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All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the

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All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Oct 2017, 23:14
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A
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E

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All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the same six colors – black, white, red, green, blue and yellow – corresponding to the primary neural responses revealed in studies of human color perception. In addition, all languages known to have only three basic color terms distinguish among “black,” “white,” and “red.” This evidence shows that the way in which the mind recognizes differences among colored objects is not influenced by culture.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

(A) While languages differ in their number of basic color terms, no language has been conclusively determined to have more than eleven such terms.

(B) Every language contains mechanisms by which speakers who perceive subtle differences in hue can describe those differences.

(C) Among cultures employing only three color terms, the word “red” typically encompasses not only objects that would be called red in English but also those that would be called yellow.

(D) Several languages, such as Vietnamese and Pashto, use a single term to mean both blue and green, but speakers of such languages commonly refer to tree leaves or the sky to resolve ambiguous utterances.

(E) In a study of native speakers of Tarahumara, a language that does not distinguish between blue and green, respondents were less able to identify distinctions among blue and green chips than native speakers of Spanish, which does distinguish between blue and green.

Originally posted by DeeptiM on 07 Oct 2011, 10:47.
Last edited by hazelnut on 06 Oct 2017, 23:14, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2016, 01:07
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A very good question
THE ANSWER IS E

Lets deconstruct the argument
Premise 1) All languages that have only six colours, only recognise Black,White,Red,Green Blue, and Yellow.
Premise 2) All languages that have only three colours recognises, Black , white and red.
Conclusion :- Brains ability to recognise colour is not influenced by culture. Meaning that people of one culture should identify the color as easily as the people of other culture

AIM IS TO WEAKEN THE CONCLUSION- to show that people from different culture have different response towards colours when they are asked to recognise or identify those colours.

A. While languages differ in their number of basic color terms, no language has been conclusively determined to have more than eleven such terms.
WRONG:- Talks about number of colours in a culture/language. we already know languages have different number of colours , some 6 some 3 some 11. Does not address the issue.

B. Every language contains mechanisms by which speakers who perceive subtle differences in hue can describe those differences.
WRONG:- Mildly strengthening . Tells us that people can identify even subtle difference in colour. we have to show people can't identify.

C. Among cultures employing only three color terms, the word “red” typically encompasses not only objects that would be called red in English but also those that would be called yellow.
HOLD IT :- Ok may be this is a good answer. If people point to yellow sunflower and say its red sunflower than it weakens, so hold this option.
]
D. Several languages, such as Vietnamese and Pashto, use a single term to mean both blue and green, but speakers of such languages commonly refer to tree leaves or the sky to resolve ambiguous utterances.
WRONG;- strengthen the argument. Despite a single term for two colours , they know that leaves and sky are different coloured objects.

E. In a study of native speakers of Tarahumara, a language that does not distinguish between blue and green, respondents were less able to identify distinctions among blue and green chips than native speakers of Spanish, which does distinguish between blue and green.
CORRECT; BETTER THAN OPTION C. First it talks about two cultures that have different terms for different colours. (spanish and tarahumara). Secondly it tells that Tarahumara people cannot distinguish blue and green. It makes our argument weak. We can conclusively show that cultures/Language with less terms for colours get easily confused than cultures with more terms with colours. Thus telling us culture do play a important part in recognising colours.

DeeptiM wrote:
All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the same six colors –
black, white, red, green, blue and yellow – corresponding to the primary neural responses
revealed in studies of human color perception. In addition, all languages known to have
only three basic color terms distinguish among “black,” “white,” and “red.” This evidence
shows that the way in which the mind recognizes differences among colored objects is not
influenced by culture.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

A. While languages differ in their number of basic color terms, no language has been
conclusively determined to have more than eleven such terms.

B. Every language contains mechanisms by which speakers who perceive subtle differences in
hue can describe those differences.

C. Among cultures employing only three color terms, the word “red” typically encompasses
not only objects that would be called red in English but also those that would be called
yellow.

D. Several languages, such as Vietnamese and Pashto, use a single term to mean both blue
and green, but speakers of such languages commonly refer to tree leaves or the sky to
resolve ambiguous utterances.

E. In a study of native speakers of Tarahumara, a language that does not distinguish between
blue and green, respondents were less able to identify distinctions among blue and green
chips than native speakers of Spanish, which does distinguish between blue and green.

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Re: All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2011, 19:31
I pick E.

E compares native speakers of Tarahumara to the Spanish; a culture that does not distinguish colors red/blue with a culture that does. If culture ( and by extension, its linguistic limitation) is not to have a bearing on color perception, then the people of Tarahumara should be able to distinguish the difference between blue and green. This is not the case. Further, this impairment does not affect the Spanish, whose language does differentiate between the two colors.

My initial pick was C. But "object that would be called yellow" left me with a little skepticism. Are things that are called 'yellow' necessarily yellow? Like 'yellow' fever for example? Since C talks of a cultures that only employ 3 color groups, we have no idea how they will perceive yellow. More reason to doubt C.

E sounds better.

I took 147 seconds on this. So I loose anyway :(
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Re: All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2011, 20:06
I pick D.

D talks about how speakers of different languages differentiate between colored objects, and they all share the same thoughts for green and blue..
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Re: All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2011, 17:05
DexDee wrote:
I pick E.

E compares native speakers of Tarahumara to the Spanish; a culture that does not distinguish colors red/blue with a culture that does. If culture ( and by extension, its linguistic limitation) is not to have a bearing on color perception, then the people of Tarahumara should be able to distinguish the difference between blue and green. This is not the case. Further, this impairment does not affect the Spanish, whose language does differentiate between the two colors.

My initial pick was C. But "object that would be called yellow" left me with a little skepticism. Are things that are called 'yellow' necessarily yellow? Like 'yellow' fever for example? Since C talks of a cultures that only employ 3 color groups, we have no idea how they will perceive yellow. More reason to doubt C.

E sounds better.

I took 147 seconds on this. So I loose anyway :(


Same reasoning for E, though i didn't pay much attention to C because its the only tempting answer choice with " word Culture " ... D i ruled out easily because " Pashto " is my lingo... :wink: ...
2mints: 25 seconds to answer, cuz i read the argument 3 times :roll:
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Re: All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2011, 02:17
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Conclusion: the way in which the mind recognizes differences among colored objects is not influenced by culture.

Quote:
D. Several languages, such as Vietnamese and Pashto, use a single term to mean both blue and green, but speakers of such languages commonly refer to tree leaves or the sky to resolve ambiguous utterances.


The single terms of both colors blue and green are recognized by the thought referring those colors to certain object. Not talk about anything culture have effects on ability to recognize.

Quote:
E. In a study of native speakers of Tarahumara, a language that does not distinguish between blue and green, respondents were less able to identify distinctions among blue and green chips than native speakers of Spanish, which does distinguish between blue and green.


Language of Tarahumara does not distinguish btw blue and green => cannot recognize the different color
Spanish distinguishes btw blue and green => can recognize the different color

Languages (can be consider culture) have influences on the ability of mind to recognize color

Hope that help.
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Re: All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the  [#permalink]

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Re: All languages known to have exactly six basic color terms describe the &nbs [#permalink] 16 Sep 2018, 05:04
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