery, and, it turns out, has a lot to say – in his dry, paraprosdokian way – about the logic of the GMAT.  Never ones to let insight go to waste, we can (somewhat, perhaps) better understand the GMAT with his Wit and Wisdom:

Suddenly the chances of scoring in a top percentile don’t seem so bad.

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If it comes to this … at least we won’t panic.

Image

I knew 10 easy questions in a row seemed too good to be true…

Image

So that’s where they’re hiding it.

Image

What can we infer here?  Not all, but at least Some.

Image

And, the GMAT is a better choice than the LSAT, perhaps. Better take plenty of practice tests.

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And, thanks to GMAC’s new score-cancellation policy…. You mean I can now cancel my score after seeing it?

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Those who struggle with the GMAT often fall into two camps – those who take it too seriously and those who don’t take it seriously enough – each a kind of evil.  If this sounds like you, take another tip from Mr. Wright: “if you must choose between two evils, pick the one you’ve never tried before.”

So remember these bits of wit, as unconventional as they seem, when studying for your GMAT.  Though they sound like cynical one-liners and wry observations, ironically they speak to a set of truths.  Truths that can work in your favor come game day.  Not that you should take them too seriously.

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Joseph Dise has been teaching GMAT preparation for Veritas Prep for the last 6 years in Paris, New Brunswick, and New York City.
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How to Use Your Calculator to Boost Your SAT Score [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2014, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: How to Use Your Calculator to Boost Your SAT Score
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A calculator is one of the most underutilized tools on the SAT. It’s the one device that the College Board permits, which actually makes problems easier. Yet, I see students consistently fail to take advantage of the technological marvel that is the calculator. It’s true that you can solve every problem without a calculator. However, it becomes more difficult and more time consuming – two things we try to mitigate on the SAT.

Whether it is a TI 84 or a TI 89, mastering your calculator can have incredible effects for your performance on the SAT. Shaving off time is one of the best ways to rock the math section. If you are able to work with large and difficult numbers, you will have a greater chance of solving these problems using your calculator. With that in mind, here are three different ways to best use your calculator in the test.

Plug in numbers for variables:

Math problems are tedious and take precious time as the clock ticks on. A remedy for this is to immediately plug the equations into your calculator and solve variables (letters: x, y, z) by using real values. Be sure to avoid zero and one. Imagine how much easier it is when you are confronted with three digit constants to accompany your variables. Remember, don’t just plug in with variables. Plug in and go straight to the calculator.

Anything with Pi:

Pi messes with our minds and leads to easy mistakes when done by hand. The beauty of the calculator is that it has a Pi button built in. This allows you to avoid simple mistakes made when working with problems related to circles. Pi will generally be relevant for any problem associated with circles; often the problem will ask you solve for the diameter, radius, segments, or arcs. Generally the answer choices will include Pi in them (for example A. 10(Pi) B. 15(Pi) C. 20(Pi) and so on). A key here is to simply divide by Pi at the end of your work on the calculator. If the work is correct, the number will correspond with the correct answer. Remember that it will have a Pi accompanying it, and you will be good to go!

Proportions and Ratios:

Proportions and ratios on the SAT are usually quite easy to work with. Once you set them up, you can isolate for the missing variable and solve. This is all done by hand. Since this is set up on the paper, we are lulled into a false sense of confidence about quickly calculating the variables’ value. Anytime this is done mentally or by multiplying on paper, it wastes unnecessary time. Getting in the habit of immediately plugging in to solve for proportions on the calculator can save you a minute or even two. While this may not seem like a lot, it translates to anywhere from four to ten percent extra time for your to work on other problems.

Remember, you don’t get extra points for solving in your head. The calculator is powerful tool you can use to attack the math section. Whenever you can, find shortcuts to success on the SAT. These strategies could be what separates a good score from a great score.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Jake Davidson is a Mork Family Scholar at USC and enjoys writing for the school paper as well as participating in various clubs. He has been tutoring privately since the age of 15 and is incredibly excited to help students succeed on the SAT.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Marisa

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Veritas Prep Reviews

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